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Some matters of a good deal of consequence to myself render it necessary for me to be known to Mr. Jefferson—just so far as to take the liberty of addressing two or three letters to him. You will oblige me very much by favoring me with two copies of a short letter of introduction to go by different opportunities. It will be much more agreeable to me to receive them from you sealed than open....
My anxiety in favor of the new federal Constitution has induced me to attempt some comments on it, that might render it more clear and agreeable to the people at large, than the concise manner, in which it was necessarily drawn up, would admit of. A friend, with whom I ventured to converse on the Subject, has pressed me to pass them thro the papers of Virginia and New York. This will apologize...
I troubled you with a few lines by Mr Moore, in which I promised myself the pleasure of sending you the third Number of the American Citizen, which I have now the pleasure to enclose. Our house is at this Moment on the Adoption of the plan. A Motion to postpone was made by our Western Members, but on the Question only 12 were for the postponement. The house are now proceeding, and the...
I recd. your letter acknowleging the rect. of the three papers in the Gazetteer. At the request of Mr. Wilson, Dr. Rush and another friend or two I added a 4th. paper, calculated to shew the general advantages & obviate some of the Objections to the System. It was desired by these Gentlemen for the purpose of inserting in one of several handbills, which it was proposed to circulate thro our...
I trouble you once more with an Attempt of mine to explain a point connected wth. the new federal constitution. Finding from a conversation with Mr. Wilson & Dr. Rush that an Idea in Mr. R. H Lee’s letter to your Governor concerning the commercial powers of Congress was doing mischief in Virginia I devoted last Sunday to an investigation of it. I take the liberty of enclosing a couple of...
I have obtained from the Editor about sixty pages of the debates of our State Convention, wch. I am anxious to get into the hands of Mr. King, for the use of the gentlemen in the Massachussets convention. Uncertain whether he is in New York or Boston I have taken the liberty of enclosing it to you with a request that you will as early as possible have it sent forward to him under a franked...
I am truely sorry that appearances are not more promising in Massachussets than I learn from your letter of 20th instant. The pamphlet may be of signal service as things unhappily are so circumstanced & I rejoice in having sent it. I hope the movements of the tradesmen will have an influence on a principal Character. The peculiar situation of Maine is unfortunate. The greatest difficulty will...
From your letter with respect to the Convention at B. I have been anxious to procure the Remr. of Mr. Lloyd’s debates to send to Mr. King. There were some pages more struck off, which I have obtained and cover them to you with a letter to be forwarded as before. I beg your pardon for the trouble I give & the freedom I have used. I find our Opposition were possessed of the temper of the Western...
I trouble you with the last No. (3) of the freeman. In the paper N. 1. signed a Pennsylvanian I have opened a regular examination of the state of the opposition here, & shall endeavour to add a refutation of some of the objections of the minority. Consolidation I shall of course retouch, & therefore wish any thing you meet on that Subject to be enclosed. No. 44, & 45 of Publius are very...
If you thought it worth attention to publish N. 1. of the Pennsylvanian perhaps No. 2, enclosed may also be properly inserted in the same paper. The first was in Hall & Sellers’s of 6th. sent before. I wish to believe the accot. of the 11th from New York informing of the Adoption by Massachussets on 5th instant—but we wait for the Numbers, the form, the more perfect Certainty. To Morrow I...
The fate of the new constitution is now hastening to a crisis. The decision of Virginia in its favor ensures its existence, for South Carolina will most certainly adopt it before you can be organized. If on the other hand your Convention should reject the Government it will be rendered extremely uncertain in New York, New Hampshire, and North Carolina. Had our friends been less sanguine in New...
We have been made very happy by the accots from Richmond by yesterday’s post which were to the 5th. of June. From them we learn that Governor R. has acquiesced in the evident sense of the Majority of the States and of the people & that all Questions were to be defer’d till the whole should be considered in parts—and a letter from the head of the Convention expresses the fullest belief, that...
