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    • Jones, Joseph
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Jones, Joseph" AND Period="Washington Presidency" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
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No safe opportunity offering, the letter for Mr. Nelson has not been forwarded, and I shall now reserve it for him untill the chancery term commences which will be in a day or two —those from Mr. Jefferson have been attended to, the one to Dr. Currie I have delivered, that for Mr. Lewis met a ready conveyance by Mr. Bob Nelson who was here, when it came to hand, on his way to Charlottesville,...
We have heard much of the di[s]agreement between the two Houses respecting titles and the rules to be established for their correspondence—if report speaks truth they have manifested a strong desire for titles and pre-eminence—how comes it that the doors where the Senate sit in their legislative capacity are shut and those of the representatives open—it appears to be equally proper and...
We have nothing in this quarter worth mentioning or I should more frequently make communications. I conclude you receive our papers regularly or would inclose them weekly. Although the proceedings of the House of representatives on the impost bill produced some remarks and altercation respecting its equality and policy yet I think the disputes appr. to have somewhat more of warmth respecting...
I thank you for the copy of the amendments proposed to the constitution which you lately inclosed to me —they are calculated to secure the personal rights of the people so far as declarations on paper can effect the purpose, leaving unimpaired the great Powers of the government—they are of such a nature as to be generally acceptable and of course more likely to obtain the assent of Congress...
Yours by Mr. Hopkins with the journal inclosed has been received and the journals as you desired delivered to Mr. Randolph who requests me to return you his thanks—that of the 21t. is also come to hand. I have seen a copy of the bill establishing the judiciary and from the cursory reading I have given it the different powers and jurisdictions of the Courts would have been more clearly seen had...
Mr. Christopher Roane, who is a searcher at City Point, requests to be introduced to you. He would wish to continue in office . He is a man of great integrity, and has conducted himself well as a Searcher. He was an officer during the late war. Your assistance, in continuing him in office, will, I think, be of service to him, & of advantage to our country, if appointed; he appears to me, to be...
My excursions during the sickly season deprived me of the pleasure of continuing our correspondence which should have been sooner resumed on my part after my return had I not expected on the adjournment of congress you wod. have left N. York—but hearing you were not returned to Virginia I take occasion by Mr. Griffin to drop you a few lines. The Assembly are as usual moving slowly in the...
I have avoided opening my usual correspondence with you from a conviction in my own mind that any communications I could make would be uninteresting to you and occasion a waste of your time that might be otherwise more usefully employed in prosecuting your labours in the public service, more especially as I take it for granted Mr. Fenno gives us a pretty authentic detail of the proceedings in...
Finding from Mr. Fennos account of your Proceedings that the Session of Congress is near its termination and taking it for granted you will visit Virginia soon after it closes, I cannot avoid communicating to you my wish you would endeavour to take Fredericksburg in your way home, and to inform me about what time you think you shall return, and whether I may expect the pleasure of seeing you....
The receipt of your letter of the 29th. ult. gave me a sensible pleasure as it recommences a correspondence too long intermitted between friends in which predicament I am very certain we very sincerely hold each other and between whom a more frequent intercourse should if practicable prevail than has lately done—for it I chiefly blame myself, and you only for availing yourself in too great a...
I have recd. your letter of the 21st. last month and thank you for the communications it contains. Unquestionably the Secretary of State would have been a preferable arrangemt. to the one provided for by the act in case of a vacancy in the Executive office—whatever may be said in favor of the pro. tem. president of the Senate or Speaker of the H. R. as Officers (and it will be difficult to...
I have your favor of the 13th. and thank you for the communications it contains. However necessary the present armament may be for a vigorous prosecution of the war agt. the Indians it will I think be difficult to shew a good pretence for continuing the present number of regulars beyond the period of accommodation. So long as the British remain in possession of the Posts, or perhaps were they...
I am at this time so much engaged in preparing for my western Journey that I cannot satisfy you by a more accurate statement than I have proposed—your retaining forty pounds and delivering the balance to Monroe will I am persuaded be no injury to me it will rather fall on yourself as I am inclined to think an accurate settlemt. wod. make the balance larger—let it suffice for the present and on...
Abstract. 15 October 1792. John Taliaferro Brooke, having purchased lot 127 in Fredericksburg, Virginia, from James Monroe and Eliza his wife, conveys that lot to Robert Mercer for £435. Witnessed by JM, John Minor, Jr., and Joseph Jones. Recorded 8 Nov. 1792. Printed extract (Crozier, Virginia County Records: Spotsylvania County , p. 456).
I thank you for your letters with the papers inclosed. It appears from the accounts I have seen that Mr. A. will be reelected and I think and have heretofore expressed that opinion to Monroe that the investigation of his opinions and their tendency was not commenced in time to make the impression on the Public mind that was necessary to effect a change—nor do I think his conduct in office (if...
