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Letter not found. Ca. 14 January 1800. Mentioned in Beckley to Tench Coxe, 24 Jan. 1800 ( Papers of Tench Coxe [PHi microfilm ed.], reel 70). Encloses a copy of the Report of 1800. As Beckley explained to Coxe: “I have forwarded to Virginia such a full view of our situation and the necessity of their Assembly acting decidedly on the great questions of a Standing Army , Alien & Sedition laws,...
I lately received your letter of Ocr. 20th. 99. which gave us the first account of the death of your father; the preceding letter referred to having never come to hand, or it would have been duly answered. The land to which your enquiry relates lies in the State of Kentucky (Bourbon County) and not in Virginia, where your father had no claim known to me. The Tract contains 2000 Acres, and has...
Letter not found. Ca. 15 April 1798. Mentioned in Dawson to JM, 8 May 1798 . Requests that Dawson deliver a letter from Dolley Madison and pay $10 to Benjamin Franklin Bache.
Letter not found. Ca. 5 May 1798. Mentioned in JM to Jefferson, 5 May 1798 . Requests from Dawson a small balance—between $30 and $40—to be given to Jefferson.
Letter not found. Ca. 3 August 1797. Acknowledged in Dawson to JM, 13 Aug. 1797 . Gives opinion on the Blount conspiracy.
Letter not found. 3 January 1801. Acknowledged in Dawson to JM, 29 Jan. 1801 . Mentioned in George W. Erving to Monroe, 25 Jan. 1801 (DLC: Monroe Papers), and described in James Gunn to Alexander Hamilton, 9 Jan. 1801, as follows: “I have Seen a letter from Mr. Madison to one of the Virginia Representatives, in which he Says that in the event of the present House of Representatives not...
Letter not found. 13 May 1800. Acknowledged in Duvall to JM, 6 June 1800 . Advises Duvall not to make any public statement about Jefferson’s controversial letter to Philip Mazzei.
Letter not found. 24 October 1800. Acknowledged in Gelston to JM, 21 Nov. 1800 . Reassures Gelston that Virginia will cast all its electoral votes for Jefferson and Burr.
This will be handed to you by Mr. Altson [ sic ] of S. Carolina, who proposes to call at Monticello on his return from a Northern tour. He will probably be made known to you by other introductions; but those which he has brought to me, as well as a short acquaintance with him make me feel an obligation to add mine. He appears to be intelligent, sound in his principles, and polished in his...
At the desire of Mr. Bringhurst I forward him to Monticello; and make use of the opportunity, the first that has offered, to return you the pamphlet you were so kind as to leave with me. I add to it a late Fredg. paper which has got hold of some important articles of later date than were brought by the last post, and which may therefore be new to you as they were to me. I have had nothing from...
The inclosed letter for Mr. B. came to my hands last week; but not till the opportunity by the then mail was lost. I hear nothing of Monroe but thro’ the Newspapers containing his correspondence with Pickering . As that appears to have been closed on the 31st. of last month, I am in hourly expectation of seeing him . I am also without any late information with respect to the progress of the...
My last covered a copy of the Report on the Resolutions of last year. I now inclose a copy of certain resolutions moved by Mr. Giles, to which he means to add an instruction on the subject of the intercource law which has been so injurious to the price of our Tobo. It is not improbable that the Resolutions when taken up, may undergo some mollifications in the spirit & air of them. The Report...
Since my last I am in debt for your two favors of the 15th. & 22, the Gazettes of the 3. 6 7 & 8 Ulto, with a regular continuation to the 22d— two statements from the Treasury Department , and Payne’s letter to the French people & armies.—The President’s message is only a further developement to the public, of the violent passions, & heretical politics, which have been long privately known to...
Friday’s mail brought me your favor of May 24. The letter from S. Bourne had previously reached us thro’ a Fredg. paper. It is corroborated I find by several accounts from different sources. These rays in the prospect will if I can judge from the sensations in this quarter, have an effect on the people very different from that which appears in the public counsels. Whilst it was expected that...