Since you left Philadelphia I have kept my attention awake to the conduct of the most able—as well as the most active members of the late opposition. I find those who were excessively violent, active & unreserved in their opposition are perfectly silent. Their conduct carries more of ceasing to oppose, than of acquiescence. But some of the most sensible, cautious and artful characters express...
You were good enough to subscribe for a set of the letters of Publius at my request. I have recd. the Books, but as there was to be a remainder of subscription paid I shall be obliged to you, if in some future letter, you will note the amount. It has been affirmed to me with some confidence that a part of those papers were written by you. It would give me great pleasure before I read the work...
I am favored with your last by post & am much obliged to you for the News papers, and your remarks concerning the Views of the opposition in several places. I would not by any means wish a request of the circle of gentlemen, who wrote the papers under the Signature of Publius, which I think with you would be disagreeable and improper. I am to ask your pardon for the trouble I have given you on...
As I know your anxiety upon the Subject of the State legislatures, I have great Satisfaction in assuring you that by the returns of our new house at least 38 are firmly attached to the Constitution. The whole number is 69, but we have no returns of the greater part of the remainder. I think we have the best ground to believe the house will be 40 to 29 at least—and a very able man, Mr. Findlay,...
I have been here about a Fortnight during which time we have not made a Congress. So. Carolina, Virga, Pennsa, N. Jersey, & Massachussets are represented. There is one Member from each of the States of Rhode Island, N. Carolina & Georgia, but none from New Hampshire, Connecticut N. York, Delaware or Maryland. I very much wish we may make a house in a week or ten days, as I think the...
A very long acquaintance with Col. Saml. Hanson, who will have the honor to deliver you this letter, and the respectability and number of testimonials of his merits, which he carries with him to New York have induced me to trespass on your friendship. He goes as a candidate for some public employment for which his talents may be thought equal, and I wish to give him a chance of your support....
I have this afternoon obtained from a friend of Col. Geo. Morgan a copy of his handbill which was put into the hands of confidential people in N. Jersey & Pennsylvania for the purpose of procuring followers. I know your solicitude about the western Country, and have therefore enclosed you a copy, which after you have done with it be pleased to give to Mr. Jay when you have an opty. I am this...
I wrote you a few lines some days ago, which I hope you have received. The letter contained Col. Morgan’s propositions to our farmers & tradesmen. On sunday last I sat down to make a few notes on some points which appear necessary to be considered in forming our System of impost. Enclosed you will find a copy of them hastily transcribed, of which you will make any use you see proper. Some of...
I am very much at a loss how to address you on the subject, which has induced me to trouble you with this letter. It would have the complexion to most men of mere private gratification and advantage. I could not therefore touch the matter to you had I not pursued in my former correspondence only Objects connected with political truth and the public interests. Omitting therefore any further...
Having for some time felt a great deal of anxiety about the consequences to the United States, which appear likely to rise out of the Affairs of the Western Country I have turned my attention a good deal to considering that Subject, and as I know you also have had a very great solicitude about it I shall trouble you with such thoughts or facts relating to it as I think may possibly be of use....
I observe you have brought forward the amendments you proposed to the federal Constitution. I have given them a very careful perusal, and have attended particularly to their reception by the public. The most decided friends of the constitution admit (generally) that they will meliorate the government by removing some points of litigation and jealousy, and by heightening and strengthening the...
From the manner in which you have been pleased to communicate with me both verbally & otherwise I have been led to write to you without reserve and with less ceremony perhaps than could be justified but that I generally had in view the public good. I trusted you would believe that such was my end, and therefore hesitated not to trouble you. On no occasion perhaps has such an apology been more...
I recd. your message from Mr. Dawson, and am at a loss to account for my letter not reaching you sooner. I presume our Clerks must have let the post slip them the first time, and that it has lain over till the next. I am informed Mr. Jefferson is expected to arrive soon. The affair in which you were good enough to make me known to him is now decided on. I find it necessary to regain the papers...
