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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
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I accept very kindly the Address of the President & Professors of the University of William & Mary. The Reduction of the British Force in this State for which I feel myself highly indebted to the Noble Exertions of our Brave and Generous Allies, is a Circumstance which gives me great pleasure, not only as it affords a Return of peaceful Security to many of my fellow Citizens, but as it will, I...
Major McHenry—formerly an assistant Secretary to me, & afterwards Aid de Camp to the Marqs de la Fayette, informs me that Congress are about to appoint Official Secretaries for their Ministers abroad, & expresses a wish to go in that character to the Court of Versailles—or London. Justice, if I could divest myself of the inclination to serve this Gentleman, would compel me to represent him as...
RC (Princeton University Library: Andre deCoppet Collection of American Historical Autographs). Cover missing. In the hand of Washington and addressed by him to “The Honble Mr. Maddison.” Docketed by JM, “G. Washington Newburg. April 22. 1783.” Variations between the draft of this letter ( LC : Washington Papers) and the recipient’s copy are noted in nn. 2 and 3, below. Except for a brief note...
Can nothing be done in our Assembly for poor Paine? Must the merits, & Services of Common Sense continue to glide down the stream of time, unrewarded by this Country? His writings certainly have had a powerful effect on the public mind; ought they not then to meet an adequate return? He is poor! he is chagreened! and almost, if not altogether, in despair of relief. New York it is true, not the...
Can nothing be done in our Assembly for poor Paine? Mus[t] the merits, & Services of Common Sense continue to glide down the stream of time, unrewarded by this Country? His writings certainly have had a powerful effect on the public mind; ought they not then to meet an adequate return? He is poor! he is chagreened! and almost, if not altogether, in despair of relief. New York it is true, not...
After the several conversations we have had on the subject of inland navigation; and the benefits which would, probably, be derived from a commercial intercourse with the Western territory; I shall make no apology for giving you the trouble of the enclosed. It is matter of regret to me, however, that I cannot accompany them with some explanations & observations. It was intended these Papers...
After the several conversations we have had on the subject of inland navigation; and the benefits which would, probably, be derived from a commercial intercourse with the Western territory; I shall make no apology for giving you the trouble of the enclosed. It is matter of regret to me, however, that I cannot accompany them with some explanations & observations. It was intended these papers...
Gentlemen: I returned yesterday from Annapolis, having conducted the Marquis La Fayette that far on his way to New York, and left him proceeding on the road to Baltimore, on Wednesday last. This trip afforded me opportunities of conversing with some of the leading characters in the different branches of the Legislature of Maryland, on the subject of inland navigation, and the benefits which...
I returned yesterday from Annapolis, having conducted the Marquis La Fayette that far on his way to New York, and left him proceeding on the road to Baltimore, on Wednesday last. This trip afforded me opportunities of conversing with some of the leading characters in the different branches of the Legislature of Maryland, on the subject of inland navigation, and the benefits which might arise...
I have been favored with your letter of the 11th. The proceedings of the conference, and the Act & resolutions of this Legislature consequent thereupon (herewith transmitted to the Assembly) are so full, & explanatory of the motives which governed in this business, that it is scarcely necessary for me to say any thing in addition to them; except that, this State seem highly impressed with the...