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    • Randolph, Edmund
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    • Madison, James

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While I acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 10th. instant, I must assign as my apology for forgetting to answer the legal question, that a variety of family sickness has taken away a cool attention to business. The deed, to which the inclosed memorandum relates was executed in France. The following extract from a law of the revised code, intituled an act for regulating conveyances,...
I thank you sincerely for several letters, which my vagrant life between this place and Richmond upon business has prevented me from acknowledging in due season. The amendments, proposed by you, are much approved by the strong fœderalists here and at the Metropolis; being considered as an anodyne to the discontented. Some others, equally affectionate to the union, but less sanguine, expect to...
I am told, that within these few days a considerable quantity of Madeira wine has been run into Virginia in the face of day; and that the opinion of the bar is, that neither law nor court exists, which can embrace the case. We shall have a total anarchy in the customs, unless you speedily forward both to us. The impost-bill, we are informed, has been matured into a law. We hear nothing of...
I this morning received your favor of the 15th. In my letter of yesterday, I gave you a faithful narrative of my situation. On further reflection I feel the propriety of the communication more strongly. More confidentially therefore do I repose myself on you. Colo. Parker seems to think (but I am persuaded upon grounds, in no respect tenable,) that the president expects applications from...
The day before yesterday I returned hither from Leesburg. There I was confronted with Mr. Henry, and for three days we lay along side of each other, with our best cannon in action. It was a diverting scene, taken in the whole. My client Chas. Carter must have been defeated, if a single point of four had gone against him; and to obtain one, every thing was tried in the way of assertion,...
I returned home three or four days ago, under the vexatious operation of a quartan. I have been correcting it by medicine and hope in a day or two to subdue it. I shall immediately upon recovering my ability to do business with propriety, enter upon and complete the statement of my introductory ideas in Phila. Yrs. afftely. RC ( DLC ). Docketed by JM.
As soon as I had recovered my attention to business, I entered upon the chastisement of my notes. But I found it impossible to retrace the subject, so as to square with the resolutions proposed, without the possession of those resolutions. But I have them not, except in a mutilated state. Indeed I have an apprehension, that were I to dilate the notes, I should mingle inadvertently much of what...
I am this moment labouring under a violent relapse into the ague and fever, which I supposed to be past; and should not [have] incurred the uneasiness of writing, but to convince you, that the arrangements, made in the higher and subordinate branches of the judiciary department, are sanctified in my judgment by the strictest propriety; and, so far as I am concerned, contain what is probably...
We arrived last night after much fatigue to ourselves and horses. Indeed I have not been free from a fever since Wednesday last. From the small opporty., which I had, to ascertain the opinion of Phila. on the subject of your motion, I am inclined to believe, that if the holders of securities, the merchants and others, associated with them, or dependent on them, were excluded, the suffrage...
In George Town and Alexa. your discrimination has, as it is said, few advocates. Dr. Stuart was my author concerning the opinions of the latter, Mr. Brook Beall concerning those of the former. But I collected afterward, from Mr. Laurence Washington, that Colo. Geo. Mason was strenuously in favor of your motion; and indeed what I recollect of his observations in convention coincides with this...
After a fatiguing journey we arrived here on sunday evening, when I found all my family well, except my wife, who, I fear, is incumbered with a dead fœtus of more than seven months old. I am endeavouring to ward off by medical aid the consequences of this event. She is now in good spirits, and therefore I trust, that the mischief will not be fatal. Yesterday I saw Colo. Innes. He informs us,...
When I came home, I found my family in a really deplorable condition. Not to mention my children, most of whom were sick, the situation of my wife was very alarming. She gave every symptom of a painful and dangerous abortion being at hand. It is now a fortnight since she was first confined to her room, and every appearance grows more and more critical. It is almost certain, that the fœtus, now...
The governor has reason to expect the death of Colo. Grayson in a short time; and therefore requested Mr. Wm. Nelson to know from me, what you wished, in a case of a vacancy in the senate. I have just written to him, expressing your decided negative. I was diverted yesterday by Mr. John Pierce of James City (the delegate) asking whether you had not become a methodist . After I had recovered...
My dear wife is not better, than when I wrote to you last. I expect something determinate in a few days. Inclosed is a copy of my motion. Had it been intended to bring forward a convention immediately, the thing was imprudently worded; because it contains many unpopular points. But as subjects of reflection for the people, they could not, I thought, be too pointed. I give you a duplicate, that...
I have been looking most anxiously for the second communication, which you promised me, as soon as you should have had an interview with the President. Many times have I endeavoured to break in an easy way to my wife the necessity of my return to N. Y; in order to try her spirits, should I go off. As often has she been thrown into an agitation of real agony. Prepared as I am, I would have...
