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    • Nicholas, George
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    • Washington Presidency
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Nicholas, George" AND Period="Washington Presidency" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
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It was with great pleasure that I received the accounts of your election; this satisfaction has been made compleat by finding so great a majority of friends to the new Government in the list of members. Do not its enemies acknowledge this to be a sufficient evidence of the disposition and sentiments of the people at large? I am more fully satisfied every day that the opposition proceeded in a...
Letter and enclosure not found. 29 June 1789. Calendared in the lists probably kept by Peter Force (DLC: Madison Miscellany). The two documents were offered for sale in the Stan. V. Henkels Catalogue No. 694 (1892), which listed items from the McGuire collection of JM’s papers.
Your favor dated in July came safe to hand, I thank you for the communications contained [in] it. I shall not trouble you with any remarks on any of the subjects as my observations will be of no use but will confine my self to the giving you such information respecting this district as may enable you to form a proper judgment of her situation; and as I shall never write any thing to you the...
Your favor of the 27th. of Feby. is now before me. The last act of the Virginia assembly on the subject of a seperation seems to have given general satisfaction. The opposition to that measure still continues but as far as I can hear the bulk of the people are in favor of it. Spain takes great pains to seduce our people to remove to their country. I have myself seen letters from the Governor...
Your favor of the 13th. of July would have been acknowledged before this if I had known certainly how to direct to you during the recess of Congress. All the real friends of the Union and the General Government must have been very much hurt by the proceedings of your last session. The Assumption of the State debts was I think unjust and also exceeded your powers; but I do not dislike the...
I have delayed answering your favor by Mr Brown until this time that I might have an opportunity of informing you of the success of our volunteer expedition against the Indians. On the 23d. of May in the evening Genl. Scott moved from the N. W. side of the Ohio with about eight hundred mounted volunteers. On the first of June in the afternoon he entered the Indian town. He was discovered that...
Mr. Brown left us so lately that nothing has occurred here worthy your notice since his departure: all that happened before he will communicate. Genl. St. Clair has called for a body of militia to aid him in his grand operations; the men have been ordered out by the County Lieutenant but I very much fear they will not go. The General Government have neglected to pass a militia law, and I very...
Your favor of the 24th. of Novr. I have received, but the one which it mentions as having been sent from Orange has miscarried. If Congress have the exclusive right by the constitution of passing military laws; their not having exercised that right cannot give a power to the State legislatures to pass laws on that Subject or give efficacy to their old laws. The adoption of those laws by...
Your favour by your brother was delivered to me by him in March, the business of the court and the convention have prevented me from thanking you for it sooner. We have formed our government which I believe you will think is not the worst in the union. It’s total disregard of property qualifications in the electors and those to be elected will not meet with your approbation. The most serious...
I wish truth would permit me to say that our expectations from our new government have been realized. The fact is that there seems to be a foundation laid here for a great degree of unhappiness. This is in part owing to the constitution, in part to the uncommon mixture of extraordinary character which we have amongst us. The constitution is I think defective and bad consequences have already...
I thank you for your friendly letters dated in March and August last. We have been in a great state of anxiety on account of the French, but our fears begin to subside and give way to our hopes for their success. Their cause is so good and their conduct in the general so great that we are naturally inclined to overlook their imprudencies. It is more than probable that many things which appear...
I thank you for your friendly and interesting communications of the 15th of Decr. The situation of America has become very critical and interesting. The part which Congress ought to act is consequently difficult and attendend [ sic ] with many dangers. But I apprehend that there is more danger from their not following the dictates of their judgment, than of their not being able to discern the...
I am indebted to you for your two last agreeable and friendly favors; the acknowledgment of that debt would not have been so long postponed, if [it] had not been from an expectation of collecting some thing worthy your attention. But after waiting some months I find the present moment as barren of important intelligence as any preceeding one. Our campaign has ended, and altho no calamity has...
Since my last to you I have been favored with one or two of your friendly letters, for which I am much obliged to you. The want of such matter as I suppose would be agreeable to you, is the only cause of my not writing oftener: for it is very much my wish, to receive your part of the correspondence, as often as I can. Our western and local politicks, have all been swallowed up by Jay’s treaty:...