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    • Lovell, James

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Documents filtered by: Period="Confederation Period" AND Correspondent="Lovell, James"
Results 1-8 of 8 sorted by date (descending)
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I this evening received your letter of April 12 th. tho’ you love a labyrinth you always give a clue. M r & M rs L may be assured that an old friend so well qualified for the office he holds will not be forgotten, and that it would be of little consequence whether P: is at Braintree or N York. M r L is surely sufficiently acquainted with my friend to know that he may be sure of his interest. I...
M r. Du err , as you pronounce it, and my Wife seem to think alike as to the Powers of an Ambassadress when placed as an Helpmate to the Ambassador. M r D. had an Idea of an handsome Face M rs. L thought only of the Good Sense of the Lady. If this is ambiguous , y r. best Friend can make it plain so far as relates to Du err . As to M rs. L I will show her to you in a Minute, just as She...
Advised and even pressed, by Friends near me and at a Distance, “ to go on to New York ;—to be in the Way of soliciting, counteracting ” and such kind of Measures respecting the Collectorship here, I am sure I need only say to you that my Duty lays in this country; and that the very Circumstance of quitting & neglecting it for the purposes mentioned would be very ill Proof of that Degree of...
Am I to be mortified by finding that I have not been missed among those who have paid their Compliments to You & your Lady since your arrival here? Or, will you Both rather do me the Justice to own a degree of surprise at not being one of the very first ? Unavoidable engagement in my office frustrated my eager wish to be at your Landing, Stairs, and, situated as you are, at present, you must...
I am ashamed to confess that your Letter of the 5. of July is unanswered. But my dear Sir, I have been So roughly handled by various Climates, Voyages Journeys, Scurveys and Fevers, and So tossed about from Post to Pillar, by the Business assigned me from time to time, and amidst all this, So overloaded with Business, that I have for Sometime past, been constrained to prefer Indolence and Ease...
Suppose every proper Epithet to occupy these two upper Lines. Under them all I most cordially salute you. Once upon the Arrival of a Ship from France “you was too happy to find Time for answering Letters.” I do not now want any Answer. All I wish is that you may steal from yourself and one other a Minute for reading this short Scrawl. Your Benevolence and your Curiosity secure my Wish; and,...
I did not omit to write by the Conveyance of one of the most amiable Women I ever knew. I only omitted to send my written Congratulations to you upon that Felicity which her Presence must afford after so long a Seperation. Capital Sacrifice to your Country thus pleasingly in part rewarded! The Consul Gen l. of France, my Neighbour, then informed me that M rs. Adams had sailed while I slept,...
It is long, since I took any Opportunity of repeating Assurances of my sincere and very great Esteem for you. Tired most heartily of the Jealousies & Animosities which are almost inseperable from governmental Emploies, and very hardly put to it to find Bread to eat or Rayment to cloathe myself and my numerous Family, I have rarely felt any proper Disposition of Mind for an Attempt to write...