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misjudged the interest of our own Country in refusing to sanction a principle that might be productive of more extensive evils than those it was our aim to prevent. Neutral flag. As it is possible that another attempt will be made during the present war to establish the rule that free bottoms make free goods I ought not to omit the communication of the following anecdote. Soon after the...
I have hitherto delayed a settlement of the Accts: of Messrs: Pierce & Hudson, (the Witnesses who attended the Trial of Captn: Whitby) not having obtained the necessary Vouchers by which I might as certain what Sums were paid to them in England by Mr: Munroe. To this Gentleman I some time since addressed a letter upon the subject, and he informs me that what Money the Witnesses required in...
96. à James Madison 10 Reçu pour compte de Todd 234.54 MdBS .
Information having been recieved in October last that many intruders had settled on the lands of the Cherokees & Chickasaws; the letter from Genl. Dearborn to Colo. Meigs was written to have them ordered off, & to inform them they would be removed by military force in the spring if still on the lands. These orders remain still to be given, & they should go to the officer commanding at...
Memoranda for the President. Information having been recieved in October last that many intruders had settled on the lands of the Cherokees & Chickasaws; the letter from Gen l Dearborn to Col o Meigs was written to have them ordered off, & to inform them they would be removed by military force in the spring if still on the lands. these orders remain still to be given, & they should go to the...
It is with extreme Satisfaction that I do my self the honour to address you as President of these United States; to see Merit, Virtue & Benevolence thus rewarded, my gratefull heart cannot help to rejoice at; your indulgence & friendly Offices have saved me from ruin & my Duty & Inclination prompts me to pray to God Almighty that your health be adequate to the arduous task Providence has...
Mr Troups complts to Mr Madison—incloses a paper to which the names of several respectable gentlemen are subscribed—Mr T feels himself obliged to state to Mr M that he has taken this liberty with Dr Kirkpatrick without his knowledge & without the knowledge of any other with one exception than those whose signatures appear on it. Our friend Doctor Kirkpatrick retires from Congress under...
Unwilling to depart from examples, of the most revered authority, I avail myself of the occasion now presented, to express the profound impression made on me, by the call of my Country to the station, to the duties of which I am about to pledge myself, by the most solemn of sanctions. So distinguished a mark of confidence, proceeding from the deliberate and tranquil suffrage of a free and...
4 March 1809, New Boston, New Hampshire. Has invented a system of medicine that will cure soldiers and sailors “of all camp sicknesses” and seeks a government subsidy to manufacture and bottle his medicines. “I hope if I have done no other good by writing this letter it will be pleasing to your phylanthropick mind to be informed of the thriving of us[e]ful arts in our land so as to prevent the...
4 March 1809, Newark. Congratulates JM on becoming president and anticipates “the same moderate, prudent, & pacific course” as that pursued by Jefferson. Expresses regret that the times are “fraught with great peril” brought on by “the folly and arrogance of one belligerent, & the commercial cupidity of the other.” If the choice comes to “honorable war or tame submission, we hesitate not, to...
4 March 1809. With Dr. John Thomas presiding and Cornelius Comegys serving as secretary the citizens offer JM congratulations upon his taking “the presidential chair” and hail the continuance of republicanism as it was practiced under President Jefferson. “Although a wise and just policy has thus preserved us from the political vortex of Europe,” the war now waging there constitutes a threat...
Document not found. 4 March 1809, Lancaster, Kentucky. Acknowledged in JM to the chairman of the meeting, 29 Apr. 1809 . A set of resolutions lauding JM on his inauguration and expressing a willingness to support the administration against foes at home and abroad.
I send you a march which I composed in your honor, I take the liberty to offer it to you as the tribute of a Stranger to your eminent talents and patriotism which brought you to the first seat of these united States. It is only a march, but in the scale of society, who pay his Share of talents and usefulness to the common good, has done his duty; as the head of this Enlightened Republic, I...
