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2 May 1801, Philadelphia. In compliance with request of the subscribers to enclosed recommendation, adds his endorsement of William E. Hũlings for consulate at New Orleans. Hũlings is qualified by experience, political views, “and his mercantile and moral character … for the appointment.” RC ( DNA : RG 59, LAR , 1801–9). Docketed by JM: “Hulings Wm. E. recomd. for Consul at New Orleans by Wm....
Jacob Mayer Esquire late Consul at Cape Francois for whom I have now the pleasure of addressing you, will visit the seat of government for the purpose of communicating with the administration on the subject of our affairs in that quarter. His long residence and intimate knowledge of the official transactions in that Island will enable him to develope the measures which have been pursued and to...
Letter not found. 6 July 1801. Acknowledged in JM to Jones, 13 July 1801 . Encloses memorial from Mr. Torey on appointing a consul at St. Petersburg.
Mr Chandler Price a respectable merchant of this City, with whom a friendly intercourse of many years has matured my particular esteem, has occasion to address you on the subject of the lawless depredations of British Cruizers on his property, by which he has sustained material loss and injury. Mr Price has requested a letter from me to accompany his communication, and I can assure you he is...
6 October 1801, Philadelphia. Introduces Robert Ritchie, U.S. consul at Port Républicain, whose private concerns have caused him to return briefly to Philadelphia. RC ( ViU ). 1 p. Cover marked by Jones: “Mr. Ritchie.”
22 April 1802, Philadelphia. Writes on behalf of some of his mercantile friends of Philadelphia who wish to recommend Isaac Cushing, “a citizen of the United States and resident merchant and partner in a very respectable House in Marseilles,” for the office of commercial agent at that city. Notes that because Cathalan is a French citizen, his “holding of the office of a foreign Consulate … is...
The enclosed letter I received in Augt. last and intending to visit the seat of government before my departure again for Canton I reserved its contents for the subject of a personal communication, and during my short stay at Washington called twice at the office of the department for the purpose, but your momentary absence and my private engagements deprived me of the pleasure of an interview....
§ From William Jones. January 1806. “The value and importance of the commerce of the united states with the port of Canton in China—the casualties to which our countrymen navigating those remote regions are frequently exposed, and the deep interest we have in that trade, we trust will sanction the representation we are about to mak⟨e⟩ on the subject of the commercial agency of our Government...
By the mail of this day I was honored with your private and confidential communication and while I am sensible of the distinguished proof of respect and confidence which it conveys, I regret my incompetency to the task of elucidating a subject of so much interest and intricacy; nevertheless my best efforts shall be directed to the investigation in the manner you desire and with as little delay...
Believing that if my view of the subject on which you did me the honor to ask my opinion could be of any use it would be expedient to transmit it without delay I have seized a few moments from the bustle of preparation for my intended voyage to give you in the best order and as correctly as the time and circumstances would admit my views of the several articles and in the order you prescribed....
The enclosed letter to your address I received this day from an american friend in Paris who is eminently entitled to my confidence and esteem. He speaks in the highest terms of the moral character respectability and intelligence of Mr. Robertson and of his attachment and devotion to our Country. I also take the liberty of enclosing documents authenticating the nativity and Citizenship of...
The enclosed circular is I believe the only one of the kind received here this day and as none of our papers have published it although it was here before noon, I deemed it of some importance to put it in your possession as soon as possible. I know not whether the translation be correct, but it appears to me necessary to enclose in a parenthesis the words “the vessels taken or detained before...
As information from respectable private sources may in the absence of Official intelligence serve to throw some light upon the equivocal policy of france in her professed cessation from the violation of our neutral commerce, I take the liberty of enclosing an extract from a letter recd by a gentleman in this city, by the Osmin lately arrived here from Rochelle, which letter was not delivered...
30 April 1812, Philadelphia. Recommend John Dayton, merchant of Philadelphia, for the position of consul at a “Port in South America.” RC ( DNA : RG 59, LAR , 1809–17, filed under “Dayton”). 1 p. Signed by Jones and twenty others, including Clement Biddle, George Latimer, Henry Pratt, and Robert Patton.