I am favored with your letter of the 18th. from wch. I find the ground of apprehension, particularly refer’d to by me, entirely removed. In regard to the probable effects of a position on Delaware or Susquehannah upon the Convention of Virginia could they have foreseen it, I am convinced they would have been fatal. I remember well that I learned from the letters of yourself and one or two...
I received information of the nomination of Mr. O. yesterday. He is certainly a very suitable character, and well entitled to this place from his former employments. I have to make you my Apologies for the trouble I have given you, and my acknowlegements for such good offices as you have rendered, the extent of which I am sure was as great as your Ideas of public good would admit. I am well...
I am sorry to find that the Rhode Island Convention have adjourned without determining in favor of the Constitution. This conduct is however so far favorable as it may be deemed a proof that they are not violently bent against it. The general causes of the conduct of that State are perfectly well understood, but I wish much to know as far as you have collected them and are at liberty to...
I recd. your favor of the 28th. instant by yesterdays post. I find the idea of a landed fund for the encouragement of manufactures is an old one in my mind. On looking over the little address to the frds of Manufactures in 1787 I observe I have hinted it there. You will excuse me therefore, if I wish not to part with it sooner than can be avoided. An infringement of the constitution is a...
I have the pleasure to enclose you a further consideration of the affairs of R. Island —and two of the papers of which I sent the origls. to Col. H. You will see they will be objects of treaty & consequently must require to be reserved. That which relates to our Navigation is comprized in sixty pages & I have not any person to copy it at this time. In haste yr. respectful & obedt. Servt. RC...
As I know you lodge at Mrs. Ellsworths I take the liberty of troubling you wth. a request that you will oblige me so far as to engage a chamber for me in her house. And if possible one exposed to the South tho it should be in the upper story. I expect to leave Philadelphia for my fathers seat to Morrow, and shall return my sulkey from thence and proceed in the Stage so as to reach New York on...
Mr. Coxe has the honor to request a few Minutes conversation with Mr. Madison this Evening at 7 or ½ after 7 OClock on the subject of the Enquiries he made at the Treasury. If agreeable he will call on Mr. M. at his lodgings for that purpose, unless he shall be informed by a Note directed to him at the Treasury, before three OClock that it will not be convenient then. In that Case he wishes...
I have the Honor to enclose you a paper No. 3 on which the estimate was founded relative to the proportions of foreign & American Articles exported from Pennsylvania. The Estimate has slipt out of the paper & cannot now be found but it resulted in 4,000000 Drs. of Amn. produce & manufactures & 1,500,000 of foreign. This is above common years owing to the great prices of wheat & flour in 1789,...
In pursuance of the intention I had the honor to intimate to you last week I have commenced the collection of the documents necessary to make out the various statements. On Saturday evening I sketched out a plan for the Tonnage which will exhibit all the information, I think, that can be extracted from the returns of the collectors in their present form. It is as follows—A statement of Tonne....
Mr. T. Coxe will be very much obliged to Mr. Madison if he can inform him what is the estimated amount of the debt of the Citizens of Virginia to the British Merchants; and, if he knows it, of those of any other state. He understands the following to be the debt of So. Carolina. Principal due in 1775 £ 2,000,000. Interest from 1775 to 1791 (deducting the 7 years from 1776 to 1783) is 9 years...
One of my neighbours when I lived in this place, Mr. Du Ponceau is about to publish a collection of state papers calculated to illustrate some important points of public law. One of them which he shewed me appeared to be so important that I begd a copy, which I might send to Washington. I have the pleasure to inclose it. You will observe it expressly mentions wheat, meat &ca. not to be...
I have this evening a letter from Mr. Beckley in which he communicates to me the information, that the office of Supervisor of the Revenue of Pennsa. will probably be assigned to General Muhlenberg. There are I believe two offices in this state which will neat more than that—each I mean will. But from long observation and experience you may rely on my information, that to execute both of them...
