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    • Dawson, John
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Dawson, John" AND Period="Washington Presidency" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
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You will be pleas’d to accept my thanks for the Journals receivd a few days since by mr. Hopkins, from whom I learnt the different subjects which engage the attention of Congress and the variety of opinions on some of them. You have it in contemplation, I hear, to adjourn in August. Surely you will not do this without recommending those alterations which have been so ardently desird by many of...
On my arrival at this place I found as I expected the attention of every person fix’d on the subject which I left before you. Different are the opinions of different persons. Some, who are interested are much pleased with the Susqh. Others reprobate the conduct of their representatives. While some consider the fixing on the Susqh. as a thing which can never take place—and the vote only a...
You’ll be pleased to accept my thanks for your two letters with the inclosures, which I receivd on thursday & saturday. By the papers I discover that the bill for fixing the Seat of Goverment &c was not reported on Friday morning, and I have been assurd by a Gentleman in this place , that the committee appointd woud not bring it in untill they had collected, and sworn in all their forces. The...
By yesterday’s post of receiv’d your two letters dated on Monday and Wednesday. The legislature of this state have pass’d an act granting to Congress the Jurisdiction of ten miles square on any part they shall please, not [ sic ] have said nothing relative to the Susqh. I lament with you the decisions of the Senate on the subject of amendments. This circumstance added to the combination formd...
By yesterday’s post of receivd your favour of Friday. Shou’d Trenton be substituted by the Senate I apprehend that your house will not agree to the amendments, and consequently the bill will be lost, and the question as to the permanent seat left open. This I have expected for some time woud be the fate of the business, and upon the whole I do not know but it is the best course it can take....
I take the liberty of forwarding to you two resolutions which have pass’d both houses, on the subject of the permanent seat of the General Goverment. To the first of these there was considerable opposition from the South side of James river, under an apprehension that it woud not be advantageous to that part of the State; and from some of the Antis who considerd it as a favour to Congress—they...
You’ll be pleasd to accept my thanks for your favour of the 31st ulto which I recievd in due time. I am by no means astonishd at the reports of the two Secretaries given rise to a variety of opinions. The subjects to which they refer are both incricate [ sic ], and the interest of different persons will induce them to adopt various opinions. Mr. Hamilton’s plan, altho it discovers knowledge &...
I am now to acknowledge with many thanks your favour of the 31 January. The hope of collecting some thing worthy communicating has prevented my writing earlier but I fear shoud I let this rule govern there woud be an end to our correspondence; sure I am I shoud not hear from you as often as I wish. I[n] this place where most persons are dealers in public securities your plan for a...
Accept my thanks for your letter of the 20th. uto. which I have recievd. By the death of our very worthy friend Colo Grayson it became the duty of the Executive to appoint some person to fill the vacancy in the Senate. Application was made to Mr. Henry and on his refusal to serve Colo Mason was unanimously appointed—he also declind and then Mr. John Walker was chosen—who I presume will be in...
I thank you for the information given in your letter of the 27th. uto. respecting the appropriation made at the last session of congress to pay certain arrears due to the officers & soldiers of the virginia line. The executive will readily cooperrate with you in any plan which will render a service to this class of our citizens & will feel a pleasure in being instrumental in doing them that...
I have been favourd with your letter of the 27th. uto. inclosing some papers for which I request that you’ll accept my thanks. I hope that the speculations on the officers and soldiers who were to the south at the close of the war have not been so extensive as you apprehended, and that the plan adopted will prevent the injury & do justice to this meritorious class of our citizens. Our clerk...
I am favourd with your letter of the 24th. ulto, & request that you’ll accept my thanks for it, & for your attention to the business with Twining. I fear that my chance for payment from that quarter is a very bad one. Shoud the bill give him any money I must repeat my request to you to secure some for me as realy it is an object of some consequence, & a debt which ought to be paid. I am sorry...
The Gentleman who will hand you this is a Mr. Austin, whom I take the liberty of introducing to your attention. He is interested in the establishment of a shot manufactory in this state, which the legislature has thought proper to encourage, & which promises to be productive of considerable advantage. Hi[s] wish is to get assistance from the general goverment in some or other—& I am confident...
I am favour’d with your letter of the 24 ulto. with a paper inclos’d, for which I beg you’ll accept my thanks. I am sorry that this assumption business is again reviv’d, altho in a less exceptionable shape than it at first appear’d. To my mind it is hideous in any form; & the zeal & perseverance of the eastern members discover how much that part of the continent is interested in its adoption....
By the public papers I observe that you have arriv’d in Philadelphia, & I trust in good health. It is very doubtful whether the present will be a very long or short session of the general assembly. The commissioners appointed to prepare & report on the laws of the state have not yet come forward—but it is said they will in a few days. Shoud this business be gone into, it will take up much...