22 May 1812, Philadelphia. Transmits the proceedings of a meeting of the citizens of the first congressional district of Pennsylvania held in the statehouse square on 20 May. Assures JM that the “enclosed address and resolutions were adopted with the utmost unanimity zeal and determination.” 20 May 1812, Philadelphia. “The friends of the United States and of their Constituted authorities, …...
I have the honor to enclose to your Excellency a Resolution of the General Assembly of this State pass’d on the 8th Inst and in conformity therewith permit me to request your Excellency to give orders to the proper officer to furnish me with two thousand stand of arms & six pair of Field peices vizt two pair of six pounders & four pair of four pounders with such quantities of ammunition &c for...
Upon a presumption that my letter of July 22d must have miscarried I now do myself the honor to forward you a Copy thereof, observing to your Excellency that a supply of Arms &c &c as a part for which an Annual appropriation was made by Act of Congress April 2d 1808 is highly necessary, the reception of which would be highly gratifying to the State & very pleasing to me. I have the honor to be...
As it is possible my letters of July 22d & of August 22d may not have reached your Excellency, I am advised by the Council of War of this State to forward a triplicate & to inform your Excellency that in consequence of an Alarm by the appearance of three British Frigates near point Judith on the 13th Inst the Citezens of the Island of Rhode Island with a promptness that does them very great...
I am honored with your letter of the 12th Inst enclosing my Commission as Secretary of the Navy for which mark of your confidence I pray you to accept my sencere acknowledgements. Having seen my nomination in the public prints I had given to the subject the consideration due to so weighty and important a trust, and although I feel the full force of the responsibility proposed to be vested in...
I have the honor to lay before You, the proceedings of a Court Martial, held at Fort Norfolk, on the 1. aug: 1812—with the sentence of Death, pronounced by said Court, upon George Allen, a private of marines. And a reference to a similar sentence, by another Court Martial upon … Potts a private of Marines the proceedings of which, are not to be found, either in the War or Navy Departments; but...
I have this instant received a hand Bill from the press of the Wilmington Del. Watchman enclosed to me by the Collector of that place announcing circumstantially the capture and destruction of the Java (a British Frigate Mounting 49 Guns) by the Constitution Commodore Bainbridge off the coast of Brazil. The Java was bound out to Bombay with Lieutenant Genl Hislop and other officers onboard. 60...
The existing instructions from this Department rendering the Naval Commanders on certain stations subordinate and obedient to the Military Commanders is in my judgement fraught with consequences extremely injurious to the service and to the public interest. The first direct effect is that officers of talent character and spirit will not submit to the degradation and will decline or resign. The...
You will perceive by the enclosed letters that the note you sent for my perusal was written under a mistaken idea that the firing of the British Barges on the schooners captured in the mouth of James River was an action between our Gun Boats & the enemy Frigate. I am satisfied that the object of an attempt to ascend James River is solely with a view to draw the Gun Boats from Norfolk. I shall...
If water alone is their object they can get it with facility in the Potowmac without hazard, but I think the greater probability is that being correctly informed of the state of preparation of our ships at New york they may have gone to the Hook and to the East end of the sound in order to watch their movements. In the last New york paper it is said a Spaniard spoke a 74 with 7 other ships of...
I returned at 6 this evening much fatigued having overset but without injury. The roads are intolerably bad. My visit has produced a good effect—our friends at Baltimore are particularly gratified by the arrangements I have made, and those who are not of that character appear satisfied. It happened very opportunely as the enemy anchored off the mouth of the river yesterday, sent their Barges...
I feel that as a member of your Cabinet I ought to avoid adding to the number of solicitors on the subject of appointments and I promise you not to tresspass often. Permit me to say that I believe the appointment of Doctor James Rush as successor to his illustrious father would give as general satisfaction as that of any other; both on account of the merits of the candidate and the profound...