Yr. speech which reached here last night is so far as my information reaches much approved, for its modesty & generality & reserve of promises. A few think you might have well avoided that positive decleration about impartiality of the late admn. to foreign nations, as the public mind is divided on that question & the published state documents authorize a great deal to be said in contradiction...
J. Madison presents his compts. to Mr. Adams & asks the favor of a call on him at his house this morning for a few minutes, as he may be passing to the Capitol Hill. As J. M. may happen at the moment to be at the President’s House, it may perhaps be as well for Mr. Adams to take that in his way. RC ( MHi : Adams Papers). Docketed by Adams, who noted: “Same day—recd.” JM nominated Adams to be...
J. Madison requests the favor of Mr. Rodney to meet at his house tomorrow at 11 o. c. the other members of the Administration for the purpose of a consultation. Printed copy (Goodspeed Catalogue No. 369 [1943], item 1126).
To the Senate of the United States. I nominate Robert Smith now Secretary of the Navy to be Secretary of State. William Eustis of Massachusetts to be Secretary of War. John Quincey Adams of Massachusetts to be Minister Plenipotentiary to the court of St. Petersburg. Thomas Sumpter Junr. of South Carolina to be Minister Plenipotentiary to the court of Rio Jeneiro. Henry Hill of New York to be...
Very seldom did I ever ask the attention of the President of the U States to any Candidate for office in those days when my recommendation would have weight. Nor should I now do it, was I not thoroughly convinced from my long knowledge of yr. goodness that you would take pleasure when proper, to recollect those who have been like myself always personally attached to you, especially when they...
James W. Moss e[s] quire now of Mason County in this State has made some arrangements to move to that part of the Indiana Territory which appears by a late law of Congress to be made a Separate Territory. He has suggested to me a wish to recieve some secondary appointment in the Illinois Territory, such as Secretary, Register or reciever of public Monies or indeed any other you might please to...
6 March 1809, Hager’s Town. The “republican Citizens” of Washington County met at the courthouse on 4 Mar. to celebrate the eighth anniversary of the day when “ correct principles ” triumphed over “a party , whose obnoxious measures whilst in power deservedly lost them the confidence of the people; and also to celebrate this day , upon which Jas. Maddison is exalted to the presidential chair.”...
The enclosed commission will inform you that I have taken the liberty to nominate you to fill the Office of Secretary of War, vacated by the resignation of General Dearborn, and that the Senate have compleated the appointment. I transmit the Commission with a hope that I shall have the pleasure of learning that your Country will have the benefit of your services in that important station. I...
Before this you will have seen the proceedings of the Legislature of this State. It is with much satisfaction I inform you that they are read with indignation and abhorrence by evry friend of the administration. There is but one sentiment among us that they are treasonable in principle. I am confident many very many of our opponents will not justify the measures. We will support the...
The undersigned practising Attornies at law within the Mississippi Territory beg leave respectfully to represent to your excellency that they Consider it Compatible with the privileges of free men to express their Opinions on Subjects interesting to themselves; and the Community in which they live. They have learned that one of the Judges of this Territory has resigned and that, that office is...
James Madison , President of the United States of America To all to whom these Presents shall come, Greeting — Whereas it has been made to appear to me that a certain Negro lad, named Nathan , was, at a Circuit Court of the United States , for the county of Washington in the District of Columbia, holden in December last, duly convicted of a burglary by him committed in the house of Francis...
I hope you will pardon me for soliciting your interposition in favor of the bearer hereof, my son Walter G. Anderson who has been in the Navy of the United States for about six years, which service he did not wish to quit, but from a severe stroke of the paralytic his physicians advise him to do so, and as his narrow circumstances render employment of some kind absolutely necessary, your...
8 March 1809, London. He has written Lord Grenville regarding inconsistencies in the parliamentary debates over the naval blockade, the enforcement of which has exceeded “the rule of the War of 1756.” He attended the debates where Rose and Canning spoke, the latter saying with “the most consummate Impudence” that he would not discuss the state of American negotiations. Joy took “copious Notes”...