I have let Col. Monroe know that you was furnished with a draught on a House in Philada. for 250 drs. and finding that it would be convenient to him, have authorised him to draw on you for that sum. I have also given him a draught on Genl. Moylan , of which the inclosed is a letter of advice. I reserve the note of Bailey towards covering the advance made by you, unless it should be otherwise...
The question on the Report printed, was decided by 60 for & 40 agst. it, the day before yesterday, after a debate [of] five days. Yesterday & today have been spent on Mr. Giles’ propositions, which with some softenings will probably pass, by nearly the same vote. The Senate is in rather a better state than was expected. The debate turned almost wholly on the right of the Legislature to...
I have recd. your favor of Mar: 2. with a continuation of the Gazettes, with an omission however of Feby. 23. I apprized you before of a like omission of Jany. 23. I think the Whigs acted very properly in attending the Birthnight on the principle of appropriating it to the person and not to the office of the late President. It is a pity that the nonattendance of the adamites is not presented...
Letter not found. 18 June 1800. Calendared by JM in his list of letters to Jefferson (DLC: Rives Collection, Madison Papers) as concerning: “Hessian fly, its first appearance in Orange.” Listed in Jefferson’s Epistolary Record (DLC: Jefferson Papers) as received 24 June.
Yours of the 3d. arrived safe yesterday. I will converse with Col. Monroe, as you desire, on the subject of his letter to you, & listen to all his reasons for the opinion he gives. My present conviction is opposed to it. I have viewed the subject pretty much in the light you do. I consider it moreover as a ticklish experiment to say publickly yes or no to the interrogatories of party spirit....
My last informed you of the result of the debates on the justifying Report of the Select Committee. I am now able to add that of Mr. Giles’s resolutions. The question on the whole was decided in the affirmative by a little upwards of a hundred against less than fifty. The vote was rather stronger on some of the particular resolutions, for example the instruction for disbanding the army. The...
Letter not found. 28 August 1799. Listed in JM’s record of letters written to Jefferson (DLC: Rives Collection, Madison Papers) as well as Jefferson’s Epistolary Record (DLC: Jefferson Papers).
I received the inclosed pamphlet from Col. Monroe with a request that it might be returned to you. The publication under all its characters is a curious specimen of the ingenious folly of its author. Next to the error of publishing at all, is that of forgetting that simplicity and candor are the only dress which prudence would put on innocence. Here we see every rhetorical artifice employed to...
According to a promise in my last, I inclose a copy of the rates at which McGeehee works. I inclose also a few observations on a subject which we have frequently talked of, which are submitted to your entire disposal, in whole or in part, under the sole reserve of the name of the author. In Gordon’s History Vol. IV p. 399–400, is a transaction that may perhaps be properly referred to in the...
I am placed under circumstances which make it proper I should inform you that Mr. Knapp of Philada. is a candidate for the office of Treasr. to the Mint, vacated by the death of Dr. Way, and is particularly anxious that you should be possessed of that fact, and of the testimony I may be able to give as to his qualifications and character. During several of the last winters I spent in Phida....
Friday’s mail brought me your favor of May 24. The letter from S. Bourne had previously reached us thro’ a Fredg. paper. It is corroborated I find by several accounts from different sources. These rays in the prospect will if I can judge from the sensations in this quarter, have an effect on the people very different from that which appears in the public counsels. Whilst it was expected that...
Yours by Mr Erwin was delivered by him, safe with the two letters inclosed. I forwarded them by him this morning, as you desired to the Governour. They confirm in substance the state and difficulty of the negociation as presented by the late Statement under the Paris head. The observations on the delays carried out by the Ex. and the favorable moment lost thereby, are interesting, and deserve...
