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    • Coxe, Tench
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Coxe, Tench" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
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I recd. your letter acknowleging the rect. of the three papers in the Gazetteer. At the request of Mr. Wilson, Dr. Rush and another friend or two I added a 4th. paper, calculated to shew the general advantages & obviate some of the Objections to the System. It was desired by these Gentlemen for the purpose of inserting in one of several handbills, which it was proposed to circulate thro our...
Mr. T. Coxe will be very much obliged to Mr. Madison if he can inform him what is the estimated amount of the debt of the Citizens of Virginia to the British Merchants; and, if he knows it, of those of any other state. He understands the following to be the debt of So. Carolina. Principal due in 1775 £ 2,000,000. Interest from 1775 to 1791 (deducting the 7 years from 1776 to 1783) is 9 years...
Your letter of the 5th. instant came to my hands yesterday afternoon, and the mail will depart in two hours. On the rect. of it, I went to the house of Mr ——s brother in law, where he lodges when here, but find he has not returned, and is supposed by his friends in this place to be yet in Washington. I suppose he may have gone from thence to Norfolk, Baltimore or Philada. where he has...
I am informed by my friend & neighbour Mr. Du Ponceau, that he has received a letter from our Consul Mr. Lee, at Bordeaux, from which he understands, that Mr. Lee is about to leave his residence & station there. The causes and circumstances are apparently political connected with the opinions, feelings and prejudices, which have grown out of the period between the arrival of the late Emperor...
I have the honor to respectfully to represent to you, that the Governor of Pennsylvania has been pleased to commit to me, the Clerkship of one of the state courts. This Appointment renders it impracticable for me to finish the business of the old revenue service of the United States. The Mass of what remains relates to the secondary & subordinate officers, who have in most instances disputed...
21 April 1804, Purveyor’s Office. “I have taken pains to procure information whether I could obtain a number of sets of the laws upon more favorable terms than those of Mr. Carey. The retail price has been $2 ⅌ vol, or $12 ⅌ set. I think it was high. Books of equal cost to the printer are retailed at $2 for the thickest volumes and $1.50 for the thinest, or $10.50 for the set of 6 volumes. The...
I have been here about a Fortnight during which time we have not made a Congress. So. Carolina, Virga, Pennsa, N. Jersey, & Massachussets are represented. There is one Member from each of the States of Rhode Island, N. Carolina & Georgia, but none from New Hampshire, Connecticut N. York, Delaware or Maryland. I very much wish we may make a house in a week or ten days, as I think the...
I add to the paper No. 1 the two inclosed papers. You will excuse their rough form and the crudity of some parts. I will indeavour to add further remarks on the other Articles. This afternoon a federal merchant called on me and mentioned that a respectable French Merchant, who he named, had informed him that he had seen a letter from France to a friend here, stating as follows, that an action...
I find it to be a fact, that a family connexion of a person, who accuses ABurr, expresses his conviction that the accuser is the worst man of the two. I find it is considered here that the accuser has fears about the contents of a port-folio possessed by Mrs. . I find it asserted that a paper has been sent from the south, since the receipt of the letter in cypher, wch. paper is in the hand...
Since you left Philadelphia I have kept my attention awake to the conduct of the most able—as well as the most active members of the late opposition. I find those who were excessively violent, active & unreserved in their opposition are perfectly silent. Their conduct carries more of ceasing to oppose, than of acquiescence. But some of the most sensible, cautious and artful characters express...