Agreeably to your instructions, I have made arrangements to provide the most necessary articles of furniture required for the President’s house. The first and most expensive of these are Looking Glasses of large dimensions. I have already purchased conditionally 3 pair, the largest of which is 8 ft. 6 in in highth, and I have in view one other pair, of very considerable highth & width. The...
It might be expected that a woman & a stranger shou’d apologize for the freedom of addressing The President Of The United States—but, my dear Sir, I never made an apology in my life, and it wou’d take me longer to frame one than to write the petition which will be the subject of this address. It is in behalf of Col Burr—to whom it is but just to declare, that I act without his authority, or...
Prevented by a severe cold from paying You my Congratulations, personally, on the 4th of March, I requested our mutual Friend Mr Deblois to present them, hoping, ere’ this day, to have had the pleasure of renewing them myself. As the weather & roads still keep me from that satisfaction, I cannot longer delay begging You to accept my sincere professions of Joy on Your being placed at the Head...
11 March 1809, London. Reports that at least eight ships from America have recently arrived in a British port in violation of the Embargo. Seeks appointment for himself and Samuel Williams as commercial agents for U.S. in London. Williams is known as an honorable man on the exchange and would be a valuable representative, particularly if Joy’s business took him elsewhere. RC ( DNA : RG 59,...
11 March 1809, New Orleans. Congratulates JM upon his inauguration and asks for the same “Solicitude paternelle” for the convent’s work in educating the young as was enjoyed during the Jefferson administration. RC ( DLC ). 2 pp. Written in French and signed: “ Sr. de St. Xavier farjon / Superieure des Religieuses ursuline .” Docketed by JM. Enclosed in W. C. C. Claiborne to JM, 20 Mar. 1809 .
Immediately after the affair of the Chesapeake (July 4th.) I went to Mr. Jefferson, making him a tender of my personal services. As our country seems yet to be menaced by foreign powers, I still hold it my duty to continue that offer, which I now do to you as President of the United States. I do it the more cheerfully because I am not unknown to you personally. I shall always feel a sincere...
Previously to the establishment of arrangements for carrying on the work during the ensuing Season, I beg to lay before you a proposition of which I hope to receive your approbation, and which I beg specially to explain on account of the personal interest I appear to have in it. Independently of my Salary, the expenses of the direction of the public works have been, Salary of the Clerk of the...
Altho’ I have been very tardy in acknowledging your favors of Jany. 17 & 24th. and the very valuable present from Mrs. E. Livingston, I am not the less sensible of them. I pray you to tender her in my behalf, my sincerest thanks for such a token of her kindness. The cloth has been highly admired both for the manufacture, of which she has the merit, and for the material which affords a specimen...
Although I have not the honor of a personal acquaintance with you, duty and affection prompt me to address you, in sincere Congratulation, on the triumph of principal, in the recent Election of President, and Vice President, of the United States. Having been Contemporary, with Hancock, the Adams’s, Warrens and others, in the Councils of this now State, in those “times which tried mens souls,”...
Retired as I live from the political World, and devoted as I am Obliged to be to the duties of my profession, I have not been an indifferent Spectator of the events Which have elevated you to the Chair of the United States. Permit me to express, not only the pleasure I feel in common with a great majority of your fellow Citizens, but to unite my Congratulations with those of your early and...
Letter not found. 13 March 1809. Acknowledged in Cathcart to JM, 12 May 1809 . Orders wines.
Letter not found. 13 March 1809. Mentioned in Edwards to JM, 18 May 1809 . Discusses complaints against Joseph Willcox, federal marshal for Connecticut, and recommends that John Brainard be appointed in his place.