My last to you was from Richd. Your last to me is just recd. covering the Bill for drawing Jurors by lot. The plan proposed by the Bill is a great improvement on the regulation in force here. I can not say, whether it may have the same merit every where. This subject was not wholly forgotten during our late Session. A Bill was even prepared on it, by one of our State Judges. But subjects,...
The Bearer Mr. Polk is a Portrait Painter & a kinsman of Mr. Peale of Philada. He visits Monticello with a wish to be favored with a few hours of your sitting for his pencil. Having no acquaintance with you he asks the aid of a line towards obtaining one, and this will be presented to you for the purpose. With perfect sincerity I am yours RC ( IGK ). Docketed by Jefferson, “recd Nov. ⟨3⟩.”...
The letter for Lumsden inclosed in your favor by Mrs. M. got into his hands in time for the inclosed answer from him. If the time & terms on which he proposes to send one of his hands be unobjectionable, I can venture to recommend the choice he has made. He appears to be really an accomplished plaisterer. I write a few lines by the present opportunity to Mr. N. and shall be at Monticello on...
I recd the inclosed pamphlet from Col. Monroe with a request that it might be returned to you. The publication under all its characters is a curious specimen of the ingenious folly of its author. Next to the error of publishing at all, is that of forgetting that simplicity & candor are the only dress which prudence would put on innocence. Here we see every rhetorical artifice employed to...
Your favor of the 1st. instant was to have been acknowledged a week ago, but the irregularity of the post occasioned by high waters has delayed it to the present opportunity. I have now to acknowledge your two subsequent ones of the 12th. & 19th . In compliance with the last, I had proposed to leave home in a few days, so as to be with you shortly after the 4th. of March. A melancholy...
I recd. by Bishop M. the 44. D 53. c committed to his care. The silence which prevails as to the negociations of our Envoys, is not less surprizing to my view than to yours. we may be assured however that nothing of a sort to be turned to the party objects on the anvil, has been recd. unless indeed the publication shd. be delayed for a moment deemed more critically advantageous. As we are left...
Your two favors of the 15 & 22 Ult: came to hand by friday’s mail. I can wait without inconvenience for the Sprigs &c. till you return & reestablish your Cutting machine. Mr. Tazewell’s Speech is really an able one in defence of his proposition to associate juries with the Senate in cases of impeachment. His views of the subject are so new to me, that I ought not to decide on them without more...
Your favor by Mr. Trist was duly handed to me, since which I have recd. the report on imports under your cover, & yesterday your favor of the 25 Ult: accompanied with the pamphlet & Mr. Nicholas’s motion on the Electoral Bill, which appears to be so fair & pertinent, that a rejection of it in favor of any other modification proposed, must fix a new brand on the authors. The spirit manifested...
My last was on the 15th. and acknowledged your preceding letters. I have since recd. that of the 12. under the same cover with the Gazettes; and the instructions & despatches, under a separate cover. The interruptions of company added to the calls of business have not left me time as yet to read over the whole of those papers. A glance at them, with the abstracts given of their contents, fully...
My last was on the 22d. Yours recd. by the last mail was of the 19th. instant. The despatches have not yet come sufficiently to the knowledge of the bulk of the people to decide the impression which is to result from them. As far as I can infer from the language of the few who have read the Newspapers, there will be a general agreement as to the improper views of our Executive party, whatever...
Be so good as to let Col. Monroe have the inclosed as early as may be convenient. Have you fixt the time of your setting out for Philada. I wish much for the pleasure of seeing you on your way, but if you do not aim to be there at the beging of the Session, I shall probably lose the opportunity. As something however may depend on circumstances & arrangements, it will be convenient for me to...
Mrs. Browne having been detained at Fredg for some time, I did not receive your favor of the 19th. in time to be conveniently acknowledged by the last mail. The succeeding one of the 26th. came to hand on the 7th. instant only, a delay that fixes blame on the post office either in Washington or Fredg. In all the letters & most of the Newspapers which I have lately recd. thro’ the post office,...
