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    • Lovell, James

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Documents filtered by: Period="Washington Presidency" AND Correspondent="Lovell, James"
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I am much obliged by your favor of March 20th and very apprehensive that this is not the only letter of yours unanswered. To leave your letters unanswered is in me very bad œconomy. The General is arrived here; but has as yet said nothing to me of his business. Doctor Craigie shall have all the aid in my power to give him, in his pursuit of justice in your affair: but I do not at present see...
By the last post I was favoured with yours of the twenty first of May. Mr. Duncan I presume has not come on. Neither by his letter or your own am I made acquainted with his Views or the Object of his Wishes—I can only say to him as to all others, that his application must be made to the President and it ought to be in writing. Your testimony in his favr will have weight—I thank you Sir for...
There is no such point in dispute, as that you mention in your favour of the 9th. The only question is concerning the title of the first man. All the world sees the absurdity and feels the humiliation of giving the titled of excellency, which is only a provincial, or diplomatic title of the lowest order, to a great Prince vested with the whole executive authority of Government in a nation, who...
I have not yet answered your letter of the 26 of July. You guess well—I find that I shall have all the unpopular questions to determine: and shall soon be pronounced Hostes republicani generis—What they will do with me I know not, but must trust to Providence. You insinuate that I am accused "of deciding in favor of the power of the prime because I look up to that goal" That I look up to that...
Various circumstances have prevented an earlier answer to your letter of the 22d of August last. The question referred to having been stated to the Attorney General, you will receive a copy of his opinion herewith enclosed, in which I concur. I am Sir   Your obedient Servant L[S] , RG 36, Collector of Customs at Boston, Letters from the Treasury, 1789–1807, Vol. 4, National Archives. Although...
Treasury Department, February 20, 1794. “I am to acknowlege the receipt of your letter of the 31st ultimo, respecting the Petition of the Inspectors and to assure you that early and proper attention will be paid to the subject.” L[S] , RG 36, Collector of Customs at Boston, Letters from the Treasury, 1789–1807, Vol. 4, National Archives; copy, RG 56, Letters to the Collector at Boston,...
[ Boston, January 31, 1794. On February 20, 1794, Hamilton wrote to Lincoln, Lovell, and Melville : “I am to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 31st ultimo.” Letter not found. ] Lincoln was the collector, Lovell the naval officer, and Melville the surveyor of the port of Boston.
Though I know of your extreme Delicacy as to any Interference in the executive Affairs of the USs. yet to you I must apply; for, Heaven & Secretary Jackson know I may be chagrined in an Attempt to address the President. I am in Dread least an Action should take place which will renew Vigor of the Opponents & damp the Spirits of the Friends of Government: And, it will be out of Time to await...
Though your Excellency be not a Pope nor I a Murderer, yet I write under the full Influence of an Idea expressed by Cicero, when soliciting for his Friend Fabius the Patronage of Marcus Cælius a Curule Odile; “novi ego vos magnos patronos: hominem occidat oportet qui vestra opera uti velit” —When I first addressed myself to your Excellency, thirteen years ago, my Life & Liberty were at Stake,...
From the Borders of the Grave, revived, and even established in Health, I once more present my Respects, with my accustomed Fervency to You and Yours. But, with my Respects I must also send my Complaints and Supplications. In a Transaction where you was only, according to your own chosen Expressions, Teste di Legno, I was fretted disgraced and beslaved; and have taken some Measures for...
I had often considered your Situation, before the receipt of your Letter of the 16th; and I had hoped you would "Possess yourself in Patience ." If you already draw a picture, Teste di legno and talk of sharpening an ax for Decapitation, what am I to look for in the Run of a twelvemonth? I do not like your diminuitive italien Idea. You who are said to be more than half British ought to have...
Agreably to the directions of your circular letter of August 31st. covering an order of the Senate passed on the 7th. of may last, I now transmit the demanded account. I cannot, however, refrain from expressing an Hope that my statements may not prove injurious to such Officers as have had usual & necessary Assistance of Clerks, without being driven to devote their own Nights as well as days...
Mr Duncan the Bearer will be easily recollected by you as the Gentleman at whose House we boarded in Philada. upon our Return from Baltimore. He has experienced various Fortune since that Time, and far from favorable in the last year. He is advised and influenced by some of his Friends to seek some Sort of Employment under Congress. Although I could not join in such Advice, yet I cannot...
It is a very happy Circumstance, sick & megrim’d as I am, that I have so excellent an Opportunity as the present, by Mr Jarvis our Comptroller General, of evading with great Advantage to the Public, a written Answer to your important Questions “how are Trade, Shipbuilding &c. &c. affected by the new Government?” No Man perhaps has had more regular mercantile Education and few Men have...
altho’ this letter is somewhat of a public nature, yet I dare not address you in a consonant manner, ‘till the Point is settled between his Excellency and John Adams. I apply to you, as I feel you in my Heart to be; satisfied that the Yeas & Nays of no public Body whatsoever concerning Epithets can in any way measure alter Essences . Dear Sir, Sturgis Gorham of Barnstable is my Brother in Law,...
You will have a Visit from your old Friend Genl. Warren who supposed I could certify some Intentions of the former Congress greatly to his Advantage. Your Namesake has done it; but I found it impossible for me upon a strict Review of the Case. As you were absent part of the Time I think it my Duty to save you the Toil of searching those Journals wherein this Business is scattered. The Sketch...
[ Boston, August 22, 1793. On November 29, 1793, Hamilton wrote to Lovell : “Various circumstances have prevented an earlier answer to your letter of the 22d of August last.” Letter not found. ] Lovell was the naval officer for the port of Boston.