I have been obliged as you will note to avail myself of your indulgence in answering your favor the 20th. Ult. I have looked over attentively your observations at the Cambridge Meeting, and tho’ I do not enter into the aptitude of all your observations, I perceive in them a very interesting view of our public affairs. On the question whether a publication of them would be useful, I am...
I had the honor to write to you unofficially & very much at large on the 12t Jany; it will not be necessary, & may not be proper, for me to trouble you at present in the same manner; indeed I am not able to add anything of consequence to whatever information is contained in my official letter to the secretary of State of this date: As I think it however proper to explain particularly the...
G Granger presents his most respectfull compliments to the President and, at the request of the Citizens of the County of Muskingum in Ohio, incloses for his perusal some resolutions passed by the Citizens on the 25th. of Feb. A copy has been sent to the Intelligencer for publication. At a meeting of a respectable number of the Citezens of the County of Muskingum and State of Ohio agreeable to...
The plan on which the Presidents square is proposed to be planted having been approved by the late President U.S. I had given the necessary directions prior to the 4th. of March last. The principal work which will be done during my departure will be the planting of trees & shrubs near the outer Wall as far as the Ground is finished, the manuring such parts as were omitted on account of the...
I solicit your directions as to the adaptation of the rooms in the East end of the President’s house to the use of the President and the Secretaries in Cabinet Council. If the first room occupied by Mr Coles as a sitting room be considered as sufficiently large for this use, supposing that used as the bedchamber to contain the Books & papers not in constant use, it would save much delay,...
At a Period, the most eventful ever witnessed by Man, when the whole civiliz’d World is engag’d in War —a War in which much of the Blood of Europe has fed the arid Lands of the South, or been congeald upon the frozen surface of the North; whilst the British Lion, and the Gallic Cock, emulous for the extent of outrages on the Law of Nations and the Rights of Neutrals, seem determind that the...
14 March 1809, Norwich, Vermont. Buck [a former Federalist representative who had served in the House of Representatives with JM] advises the president to prevent a British incursion into “the Spanish provinces at the south” by sending U.S. troops “and [by] energetic exertions to supplant the British, as well as the French, by the seizure of the Mexicoes.” Suggests that disaffection in “the...
Letter not found. 14 March 1809. Offered for sale in Charles Hamilton Catalogue No. 80 (5 Sept. 1974), item 275, which describes the one-page letter as a request that Armstrong obtain French permission to import merino sheep, noting that the letter reads in part: “The value of this breed to our Country is now generally understood, and acquisitions of specimens are acceptable services to the...
Your letter of the 10 of Feby. addressed to the President of the U. S. inclosing the proceedings of the Meeting of Citizens of Elbert County, having arrived after the expiration of the term of my predecessor, it devolves on me to acknowledge the receipt of it. And I can not do this without expressing the satisfaction afforded by resolutions breathing sentiments of so much patriotism, at a...
I have recd the resolutions of the 23d. of Feby. conveyed thro’ you, by the meeting of inhabitants from the Towns of Eden, Trenton, & Mount Desert, in the County of Hancock in the State of Massachts. The determination expressed by the Meeting to maintain the authority of the laws and the national rights, becomes Citizens who know their duty & love their Country. In referring the embarrassments...
To our Great and Good Friend His Imperial and Royal Majesty the Emperor of the French, King of Italy and Protector of the Confederation of the Rhine. I have received your Imperial and Royal Majesty’s Letter of the 7th February 1806 announcing the marriage of your much loved son the Prince Eugêne Napolêon with the Princess Augustê Amêlie of Bavaria which was celebrated at Munich on the 14th of...
Not being able to procure an appointment In the United States Service—I enlisted hoping by this to be promoted—I am now With B. Genl. W Hampton as Clerk—With whom I expect Very Soon to Visit your City—but this is not altogether Certain—If I can get either a Commission of Any Kind in the Army or Navy I shall be extreemly Glad as it is my Wish to be Constantly in the Service—If I cannot obtain...