I have recd. your favor inclosing the Papers containing the late important and agreeable intelligence from Europe. The affairs of France have taken a very favorable turn and bid fair to establish the new republic. I agreeable to your request, forwarded the papers to Mr. Ambrose Madison under the care of Mr. J. Blair who promised they shod. have the earliest conveyance. This day is set apart...
I have received your letters with the papers inclosed and have delivered to Mr. Blair those intended for your brother to be forwarded by the first conveyance. The good fortune of the Frenchmen seems to be joyfully entertained by the Republicans in Boston and the public display of their joy will I hope produce a good effect on the minds of many of the people in that quarter and revive their...
I am to thank you for your several favors since the commencement of the session of Congress and also for a present of potatoes delivered by Col. Madisons Waggoner by your desire as he informed me—they are excellent for the year and appear to be of superior quality from the common red potatoe. As yet I do not discover that any thing has taken place in your house to shew or determine the...
I am much obliged to you and Col. Monroe for your alternate attention to keeping me informed of what is passing among you and furnishing the papers of which at present I receive none but what you and he inclose me. I must subscribe for one of them and suppose Dunlap and Claypole the best but think the expence will be great for a newspaper if the postage is pd. by the Subscriber. As yet I do...
I have yours inclosing a paper of the 20th. inst. which rather weakens than strengthens the report of the good fortune of the French in vanquishing and capturing the D. York & his army, and of the retaking Toulon—events if they shall be verified that cannot fail to make a deep impression on the British nation and increase the number of opponents to the prosecution of the War. The vote agt....
It has turned out much as I expected—there are few men who possess sufficient public spirit to relinquish or hazard individual int. for general good. British credit still maintains its influence and will continue to do so especially when aided by the monied int of this country, wch. will generally be in concert to prevent any measure that may eventually affect either. I fear the longer we...
It is with real pleasure I learn there is a probability of a favourable issue to the consultations in Boston on the commercial propositions. If, before Mr. Pinkneys communications are promulgated, the People of that City in general felt a degree of resentment to the unjust and unprecedented conduct of the British nation towards us, the knowledge that we have nothing to hope or expect from them...
Your accot. of the crops of wheat from this place to the little mountains is confirmed by almost every person I have seen and conversed with on the subject except Fountaine Maury who seems to entertain an opinion that the Crops below the mountain as well as in the upper country are much better than reported and greatly preferable to the crops of last year. My information respecting the crops...
I expected to have been with you before now but have been unwell a few days past wch. has delayed me. Anty. goes up with a few things to Monroes wch. I suppose will be wanting there while I am up. He brings all the Coffee that came here in the Matt package—package and Coffee weighed 38 lb whe. it was the whole that should have come I am uninformd. I have sent you a pine apple cheese which I...
We have long expected you and was apprehensive something disastrous had happened to prevent your coming up. I am sorry for poor Antoine’s situation wch. certainly demands your attention and is a satisfactory apology for your declining to leave home untill he is apparently free from danger. I delivered the pamphlets to Mr. Jefferson who was a few days past very well and to whom I shall...
I have your favor from Philadelphia and very sincerely rejoice with you on your late change of condition and safe arrival in the City. Present my congratulations to your Lady. The tea china you mention is here and shall be packed up carefully and sent by Capt. Lambert who informs me he shall leave this place Tomorow evening or next day for Philadelphia. Monroe must certainly be safe in France...
I last week informed you I had packed up the china and sent it on board a vessell commanded by Capt. Lambert (his name is Lambeth) who expected to sail the next day. He goes to the house of Lloyd and Sparks of Philadelphia. A spell of rainy weather that commenced while he was loading has detained him untill to day, so that you may expect him soon after the receipt of this letter. I inclose the...
Your favor of the 7th. I received on Friday evening on my return from Richmond. I am in hopes the China has got safe and sound to hand. I have not heard from Mr. Randolph but take for granted what you mention that the bill will be paid as he had accepted it. I promised no further application should be made untill we heard from Monroe although my engagements for him and some small balances due...
I have your favors of the 12th. and 14th. of the month with the Papers inclosed. It is somewhat strange we have no letters public or private from Monroe when so many opportunities have offered since his arrival and in particular the Corvette arrived at Baltimore with despatches for the Minister of France. The Republic appears to pursue her victories in all quarters and to bid fair to vanquish...
The inclosed paper will inform you on board what vessell and to whom consigned the small cask I send you goes—it contains Anthony informs me four gammon and one shoulder. I wish I could have sent you more and larger peices but you must be content with what and such as they are. I set out in the morning for Loudoun and Albemarle and shall not return in less than 8 or 10 days. Your letters to me...