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    • Lee, Henry
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    • Madison, James

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I have not heard from you for a long time but often hear of you. All ranks of people within my observation seem highly pleased with the govt. since its commencement & reckon far too much on the benefits which it may produce—these expectations will meet with disappointment, which may create chagrin in the public mind & renew clamor. The president is dear to the citizens beyond parralel or...
The last ler. I got from you shewed the little leisure you possessed, & together with other considerations induced me to decline for a time writing to you. Indeed occupied with matters of a private nature only, I am out of the habit of communication as well as conversation with political affairs. In my tour in the upper country for Mrs Lee[’]s health, I have as much as in my power attended to...
Mr. Burnley will convey this letr. by some one of the many of your county people now here with their tobacco. In it you will receive a letr. sent to me from Alexa. by Mr C Lee on the presumption that you was or would be here. The assembly have gone thro most of their business, & are now engaged in consideration of the amendments proposed by Congress, to the constitution. Some time ago Mr....
I beg leave to make known to you the bearer Docr. Morrow. He was early engaged in the service of the U States as a naval surgeon. He continued in this employment thro various vicissitudes, suffering extreme hardships, & acquitted himself with honor & reputation. He understands that naval hospitals will be established & wishes to resume his old employment. His knowledge, his amiability of...
Since your illness at Georgetown I have heard nothing of you, only that you had so far recovered as to proceed, until yesterday, when a gentleman from Alexandria told me that you had taken your seat in Congress. This information gave me pleasure, as it seemed to communicate your complete recovery, as well as because it assured me that you was executing your duty at a time which seems big with...
Before I left home, Col Lee being about to depart for Congress, I wrote you by him. Since my arival here I got your letr. of the 1st. March, & have had an opportunity of reading your debates in Congress. Your motion which underwent so much discussion & met with such a decided negative is pleasing to the landed interest in this Country, & very much disrelished by the town interest. It is...
I am induced to address you on a subject which violates the rule I had lately prescribed to myself with respect to our public affairs. A youth the son of Mr. Thomas L. Lee to whom I beleive you was intimately known met me this morning on the road. Bred to the mercantile line in one of the most respectable houses in our country & cut off from his expectations there, by the death of his...
I got here last night from a trip to the great falls, & met your letr. of the 4th. It is really lamentable publicly & privately that a gift of Nature so useful should be locked up for the want of 3000 £ this currency. Was I in possession I verily beleive that the money would be returned in the course of one year. Col. Bull formerly of Pensylvania now of Berkeley, who was with me yesterday, &...
In the forenoon this day I got here—soon saw the President & your affectionate friend Mr. Jefferson. The first has nearly recovd. Mr. J. & myself dined with him & as far as I can judge, no chance for 16 years opposes the happiness of the U:S from any event feared by us in N york. As to your corn which you so much prized & which Mr J. seems to reckon valuable & uncommon, the president says he...
During my absence the physicians attending our afflicted countryman Col: Fisher have after various examinations decided that he has no stone, & incline to think his disorder is what is called a catarhh, a disease in the neck of the bladder or prostrate glands. In this doubt & consequent anxiety, I have advised him to obtain Doer. Mcnights opinion, to do which with certainty your agency is...
As I hope on my return to Virga. to raise as much money as will pay off old Fairfax & put into our power the great falls, I mention to you my intention that you may lend as much aid as you can. I have ordered the deed to be made out to you & me in the proportion agreed on & have charged you with one fourth of the purchase. If the event turns out as I expect, I shall not only be pleased by the...
Soon after I parted with you, I left Phild. and quickly got here. My whole rout presented to me one continued scene of stock gambling; agriculture commerce & even the fair sex relinquished, to make way for unremitted exertion in this favourite pursuit—thousands even at this late hour entering into a line of life which they abhor, in order to participate in legal spoil & preserve in some degree...
The enclosed please to give to our friend Frenau. It contains a list of some subscribers to his gazette. We are all miserable here; the late defeat of our army engrosses every mind; please to tell me of any saving circumstances in this unhappy affair should the act. to the gen govt. possess such wished for differences from the one circulating among us. At the same time let me beg you to recede...
Mr James Marshall brother to our friend John is about going to London on business very important to himself. Proper introductory letters will be very necessary to him especially to characters political & commercial. For it may happen that the interposition of the first may be necessary to remove some difficultys which he apprehends. You know the merit of the family, the excellence of Mr. John...
I have your two letters Decr. 18h. & Jany. 1st. In the first you mention having given to Mr. Frenau my letter to him enclosing a list of some subscribers to his gazette. I lately saw one or two of the gentlemen who have not yet recd. their papers. What can this be owing to? The disaster in the West is it seems from all accounts without alleviation. Painful indeed to my mind is the recollection...
Snow on the ground for seven days past & now snowing fast. Good weather for wheat. Your letter of the 8h. with its enclosures got here last night, as did the previous one you mention some days past: My reply followed the subsequent post. I thank you for your occasional communications altho I do profess my chagrin & disappointment in the leading principles adopted by the administration of the...
I received last night your letter of the 21st. On reference to the post office the subscribers to Frenaus gazette found their respective papers generally. I have read with attention your remarks to my observations on the first clause in the reply of your house to the presidential speech & while I acknowledge the commercial advantages enjoyed by the states since the adoption of the present...
I have your letter of the 29h. Frenau’s Gazette you mention has not reached me, nor indeed have I for two mails got any papers from him. This precariousness in the reception of his paper will cramp the circulation of it. For which I am exceedingly sorry as it is rising fast into reputation. Innes is so pleased with the attention of the editor to political matters and to the independence...
I had the pleasure last night to receive your letter of the 28h. March with the newspapers enclosed. In the various doings of Congress there detailed it plainly appears that very little regard is paid to the minds of their constituents. In every transaction something occurs which excites suspicion of an undue influence or a latent design inimical to the intention and true spirit of the...
I have your two letters of the 6th & 11th. The last communicated the appointment of commander in cheif of the W. A. This event has excited general astonishment here, and will be illy received I fear where the public good demands it should be otherwise received. I sincerely hope the new general may give peace to our country, and restore the honor of the American name. Altho the common report...
Some few days after my late domestic calamity which stings me to the quick, I left this place on a visit to the southwestern frontier in obedience to the dutys of my present office, & therefore never got your letr. of July 22d. until my return. It would not have been in my power to have made the trip you suggest, altho my desire of seeing you would have been a powerful incitement. From the...
In obedience to the direction of the General Assembly I transmit a copy of the resolutions passed by that honorable body respecting the late unexpected decision of the supreme Court of the United States which asserts that Court’s right of Jurisdiction in all controversies wherein a State may be a party, and I flatter myself that the request of the General Assembly will receive from you firm...
I had the pleasure my dear sir to receive your letter by Mr. Adair & shall pay every attention to that gentleman. He seems to be a man of letters & a man of worth. We hear nothing here but what must be known to you. A report has prevailed for some days past that Mr. Randolph is appointed Secretary of State, Lewis Attorney general & Mr Genet recalled. The conduct of the latter gentleman is so...
I hear with real joy that you have joined the happy circle & that too in the happiest manner. To your lady present my most respectful congratulations. She will soften I hope some of your political asperitys. The day which blessed you cursed me. I left my family to join the troops destined to restore order in Pensylvania. What a cursed event, who could have supposed such a disaster possible in...
6 June 1795, Richmond. Introduces Mr. Hopkins, “a gentleman from Newyork on a visit to our western country.” RC ( NjP ). 1 p. Directed by Lee to “Mr Madison,” but recipient’s identity is uncertain.