Will the President please to say what answer I may give to Mr Gray and if the prayer of his petition cannot be granted what reasons I may assign. I recollect that the distinction in Gerards case was that he had entered the waters of the US not knowing of the War and was taken and detained there until ransomed. I do not recollect the merits of the other cases to which Mr Gray alludes, but I...
Agreably to a Resolution of the Legislature of this State, pass’d at their Session the last week, I do myself the honour to forward you the enclosed Memorial, and beg leave to observe— That as the War in which the United States are engaged is particularly distressing to this State, and as the danger of an Invasion most certainly increases as War progresses, and the distressing privations of...
It is probable you may have seen the attack upon Commodore Murray in the Democratic Press and as he is the senior officer in the Navy of the U. States I deem it but just that he also should be heard and therefore enclose his letters and its enclosures for your perusal. The gentlemen to whom he alludes as being present I know very well they are worthy men and our political friends. Murrays...
I return the proceedings of the Court Martial at Sackets Harbour for your decision on the Sentence of dismission, of sailing master Hutton which forms an exception to the power vested in the commander of the fleet. See act. April 23. 1800 Vol. 5. page 121. art. XLI. I believe the Sentence to be perfectly correct. I am very respectfully Sir your Obdt Servt Permit me to observe that the sentence...
Extract from a letter of Capt. Sinclair dated Norfolk. May 16. 1813. I was yesterday evening at the Capes—where there were 4–74s. 5 Frigates—1 Ship, apparently a merchantman—2 Brigs of War—and armed Schooners, making in all 22 Sail. They are moored, forming a line up the Bay Channel and also a line across the Channel to Hampton Roads—just at the tail of the Horse shoe. These are the Squadron...
I enclose 11. letters received by the mail of this day from Commodore Chauncey. Nos. 17. to 27. The most material are Nos. 22 to 27. inclusive some surgeons and mates have gone on and others are going. Captain Sinclair is here and goes on in the mail tomorrow to take the command of the New Ship at Sacketts Harbour. We have had no Marines to send on and have not succeeded in recruiting any on...
The enclosed report is prepared in consequence of a call from the Chairman of the Naval Committee of the Senate for a return of the number of Gun Boats in service and their Stations, with a view as I understood him in conversation to propose an additional special defence for Baltimore of a number of Barges or Galleys which the City of Baltimore during the late excitement built and now wish to...
I send the enclosed letters for your perusal. James T Leonard was next in command to Com Chauncey until arrested upon charges of misconduct and is now under arrest waiting the investigation of a Court martial. I know not who was the commanding naval officer that so precipitately destroyed the stores, nor is it possible to anticipate the consequences as it respects the equpment of the New Ship....
I enclose for your perusal the official letters of Commodore Chauncey 27, 28, 29. June which the bearer will take to the printers after you have perused them if you think proper. I also enclose a letter from Com Bainbridge covering Commodore Brooke Challenge which I am happy Captain Laurence did not receive as the post mark is the day after the Battle. I also enclose Com. Decaturs letter. The...
I have pleasure in sending the enclosed letters which show that com. Chauncey has determined upon the course which you were so solicitous he should have done, and has thereby in my mind greatly elevated his Character as perhaps there are few Naval officers who would have resisted the temptation to exalt their fame! Have the goodness when you have perused to send the letters to my Lodgings....
At 4 AM I received the enclosed from Captain Morris and immediately came to this place to order the three scows armed with 32 & 24 pounders to take a position at Greenleaf Point and to order some heavy Cannon from the Yard to that place with every other means of defence in preparation. My opinion is that though the force is formidable the real object is to menace this place and to get Water...
21 July 1813, Navy Department. “The appointments, & nominations on the enclosed paper, are required to fill existing vacancies.” Letterbook copy and letterbook copy of enclosure ( DNA : RG 45, LSP ). Letterbook copy 1 p. The copy of the enclosure (5 pp.) lists 122 promotions and appointments in the navy. Notes near the end of the list read: “Transmitted to the President 23. July 1813” and “The...
