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Some private business brought me to this City a few days ago. I have been absent from Orange about a month where I left our friends generally well. The principal change among them which I recollect is the death of your mother, of which as well as of other family circumstances, the inclosed letter from your Sister will probably acquaint you. We have been long anxious to get some information...
I have been favored with yours of the 28 Ult: and thank you for the paper which it inclosed. Your arguments appear to me to place the subject to which they relate in its true light, and must be satisfactory to the writer himself whom they oppose, if he can suspend for a moment his preconceived opinions. But whether they should have any effect or not on him, they will unquestionably be of...
I have recd. your favor of the 21st. instant, and have disposed of the papers under the same cover according to direction. Col. Hamilton had returned to the City which gave me the opportunity of immediately putting into his hands such of them as were destined for him. I have no doubt that he will make the best use of them. I have recd. no answer yet from my correspondent to whom I forwarded...
I have received and forwarded your letter and pamphlet to Mr. King. The latest information from Boston makes it probable that every aid to the fœderal cause will be wanted there. The antifederal party have found such reinfor⟨ce⟩ments in the Insurgents, and the province of Maine which is afraid of creating obstacles to her separation, that there is the most serious reason to apprehend the...
I have received & perused with much pleasure the remarks on the proposed Constitution for the U.S. which you have been so good as to favor me with. They cannot fail I think to satisfy the most scrupulous & jealous citizens, that the Act of the Convention, whatever faults it may have in other respects, is not chargeable with a dangerous similitude to real monarchy or Aristocracy. Col. Hamilton...
To Tench Coxe. Letter not found. Ca. 20 September 1788 . Acknowledged in Coxe to JM, 26 Sept. 1788 . Discusses the views of the Antifederalists. Refuses Coxe’s request to confide the names of the authors of the individual numbers of The Federalist .
I have received and forwarded your letter and pamphlet to Mr. King. The latest information from Boston makes it probable that every aid to the federal cause will be wanted there. The antifederal party have forced such reinforcements in the Insurgents, and the province of Maine which is afraid of creating obstacles to her separation, that there is the most serious reason to apprehend the...
No question has been yet taken by which the strength of parties can be ascertained. Each hopes for victory. There will not probably be half a dozen for a majority on either side. I hope & think that if no accident happens the Constitution will carry the point. But when the balance is so extremely nice, it is improper not to mingle doubts with our expectations. A few days will probably decide...
I have been favored with two letters from you, one containing 2 copies of the freeman, the other a pamphlet & letter for Mr. King. The latter will be forwarded this evening, as will also the former which did not arrive in time for the preceding mail. What goes by name of consolidation in Pena. is I suspect at the bottom of the opposition to the New Govt. almost every where; and I am glad to...
On my arrival which was the second day of the Convention, I found yours of the ult: the papers contained in which I have disposed of in the manner most likely to be of service. I should have acknowledged the favor sooner; but have not been well since I recd. it, and for several days preceding yesterday was confined to my room with a bilious attack. I am now able to resume my seat in the...
Your favor of the 27th. Ult: has found me so nearly prepared to set out for N. York that I should not have thought it worth while to acknowledge it from hence, were it not for the more speedy rate at which the mail will travel. I am glad to find your calculations for the House of Representatives so favorable. Others which I had seen held out a different prospect in the States North of...
I have been much obliged by your favor of the 23 instant, which I have delayed to answer, in the daily prospect of being able to include the decision of Congress on the place for the first meeting of the New Government. This point continues however unfixt. Perhaps it may be brought to an issue to day. From the result of the first question taken on it, the pretensions of Philada. bade fair for...
Letter not found. 20 January 1788. Mentioned in Coxe to JM, 23 and 27 Jan. 1788 . Reports unfavorable prospects for the Constitution in Massachusetts.
I have recd. the answer from General Washington on the subject of your memorandum to me, which I cannot so well communicate as in his own words—“With respect to the Sulla —before I attempt to give an account of the cultivation of it, and of the result, I must request the favor of you to apologize for me to Mr. St. John for not having acknowledged the receipt of it. The truth is, that until I...
Mr Madison presents his compliments to Mr. St John, and troubles him with another letter for Mr. Jefferson. Mr. M. has received answers to his letters on the subjects of the Crab trees—the Potowmac and—James River. It is doubted whether any Scyons are to be obtained in the neighbourhood of Richmond. If they can, (and there was a chance at one particular place) they are to be forwarded...
Letter not found. 1 April 1787. Mentioned in John Dawson’s letter to JM, 15 April 1787 . Apparently concerned the congressional resolve of 21 March 1787 which urged states to repeal all acts repugnant to the peace treaty of 1783 with Great Britain.