I thank you for your last favor. It relieved me much. But an event of yesterday has given me a full view of my arrangements. Very unexpectedly a diminished fœtus appeared; manifesting, that it had lost every energy of life for more than four months. The gloom of our house is converted into general satisfaction, at the escape of our friend from the most critical danger. I have this moment...
What I now write, is not designed to impose any task on your friendship; because public duty forbids private favor. But I wish you to say to me, what I ought to do. The ardor of some men for the bank renders the hope of the land-law abortive: and this hope, which has for sometime past presented to me a prospect of emolument to myself, has alone restrained me from doing something on the subject...
Altho’ I have not put you to the expence of postage by inquiries after your health, I have not omitted to avail myself of information thro’ Mr. Jefferson. I learn with sincere satisfaction, that you have emerged from your late attack; but I wish, that you would prevent a return in the fall by an abstinence from study. I need not relate to you, that since the standard of republicanism has been...
I was engaged during the whole of the last week in the supreme court of the U. S. Our business was rather preparatory to some great discussions at the succeeding term, than decisive of any question. The amenability of a state is fixed for debate on the first monday in february. The state of Georgia applied for an injunction to stop in the marshal’s hands a sum of money, which had been...
Presuming, that No law, subsequent to my departure from Virginia, has changed the modes of practice, which prevailed during my familiarity with them, I proceed to answer the queries. 1. If A’s judgment stands, and B. goes to a new trial, A cannot repeat any offset or plea, which was used in his, (A’s) suit on the former occasion. Errors of the jury or omissions of the party will not be...
I am satisfied, that there will be great manœuvring about the place of congress for the next session. New-York seemingly declines a visit from them; but steps are taken to distract preparations in this state, and produce a kind of necessity to go thither, as being the only spot, where accommodations can be found at short notice. A precedent, too is much wished by some, for violating the...
Consul Bond has just notified me, that he has a draft upon me for 660 dollars, due to-day. I have 400, and am anxious to be precise in time with him. Be so good, as to lend me the remainder of that sum, which I can replace at any moment after tomorrow. RC ( DLC ). Dated 30 Oct. 1794 in the Index to the James Madison Papers , but conclusive evidence for affixing a proper date is lacking....
My mind has been occupied with the subject, upon which we conversed. It is immense, critical, and may form an important epoch. Think precisely & extensively upon it, and let me hear from you. I find, that what I expected to have been done was not. My note in Bond’s hands was paid; but the money was not delivered by the person, who ought to have done it, and consequently the money was advanced...
It shall be done. Put your name upon the check; it is not payable to bearer. RC ( DLC ). Addressed by Randolph. Conjectural date here assigned by comparison with Randolph’s notes to JM concerning his debt to Phineas Bond.
Mr. Fauchet’s communication about weights and measures goes to congress to-day. I inclose to you, as a private man, Rittenhouse’s opinion upon them; not thinking it proper to add that opinion to what is said to the house. RC and enclosure ( DLC ). RC docketed by JM, with the date “1794.” Dated 30 Oct. 1794 in the Index to the James Madison Papers . Date here assigned on the basis of...
I have forborne to write to you since my resignation, that you might be able to affirm, that in the ground, which I shall take in my appeal to the people, you have borne no part. For among the objects, which the President and his party have in view, one is to destroy the republican force in the U. S. A conspiracy, more deeply laid and systematically pursued, has not yet occurred; and in every...
For reasons, which I assigned to you on our interview near Balto, I have not written to you, since your sojournment at Phila. The inclosed notice presents a subject, not influenced by those reasons. It is a branch of the Phila. system, which underwriters, merchants and the devotees of the administration invariably inforce; and unless counteracted, will throw every thing at their feet. The...
The meeting, which I mentioned to you in my last letter, was this day held at the Capitol. Between 3 & 400 persons were present; a large proportion of whom were British merchants, some of whom pay for the British purchases of horses, their clerks, officers, who hold posts under the President at his will, stockholders—expectants of office—and many without the shadow of a freehold....
19 August 1796, Richmond. Introduces Edwin Burwell. RC ( DLC ). Written on a half-sheet, with signature clipped; a fragment with a Randolph signature was attached before the RC was given to the Library of Congress in 1937. These two pieces are attached to a separate sheet, at the bottom of which is written in an unidentified hand, “To the Hon James Madison / House of Reps. U.S.” A docket on...
Judge Claiborne, of the state of Tennessee, has requested me to introduce him to you. He is travelling on to Philadelphia, with a view to solicit the appointment of district-judge in that state under the U. S. Altho’ a young man, his pretensions have been marked by the opinion, prevailing there, of his superiority over his present competitors, who formerly contested with him the seat on the...