You have returnd home I hope in good health, & found your friends well. Two questions divide the opinions of Gentlemen in this quarter. To what number of Electors is this entitled in the choice of President & Vice President at the next election? Will we be entitled to send a member to the house of Representatives in the room of Brown, who will probably be elected into some office in the state...
We have heard from several elections & have reason to think that the friends to Mr Clinton, or rather the opponents to Mr. Adams are generally chosen. Moses Hunter however is chosen for the Frederick district, who it is said will be friendly to Adams. Whether S. T. Mason or Colo Peyton is elected for Loudon &c is not yet known—if the latter it is to be feard that he will be for Adams. I wish...
I am honord with your favour of the 21st. inst., for which youll be pleased to recieve my thanks. I inclose you a list of the Electors of our state agreeably to the returns to the Executive. The member from the Berkeley district is the only one who will be in favour of the present Vice President, & he is indebted to the bad day for his election as he was opposed by Colo Smith. All the others...
Our correspondence has been discont[in]ued for some time, much against my wish. On Friday last Citizen Gennet passd this place on his way to Philadelphia. He appears to me to be a man possessd of much information, added to the most engageing & agreeable manners that I ever saw. He is very easy, communicative & dignified & will precisely suit the taste of our countrymen. All who have seen him...
Your session no doubt commencd on the last monday & the communications which you will have it in your power to make to your friends for some time will be very interesting. I feel great anxiety to learn what direction the politiks of the present congress will take & must solicit a renewal of our correspondence. The general assembly will probably adjourn in two days. Those resolutions relative...
Recieve my thanks for your favour of the 15. which came by the last evening’s stage. You cannot expect any thing new from this quarter. We all look with g[r]eat anxiety towards Phia. for a full disclosure of the very momentous communications made by the President. While G. B carri[e]d on the war only on our frontiers, the merchant, & all those in the middle secure country felt themselves very...
I have this day written a letter to our friend Colo: Monroe relative to the arrival and continuance of a British frigate in this harbour. The contents of this letter I presume he will communicate to you, & if with myself & many in this place you are of opinion that it is a subject that demands serious & immediate attention I am persuaded that you will interest yourself in a business wh may...
On my return to this place on saturday evening I haves [ sic ] favourd with your letter of the 31. of the last month, with its enclosure, for which I thank you. By the en[c]losd paper you will find that the situation of the republic of France is very flattering. I was in Suffolk when the sloop arrivd, & think that the accounts which she brings may be depended on—but presume you will by this...
21 January 1794, Richmond. Introduces Francis Goode. RC ( DLC ). 1 p. Francis Goode (1744–1795) was a justice of the peace and member of the Chesterfield County Committee of Safety in 1774. He represented his county in the House of Delegates, 1778 and 1781–82, and served in the militia as a captain, 1777, and colonel, 1787–89 ( DAR Patriot Index National Society of the Daughters of the...
On yesterday I recievd your letter of the 15. & on the day before wrote to you. The opposition made to the resolutions which you presented to the house can only arise from the two causes which you mention, & from the spirit of that party, which I am persuaded is ever ready to sacrifice the interest of the country, for the advancement of individuals. I trust it will prove abortive. If it does...
It was with much pleasure I heard by the last evenings stage that the first of your resolutions had pervaild by a majority of five in the house of representatives, & most sincerely do I wish that they may ultimately succeed, fully convincd of this important truth “that the nation which commands our commerce, will have a weight in our public counsels.[”] The thing cannot be otherwise. Some of...
I am favourd with your letter. It may have been politic to pos[t]pone the resolutions offerd by you, but realy I cannot at this distance see through it. On the last evening a meeting of a number of Citizens was to have been held in this place to declare to their representative their opinions of his vote. What the[y] did I know not but presume it will be immediately forwarded to him, & will no...
The last evenings stage brought me your letter & a paper of the 21. of the last month. Before it was not doubted here, that M. Fauchet was appointed to succeed Genet—had arrivd with the fleet at Norfolk & immediately proceeded on to Pha. & yet by the paper of the 21. it appears that he has not arrivd, & doubts are started as to this appointment. This affair appears involvd in some obscurity,...
I am much surprisd at some resolutions which I see in the papers brought forward by Sedwick. It woud appear that the fiscal party have all at once changd their ground. They seem to oppose the interest of that country, which heretofore they have advocated, & to provoke a war. The public mind appears a good deal agitated about war—all appear to which [ sic ] to avoid it if possible—but shoud G....
By this mail I enclose to Colo Monroe a paper containing an extract of a letter which I receivd from Norfolk, and which gives an account of the success of our brave & generous allies on the Rhine, which I hope may prove true. That the object of the fiscal gentry is to defeat any thing like a systematic operation of the trade of G. B. & to quiet the public mind I am fully persuaded, & therefore...