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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Period="Confederation Period" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
Results 21-30 of 1,446 sorted by author
Mrs. Carr was informed by Mr Jefferson, previous to his departure to Europe, that he had requested the favor of you, to direct the Studies of her two sons Peter & Dabney in his absence. Should it be convenient for you to comply with Mr Jeffersons request, Mrs. Carr will be much obliged to you to inform her, when, and in what manner you would wish them disposed of. I am with great respect, Sir,...
Being neither acquainted with your Secretary at War, nor Doctor White the Superintendant for the Southren Department, I have taken the liberty to request your notice to the affairs of the Southren Indians which are now in such a state, that the Spaniards on one hand and other improper intruders on the other, may excite them all to become our enemies; or at best useless friends, whereas a...
An early acquaintance, a similarity of sentiment, and the deserved estimation you have attained to, in America, encourage me to address you on a subject, that is believed to be highly interesting to the Western Inhabitants, and perhaps not less so, to the eastern parts of the State. After various essays of the People for a separation, and the subject being agitated, both in Congress, and...
As few things in this life can go nearer my heart, than danger to the American Union. For some days past I have revolved in my mind the late intelligence from a Member of Congress, and some information, by another hand. I have also reflected on intimations I had from a friend in Ireland, which I think I give you a hint of last year: at times I conclude it the best policy that our leaders...
On my way to this place I met a Man from the Settlement on Cumberland River in North Carolina who had just come in by the way of Kentuckey. He informs that the minds of all the Western People are agitated on Account of the proposed cession of the Mississippi Navigation to Spain. Every person talks of it with i[n]d[i]gnation and reprobates it as a Measure of the greatest Injustice and Despotism...
Being cut off from the occurrences in the Assembly I have nothing to write you upon, but the prospect as to my reelection. The Apostacy of one of our Delegates in the Convention, and the wavering conduct of the other, have re-animated the Spirit of Anti-federalism in the County to such a degree that much work is to be done before my object will be secured —the issue of the ten days for which...
My going to Virginia this winter is indispensible. It is probable, from the state in which events has placed the delegation, that I shall not have an opportunity of going after the session commences without leaving the state unrepresented. Upon these considerations I have determined to seize the present moment and shall set out early in the next week. In the mean time I think it proper to give...
The Election for Senators came on yesterday and terminated as I gave you some reason to apprehend in my last—the Ballots were as follow: for R. H. Lee 98, for Wm. Grayson 86, for Jas. Madison 77 the whole number of Voters was 162, 62 whereof were given singly to you, of those Cast away Mr. H. got 26, and the remainder were distributed to many others. I am confident that two thirds of the...
The Gentlemen who have arrived from the Convention inform us that you are on the way to join us—least, however, you may, under a supposition that the State of the delegation is such as to admit of your absence, indulge yourself in leisurely movements, after the fatiguing time you have had, I take this precaution to apprise you that the same schism which unfortunately happened in our State in...
With great pleasure I received your favor of the 20th. Ult, but being distant from Town it did not reach me until about two days ago—the bad weather and other circumstances prevented my being in Richmond at the time of the meeting of the Electors—you have doubtless learned e’er this, that it was not my duty to be there—the antifederalism of my district would have kept out any person whatever...