My duty to the Nation, solicitude for the prosperity of your administration, for yourself a sincere personal regard, and anxiety for my own reputation; demand of me to state to you frankly my conviction of the absolute impracticability of my discharging the high and responsible trust of acting Secretary of the Treasury combined with the duties of Secretary of the Navy. The accumated [ sic ]...
The palpable and criminal intercourse held with the enemys forces blockading and invading the waters and shores of the United States is in a military view an offence of so deep a die as to call for the vigilant interposition of all the Naval Officers of the United States. This intercourse is not only carried on by foreigners under the specious garb of friendly flags who convey provisions water...
The enclosed is copy of a letter received this morning from Capt Perry. Thus Sir you see the vessels that were “built in a pond from whence they could not be removed” are afloat in safety on the broad Lake having passed the Bar in the presence of the enemy without interruption which I take to be an acknowledgement of inferiority. You will observe that the eight vessels which had passed the Bar...
Last night Coll Duval of Annapolis came up from that place in haste to see the Secretary at War who had left this place the preceding day. Col D. states that the enemy in great force are approaching Annapolis with the evident intention of attacking it and that Colonel Carbery had received orders from Gen Smith to repair immediately to Baltimore the execution of which had been suspended merely...
The enclosed extracts and copies from Com Chauncey & Captn Perrys letters and from the private letters of General Williams to the Secretary of War will convey to you the state of things on the Lakes. The prospect is propitious whatever may be the result. The presence of the British fleet on the Lake is I take it a desperate (but successful) effort to relieve the forces at the head of the Lake...
Mr Osgood the Naval Officer of New York is dead. The offices of Surveyor & Naval Officer are of course to fill. You mentioned Furguson Coffin and Heath. I enclose a letter from Mr Lefferts MC. to Mr Gale. Mr Alexr McComb father of Col McComb and former great Speculator is also an applicant for the Naval Office. Will you please to say which of the Candidates or what other shall fill the...
I enclose for your information copy of a letter from Mr Anderson Navy Store keeper New York who has been with Commodore Chauncey from the commencement of the Lake service. He is a judicious active man whose services have been very important and being in Chaunceys confidence he has a perfect knowledge of the past and present state of things in that quarter. I am very respectfully Your Obdt....
I herewith transmit the proceedings of a Court Martial held at Point Petre 19th July for the trial of Lieutenant Alexander Sevier Commanding a detachment of Marines serving with the Army of the UStates in that quarter—which resulted in a sentence of dismission from the service of the U States. I have reason to believe that an impartial enquiry into the general character and conduct of Lieut...
A letter from Genl Boyd and a private one from Genl Williams states that Com Chauncey lost two of his smallest vessels by upsetting in a squall and that by a sudden shift of wind the enemy were enabled to get between two more of his smallest vessels and the squadron but it is not known whether they were captured or escaped. They state however that Chauncey was still pursuing the enemy in order...
I return the proceedings of the court martial in the case of Lieut Sevier and upon reflection I think it will be better to remit than to reverse the Sentence and will be in conformity with General Pinckneys letter. Indeed as he has confirmed the sentence though stayed the execution I believe there is no other regular course but to remit. If you think to please say at the foot of the...
On the day of your departure from this City you directed the Removal of Josiah Weston Collector of New Bedford which upon looking into the Department I took the liberty of suspending for a few days as the usual course in cases of complaint against Collrs. had been adopted in this Viz to direct some trusty person to investigate the alleged grounds of complaint and report to the Depmt. The...
I have received a Despatch from Com Chauncey dated the 13th. at Sacketts Harbour where he had that day arrived with the Gen Pike, Oneida, Madison, Gov Tompkins, Conquest, Ontario, Pert, & Lady of the Lake; having left the Fair American and Asp at Niagara. He would that day take in five weeks provision and sail in the evening in pursuit of the Enemy. The aspect of this Despatch is unfavorable...