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    • Madison, James

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Will you be so good as to read the inclosed Letter from Dr. Belknap and tell me, from your Recollection of what passed in Congress in 1779 1780 & 1781, whether there is any Colour for the Imputation cast on our Country by Dr Kippis. I cannot say as Dr Belknap has been informed that Dr Kippis is my Correspondent. I never wrote a Letter to him or received a Letter from him that I recollect.—I...
Will you be so good as to read the inclosed Letter from Dr Belknap and tell me, from your Recollection of what passed in Congress in 1779. 1780 & 1781, whether there is any Colour for the Imputation cast on our Country by Dr Kippis. I cannot say as Dr Belknap has been informed that Dr Kippis is my Correspondent. I never wrote a Letter to him or received a Letter from him that I recollect. I...
Colo. Heth has at length brought the Money, and taken up your dr[a]ft for £100. which enables me to transmit your Bond, and the Auditor’s receipt. It will ever give me satisfaction to serve you, being with very great esteem & regard, Dear Sir Your obedt Servt Know all men by these presents that I, James Madison Junior of the County of Orange in Virginia, am held and firmly bound to his...
I did myself the pleasure to write you and enclosed the £100. Bond cancelled—with the Auditor’s Receipt in full discharge thereof. I hope the letter arrived safe. It will give us all here very great satisfaction to hear you are perfectly recovered. I am Dear Sir With very great esteem & regard Your obedt Servt The enclosed failed to reach Mr. Page before he left home; will you do me the favor...
It is with the greatest reluctance at any time that I can prevail on myself to solicit an appointment, or should I do it at present but at the particular desire of several of my friends in this country. I have therefore taken the liberty provided you think me qualifyed to use your interest in having me appointed to settle the Accounts of the United States with this State as I have observed...
I Read over with attention, your Speeches in Support of your Resolutions, & those of sundries against them, amongst the Chief’s reasons alledged, for their voting against them, the Strongest, & most unanswerable were— Mr. Smith of (S C) says they would affect materially those States, where manufactures had not made any great progress, & who had the more Bulky Articles of Exportations, that our...
It may be matter of surprize to you to receive a letter from a person whose name you, probably, may never have heard. I have been gratified by reading the printed debates in Congress on the important subject of the treaty-power . I have been particularly pleased with the political principles which, on various occasions, appear uniformly to have influenced your conduct. In the late debates in...
5 January 1796. JM has sold to Theodorus Bailey and John B. Van Wyck his land known as lot number two of the Sedachqueda Patent in the Mohawk Valley of New York, amounting to approximately nine hundred acres, at $5.83⅓ per acre, for a total of $5,250. Bailey and Van Wyck have paid JM $4,000 and have given him a note for $1,250 payable on or before 1 Jan. 1797. The parties agree to have the...
We the Under Signd. Citizens of the Town Of portland And falmouth in the Destrict Of Main, have Severely Sufferd by british piracy, which has Causd Us After Two years waiting with the Greatest patiance To forward On A Memoriel To Congress And in Order To Conciliate All parties Concernd it was Addrest To the Speaker of the house. Our Good Opinion of your publick Spirit Disintredness Integrety...
The Secretary of the Treasury has wrote the Officers of this Port, for the exact Sum, each Officer has received, up to the first of January. I hope the Secretary is of Opinion that our Fees are too small and that he will lay a Statement thereof before Congress, for Their Consideration. I have estimated on a frugal Plan the Sum I must expend for the Support of my Family, and find it will...
I had a long while impatiently waited to see the Secretary of the Treasurys report on the mode of compensation to the Officers of Revenue. Since that report was made, I cannot see by the debates, that the Honble. Congress, have acted on it. To speak of myself, my fees as Surveyor last year did not exceed £300—out of that sum, I have to pay for House rent & Clerks hire, £175. From last December...
Through some of my friends in Congress, I hope application is made for a further allowance in fees to the surveyor at Entry of Vessells under One Hundred Tons burthen, and for an allowance in fees from the Coasting Vessells. Vizt. Vessells from a Forreign Ports with Dutiable Goods All under 70 Tons, Two Dollars All above 70 Tons, Three Dollars From 60 to 100 Tons are generally the Sized...
I wrote you, as I said I would, by Mr. Adam Douglass one of our Merchants, but, to my great Mortification, he did not deliver the letter, & brought it back to me. I waited on Doctor Baldwin with the money you left in my hands as a compensation for his Professional Services. The Doctor said it was perfectly satisfactory, & that he had made no charge against you upon his books. I am now to thank...
Abstract. 20 December 1792, Philadelphia. A list of proposed alterations to the 1790 federal patent law, followed by “observations tending to demonstrate the Necessity and equity of the proposed amendments.” Includes remarks on how James Rumsey’s discoveries in working with steam power have been denied legal protection. “Since it is not the wish of any good Citizen, ’tis presumed the...