I have duly recd. your favor of 31 Ult: & am glad to find mine are recd. as regularly as yours. The law for capturing French privateers may certainly be deemed a formal commencement of hostilities, and renders all hope of peace vain, unless a progress in amicable arrangements at Paris not to be expected, should have secured it agst. the designs of our Govermt. If the Bill suspending commerce...
Since my last the Senate have agreed to the Report —& the Resolutions, by 15 to 6. To the latter they made an amendt. to the definition of the portion of C.L. in force in the U.S. by inserting the words “by Congress” after the word “adopted,” in order to repel the misconstruction which led the minority to concur in that particular resolution as it passed the H. of D. The amendt. was agreed to...
Mr. Trist left with me yesterday on his way home, the inclosed pamphlet which I return to him thro’ your hands, that you may have an oppy. of perusing it, in case a copy should not yet have reached you. I understand from Mr. T. who left Philada. on monday the 22d. that the prospect of a vote by Pennsa. was rather clouded by the uncertainty of the elections in one or two of the Senatorial...
Since my last I have been favored with yours by Christr: McPherson. It brought me the first agreeable information of the prospect held out by our Envoys. The posture of Europe, tho’ dreadful to humanity in general, will I trust enforce the disposition of France to come to a proper adjustment with us. And notwithstanding the group of daring experiments presented by our public Councils, I also...
My promise to write to you before your leaving Albemarle was defeated by a dysenteric attack which laid me up for about a week, and which left me in a State of debility not yet thoroughly removed. My recovery has been much retarded by the job of preparing a vindication of the Resolutions of last Session agst. the replies of the other States, and the sophistries from other quarters. The...
Your favor by Mr. Trist was duly handed to me, since which I have recd. the report on imports under your cover, & yesterday your favor of the 25 Ult: accompanied with the pamphlet & Mr. Nicholas’s motion on the Electoral Bill, which appears to be so fair & pertinent, that a rejection of it in favor of any other modification proposed, must fix a new brand on the Authors. The spirit manifested...
Mr. Trist left with me yesterday on his way home, the inclosed pamphlet which I return to him thro’ your hands, that you may have an oppy. of perusing it, in case a copy should not yet have reached you. I understand from Mr. T. who left Philada. on monday the 22d. that the prospect of a vote by Pennsa. was rather clouded by the uncertainty of the elections in one or two of the Senatorial...
My last acknowledged yours by Christ: McPherson. I have nothing new to add, but the accts. I have from the elections in a few neighboring Counties. In this Davis & Barbour have succeeded: in the adjoing one, Hill & Early: In Louisa Yancy & Garland Anderson Jr—in Culpeper the two former ones. You will probably learn from Albemarle that F. Walker & a Mr. Garland have prevailed agst. Woods &...
My promise to write to you before your leaving Albemarle was defeated by a dysenteric attack which laid me up for about a week, and which left me in a State of debility not yet thoroughly removed. My recovery has been much retarded by the job of preparing a vindication of the Resolutions of last Session agst. the replies of the other States, and the sophistries from other quarters. The...
My last covered a copy of the Report on the Resolutions of last year. I now inclose a copy of certain resolutions moved by Mr. Giles, to which he means to add an instruction on the subject of the intercource law which has been so injurious to the price of our Tobo. It is not improbable that the Resolutions when taken up, may undergo some mollifications in the spirit & air of them. The Report...
The last mail brought neither letters nor papers from Philada. By the preceding one I recd. your favor of Jany. 24. and a bundle of the Gazettes down to the 25th. inclusive, with an omission only of that of the 23d. which it may be proper for you to supply in order to keep your Sett entire. Your account of the probable posture of the negociation at Paris, is less decisively unfavorable than...
I did not write to you from Richmond, because I was considerably indisposed during my stay there, & because I could communicate to you nothing that would not reach you with equal speed through other channels. Before I left that place, the choice of electors in S. Carolina, had been recd. by the Govr. in a letter from Col. Hampton, and was understood by all parties to fix the event of a...