Being informed that reports prevail not only that I am opposed to any amendmends whatever to the new federal Constitution; but that I have ceased to be a friend to the rights of Conscience; and inferring from a conversation with my brother William, that you are disposed to contradict such reports as far as your knowledge of my sentiments may justify, I am led to trouble you with this...
I have the honor to inclose herewith a letter from Mr. Limozin of Havre de Grace. The external address to me, was made on a supposition of my being an attending member of Congress; and as I find from a note within the letter, in order to make me acquainted with the circumstances which were to be laid before Congress. With the highest respect and esteem I have the honor to be Sir, Your most...
Your favour of the 26 Ult: was duly handed to me by Majr. Drumgole. However important the object of his errand may have been, it has not been possible to take any step with regard to it. No authority equal to the business exists in the recess of Congress; and the Authority of Congress has been out of existence for some time, and if we are to judge from the present aspect of things, will...
Letter not found. 4 June 1788, Richmond . Gilman to John Sullivan, 12 June 1788: “A letter from Mr. Madison dated Richmond July [June] 4th contains the following observations—vizt ‘Mr. Pendleton was put into the chair without opposition—yesterday it was unanimously agreed that no general or particular question should be taken until the whole had been debated clause by Clause and the debate...
Letter not found. ca. 15 August 1787. Acknowledged in Grayson to JM, 31 Aug. 1787 . Requests Grayson to promote the appointment of Major George Turner to a position in the government of the Northwest Territory.
Letter not found. 29 May 1785. Mentioned by Grayson in his letter to JM, 27 June 1785 . JM to James Monroe, 7 August 1785 , notes that he had answered Grayson’s letter of 1 May 1785 with suggestions concerning the revision of Article IX of the Articles of Confederation.
Letter not found. ca. 7 November 1786. Mentioned in Grayson’s letter of 22 November to JM . Referred to the election of the Virginia delegates to Congress and inquired after Grayson’s health.
Extra[c]t of a Letter from a Gentleman in Boston of the 4th. March 1787. to R King— “—— has come back from Virginia with News that the Commissioners on the part of New York alarmed the Virginia Delegates, with an account that the Commissioners on the part of Massachusetts were for a monarchy ; & that those Delegates wrote their Legislature of it, who shut their Galaries and made a most serious...
Letter not found. 20 April 1788 . Acknowledged in Griffin to JM, 12 May 1788 . Requests pamphlets and debates on the Constitution to be sent to Jefferson. Requests copy of the debates of the Massachusetts convention.
Letter not found. Ca. 9 June 1788 . Mentioned in Carrington to JM, 17 June 1788 . Alluded to in Griffin to JM, 18 June 1788 . Reports his indisposition.
Letter not found. 25 March 1788 . Acknowledged in Griffin to JM, 14 Apr. 1788 . Reports election to Virginia ratifying convention.
Letter not found. 10 April 1788 . Acknowledged in Griffin to JM, 28 Apr. 1788 . Requests Griffin to send The Federalist No. 69 (No. 70 in the McLean The Federalist, A Collection of Essays, Written in Favour of the New Constitution, by a Citizen of New-York. Printed by J. and A. McLean (New York, 1788). edition), omitted as enclosure with his last letter. Adoption of the Constitution in...
Inclosed is the final result of our conventional deliberations. The intended address of the minority proved to be of a nature apprehended by me. It was rejected by the party themselves when proposed to them, and produced an auspicious conclusion to the business. As I shall set out in a few days for N. York, I postpone further explanations. I have this instant the communications from N....
[ Richmond, June 13, 1788. On June 25, 1788, Hamilton wrote to Madison: “I am very sorry to find by your letter of the 13th that your prospects are so critical.” Letter not found. ]
Our debates have advanced as far as the Judiciary Department against which a great effort is making. The Appellate connazance of fact, and an extension of the power to causes between Citizens of different States, with some lesser objections are the topics cheifly dwelt on. The retrospection to cases antecedent to the Constitution, such as British debts, and an apprehended revival of the...
Yours of yesterday is this instant come to hand & I have but a few minutes to answer it. I am sorry that your situation obliges you to listen to propositions of the nature you describe. My opinion is that a reservation of a right to withdraw if amendments be not decided on under the form of the Constitution within a certain time, is a conditional ratification, that it does not make N. York a...
Yours of the 8th. is just come to hand. I mentioned in my last that Oswald had been here in consultation with the Antifedl. leaders. The contents of your letter confirm the idea that a negotiation for delay is [on] foot between the opposition here & with you. We have conjectured for some days that the policy is to spin out the Session in order to receive overtures from your Convention; or if...