The American Masters of vessels now Forcibly detained here being occasionally Assembled for the purpose of mutual communications and comparison of Sentiments on their present Distressed situation. A Gazette from the United States was Introduced which contained the Resolutions by you proposed to the house of Representatives Jany 3d last, which were read with universal applause, and as the least...
Before I left New York, I had an Opportunity of explaining to Mr. Page the nature of the Circumstances, which obliged me to decline an Acceptance of the office, with which I was lately honored by the President and Senate. It is, therefore, unnecessary to trouble You, with a recapitulation of my inducements to that act of self-denial; having requested Mr. Page to communicate them to You. I...
I have taken the Liberty of requesting the favour of you to transact an affair of the greatest consequence to my poor Brother George’s Estate, his Acct with united States as an Officer of the 3d Regiment of Light Dragoon, is yet unsettled, a Statement of which by Capt: Barret one of his officers and also his Deposition respecting the Accts: are in Mr. Pearce’s office, or with the Commissioners...
I wrote you on this day week from New York, stating the causes which had induced a postponement of the settlement with Mr: Dohrman, until I could hear from you on the subject. I returned from New York on Friday evening and have been very unwell ever since, with the fever & Ague, occasioned by a cold caught in travelling, and I drop you this line merely to request as speedy an Answer to my...
I was detained by bad weather & other causes, so that I did not reach this until friday evening. The next day I saw Mr: Dorhman, who promises fairly, altho’ at the same time he talks of the scarcity of Money, his distresses &c. I expect to see him again to day, and you may be assured nothing in my power shall be omitted to obtain of him a full and satisfactory settlement. I have not seen...
I received your favor of the 1st: instant, covering one for Colo. M. which I shall forward to morrow; the mystery of his recall is not developed here, and can only be resolved into the personal hatred of Hamilton to Mr: M: and Mr: J:—and the intrigue of enlisting the interest of the Pinckney family, in the appointment of a president; and you may be assured that neither Hamilton or Jay, wish...
Your favor of the 3d: instant, and a preceeding one of 25th: Septr. came duly to hand. I should have written yo. immediately on my return from N. York, had not several circumstances occurred to prevent it, particularly the delay of a Meeting which was had last evening between Melancton Smith, on the part of the republican interest of NY. (specially deputed) and the principal movers of the same...
A few days ago a barrel of hams arrived to your address, which I immediately took into possession and had them opened—there were twelve apparently sound hams, which I have had hung up to dry & smoke. If it is agreeable to you, as I think it doubtful that they would keep ’till the winter, I will take them for my familys use and pay you the price of them, when we meet again, or in any other way...
I drop a line to inform you, that I returned to this place with all my family, on Saturday last, and that there is now as perfect safety from contagion of any kind as was ever known here; there is not known a single case of the yellow fever in the City or its suburbs; the Citizens have returned almost universally, the public Offices are all opened, as well as all the public & private...
A severe indisposition, the consequence of a violent cold which I caught on my return from Carlisle, has prevented an earlier acknowledgment of your favor of the 12th: ultimo. Its effects, however, are now subsiding, and I hope soon to be perfectly restored. I have not been able to discover any material change in the situation of the Virga. accounts, the Commissioner pursues his former course,...
Since I wrote you last, a considerable change has taken place in the state of our foreign & domestic intelligence. Advices from France as late as the 14th: July, exhibit a crisis in the internal affairs of that Country, which ’ere this must be determined and would probably decide the issue of the revolution; the Marquis Fayette appeared at the bar of the National Assembly & denounced the...
I have written you twice by post, once from New York and once since my return, but being without any acknowledgment of their receipt, am fearful of some miscarriage or failure thro’ the post Office. I stated to you very fully the reasons that delayed the settlement with Mr: Dohrman, and shall now repeat them; By the Mortgage to you of Novemr: 1788, the debt is specified and acknowledged to be...
I have purposely delayed answering your favor of the 10th: Ulto. until now, because of some political events here of a nature the most extraordinary, and in which you, as well as others, stand particularly involved and named; they stand connected with the causes of Mr: Randolphs resignation, and will be fully explained to you by Mr: Nicholas. To that Gentleman I must also refer you for all...
I took the liberty by favor of Mr: Jefferson, to forward to you sundry papers, which I thought would be useful for your information respecting the progress of the Virginia accounts; and it has been my constant purpose, hitherto, to follow them by a communication of such other circumstances on the subject as I might be able to collect, but, until yesterday, I have not been successful in...
Letter not found. 27 April 1795, New York. Mentioned in Beckley to JM, 4 May 1795 . Explains reasons why a settlement of Arnold Henry Dohrman’s debt to Philip Mazzei has been postponed. Needs to hear from JM.
Substance of a Conversation held by Js. Madison Jr with Col: Beckwith, at the desire of Mr. Jefferson— Last evening offered the first opportunity of breaking to Col B—— the subject for which he has been thought a proper channel to the Governour of Canada. It was explicitly made known to him, that besides its being generally understood that the N. W. Indians were supplied with the means of war...