Knowing the attachment to freedom and humanity, which mark your character I feel a solicitude to bring into your view the Situation of the people of Ireland in the United States. You will not understand that I recommend any measures in regard to them or their unhappy country. But, if any in Authority here have forgotten our engagements of 1775, if they have denied them the proferred rights of...
24 April 1801, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Recommends E. Forman and Samuel White for clerkships. If neither JM nor Gallatin can find employment for them, hopes JM will mention them “for any vacancy in the war or navy departments.” RC ( DLC ). 2 pp.; docketed by JM.
Mr. Jacob Meyer, who was lately our consul in French St. Domingo is going to Washington upon some business, and has requested me to give him a letter to you in whose department the affair lies. I remember Mr. Meyer, when living with Mr. Pettit of Philada. from whom he expects to take a letter to Mr. Gallatin, and I suppose Mr. Pettit, and his sons house of Pettit & Bayard must know more of Mr....
I write you this letter under as much caution as the Circumstances of the case will admit. It relates to the same business as is mentioned in my private letter of the latter end of the Month preceding that month in which this will reach you. The cover of this will shew you by the post mark both its dates of time & place. The person whom I mentioned in the late letter to which I refer has been...
I am so entirely convinced of the continuance of political, local & personal hostility to the present federal administration, or at least to the two most eminent characters in it, that I consider it a duty to my country’s peace to offer some ideas which occasionally arise in my mind, in a confidential manner to those two characters. It is a noble game to oppose to the infidelity, and local &...
Your letter of the 5th. instant came to my hands yesterday afternoon, and the mail will depart in two hours. On the rect. of it, I went to the house of Mr ——s brother in law, where he lodges when here, but find he has not returned, and is supposed by his friends in this place to be yet in Washington. I suppose he may have gone from thence to Norfolk, Baltimore or Philada. where he has...
I have seen the Gentleman, whom you mentioned in your favor of the 6th. to have left Washington before you saw him a second time. I find that he had expected to have been sent for in the Course of the five or six days he spent there, tho he is impressed with the proper ideas as to your hea[l]th, the press of Business, and the difficulty of intercourse in the present scattered state of the...
From a desire to cultivate the public interests and honor of the United States I prepared, soon after Mr Randolph’s resignation, the enclosed paper. It was candidly placed in the hands of Mr R’s successor. It will be perceived that it was studiously qualified so as to meet the prepossessions, some signal expressions of which Mr P. had suffered to escape him. It might be made a much stronger...
Because of Tench Coxe’s efforts on behalf of the Republican party in the Pennsylvania gubernatorial contest of 1799 and in the general federal elections of 1800, Jefferson, in June 1801, had held out to him the prospect of two posts in Philadelphia, one as survey inspector, another as collector of internal revenue. Both positions would have enabled Coxe to remain in Philadelphia, as he...
A small addition is proposed to the note by the mail of monday & wednesday from Pha. to Washn. The subject is of deep importance. It does not proceed from the vanity of suppose [ sic ] that any thing can strike here, which will not occur there. Any dangerous views towards this country are most practicable where there is a particular description of people. We are obviously most vulnerable...
The two enclosed papers N. 1 & 2; written in New York, prove that the recent peace and the concomitant state of things are made from the Moment, subservient to antirepublican purposes by the leading influence among the federalists. They glance, significantly, at Louisiana & Florida. The ideas suggested in regard to the change of the owners of those countries have received from one source a...
I find among my collection of documents in relation to our foreign trade a book full of tables, statements, and representations, which tho written under a very different state of things from that now existing, must be of considerable use in estimating our prospects. I have the pleasure to send it by the mail, of Monday the 4th. Jany. & I retain this letter one day that it may serve as an...
(Private) As I am informed from various quarters that there is no doubt of the repeal of the national revenue laws, my situation obliges me to trouble some of the gentlemen in the government with an application. On reflexion I think it least embarrassing to Mr. Gallatin, in a Pennsylvania case, not to address myself to him, tho he is the only Person, besides the President, to whom I wish, if...