The Heat of the weather &c. has laid me up with a bilious attack: I am not able therefore to say more than a few words. No material indications have taken place since my last. The chance at present seems to be in our favor. But it is possible things may take another turn. Oswald of Phila. came here on saturday; and has closet interviews with the leaders of the Opposition. Yours Affely. RC (...
The Judiciary Department has been on the anvil for several days; and I presume will still be a further subject of disquisition. The attacks on it have apparently made less impression than was feared. But they may be secretly felt by particular interests that would not make the acknowledgement, and wd. chuse to ground their vote agst. the Constitution on other motives. In the course of this...
RC ( LC : Papers of Alexander Hamilton). Manuscript much frayed along its right edge. In JM’s hand, but his signature and part of his complimentary close are missing. In the left margin alongside the first four lines of the letter appears in an old-fashioned script, “A. H. Testifies the opposition of H. to the removal of Congress to Princeton, both before and after the event.” Docketed by...
Letter not found. 13 June 1788 . Mentioned in Hamilton to JM, 25 June 1788 . Describes the critical outlook for ratification of the Constitution at the Richmond convention.
This day put an end to the existence of our Convention. The inclosed is a copy of the Act of Ratification. It has been followed by a number of recomendatory alterations; many of them highly objectionable. One of the most so is an article prohibiting direct taxes where effectual laws shall be passed by the States for the purpose. It was impossible to prevent this error. The minority will sign...
Letter not found. 20 November 1788. Acknowledged in Hamilton to JM, 23 Nov. 1788 . Mentioned in Duer to JM, ca. 25 Nov. 1788 . Clinton may be a candidate for vice-president. The political prospects in Virginia are not favorable for JM’s election to the new Congress.
This day put an end to the existence of our Convention. The inclosed is a copy of the Act of Ratification. It has been followed by a number of recommendatory alterations; many of them highly objectionable. One of the most so is an article prohibiting direct taxes where effectual laws shall be passed by the States for the purpose. It was impossible to prevent this error. The minority will sign...
Inclosed is the final result of our conventional deliberations. The intended address of the Minority proved to be of a nature apprehended by me. It was rejected by the party themselves when proposed to them, and produced an auspicious conclusion to the business. As I shall set out in a few days for N. York, I postpone further explanations. I have this instant the communications from N....
Yours of the 8th is just come to hand. I mentioned in my last that Oswald had been here in consultation with the Antifedl. leaders. The contents of your letter confirm the idea that a negociation for delay is [on] foot between the opposition here & with you. We have conjectured for some days that the policy is to spin out the Session in order to receive overtures from your Convention; or if...
Letter not found. Ca. 10 April 1788 . Alluded to in Hamilton to JM, 11 May 1788 . Prospects for the Constitution in Virginia. Requests Hamilton to send copies of the first volume of The Federalist .
Our debates have advanced as far as the Judiciary Department against which a great effort is making. The appellate congnizance of fact, and an extension of the power to causes between Citizens of different States, with some lesser objections are the topics chiefly dwelt on. The retrospection to cases antecedent to the Constitution, such as British debts, and an apprehended revival of the...
The Heat of the weather &c. has laid me up with a bilious attack; I am not able therefore to say more than a few words. No material indications have taken place since my last. The chance at present seems to be in our favor. But it is possible things may take another turn. Oswald in Phila. came here on Saturday; and has closet interviews with the leaders of the opposition. Yours affcy. ALS ,...
Your favor of the 6th. of July by some singular ill luck never found its way to my hands till yesterday evening. The only part that now needs attention is a request that I will answer the following Question “What appeared to be my idea and disposition respecting the removal of Congress—did I appear to wish to hasten it, or did I not rather show a strong disposition to procrastinate it?” If...
The Judiciary Department has been on the anvil for several days; and I presume will still be a further subject of disquisition. The attacks on it have apparently made less impression than was feared. But they may be secretly felt by particular interests that would not make the acknowledgment, and wd. chuse to ground their vote agst. the Constitution on other motives. In the course of this week...
[ Philadelphia, November 20, 1788. On November 23, 1788, Hamilton wrote to Madison : “I thank you My Dear Sir for yours of the 20th.” Letter not found. ]
On the final question the Constitution was this day ratified by 89 ays agst. 79 noes. The majority is small but the proceeding has been free from every flaw & pretext of it; and the Convention as full as could be demanded, two members only being absent and those known to be divided on the subject. Recommendatory amendments will accompany the act of ratification. They are still [to] be settled...
Letter not found. Ca. 10 March 1788, Philadelphia. Acknowledged in Hamilton to JM, 3 Apr. 1788 . Discusses points to be raised in The Federalist concerning the judiciary.