Search help
Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Lovell, James" AND Correspondent="Adams, John"
Results 1-30 of 110 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Mr. Gorham and Mr. Russel, Agents of the Town of Charlestown, have presented to Congress a Petition from the unfortunate Inhabitants of that Place, praying for a Compensation for their Losses. The Petition was drawn in very decent and handsome Terms, containing a lively Description of the Distresses to which the unhappy Petitioners are reduced, from a State of Ease and Affluence; and the...
Tho I must refer you as well as Mr. Hancock to what I have written to Mr. S. Adams relative to the Business in Congress, and also omit at present general chit chat of Men Women and Things, yet one little Peice of History which is peculiarly adapted to your improving Fancy I must put down. Mr. Hancock’s Waggoner who went with Mrs. Hancock to Boston, after his Return to Germantown his Home...
It appears by Returns this day received from Genl. Gates that Burgoine must have destroyed his Standards and almost every other military Trophy during the Capitulation. Not one Musket fit for use was delivered, not one Scabbard to a Bayonett or Cutlass. We are told that instead of piling the Arms the Enemy chose to ground them, that the Waggons might more certainly crush them. Gates does not...
We have this Evening a Letter from Mr. Bingham of Octr. 13th. in which he tells us that the french General had received a Packet by a Boat which left Rochelle Sepr. 4th. advising him of the destination of 5,000 Troops for Martinique the Transports being actually ready at Havre Nantes and Bourdeaux to take them on Board. An Embargo was to be immediately laid upon european bound Vessels to...
I shall not in my great hurry repeat to you any of the matters which I have written to Mr. S. Adams as you can have them, on sight of him. I expected Brother Geary would have written to you but he has just requested me to inclose two Letters which he opened in consequence of your orders; and to give his Compliments to you begging your excuse of his further silence as he is preparing to go on a...
As I was at the Secretaries yesterday I took off a few Resolutions from the Journals for your view, supposing as to the above, that you might have forgotten them, and as to the following, wishing to have your Sentiments. I doubt not you will think it may or may not be proper to take from the minds of foreign Courts the Idea that we are absolutely determind about our conduct towards Great...
With great pleasure to ourselves we discharge our duty by inclosing to you your Commission for representing these United States at the Court of France. We are by no means willing to indulge a thought of your declining this important service, and therefore we send duplicates of the Commission and the late Resolves, in order that you may take one sett with you, and send the other, by another...
Your kind Favours of 14 and 18 Novr. I received together, this Evening. I thank you, for your obliging Remembrance of me, and for your entertaining Anecdotes. Is there not Ground of Suspicion, that the Standards, Trophys, and other things, are concealed among, the Officers Baggage? But by the Convention Burgoignes Honour is to be relyed on, that nothing improper Shall be So concealed. A broken...
Since my signing a letter to you with Colo. Lee an excellent opportunity of sending to France presented; and the Colonel in his way home has carried a Packet to Baltimore, which will go to the Commissioners in a swift sailing armed Vessel. No: 1 contained Triplicates of Letters dated Octr. 31st. Novr. 1st. and Novr 8th No. 2 A Letter of Decr. 1st. and Resolves respecting Frenchmen Sept. 8. 13....
Decr. 2d. Resolved that a Commission be made out for Mr. J. Adams similar to that heretofore granted to the Commissioners at the Court of France. The date of the Commissions upon the 27th. was an error of the Secretary. But He as well as the president and others think it of no consequence. In Congress Decr. 17th. 1777 Resolved that Genl. Washington be directed to inform Genl. Burgoyne the...
That you may excuse my vile manner of doing business, know that I am freezing in my little room this morning so that I can scarcely hold my pen, but, I am, here, in quiet. The sealed packet sent before contained Triplicates of Octr. 31st Novr. 1 and 8 which last were only an Introduction of the Bearer Col: Ewen, and an Annunciation of Mr. Laurens’s Election as President so that his Draughts...
After the Resolve for stopping Burgoyne had passed, some were of opinion that a State of Facts found by the Committee should have preceeded the reasoning. Perhaps you will judge that it is already too laboured a report. I inclose for your own use the State of Facts alluded to which did not enter into the business of Congress; but was only talked of. We have intelligence now that 2 Hoits...
I cannot omit this opportunity of acknowledging the Receipt of your kind Favours of 27 or 28 Novr. I Say one or the other of those days, because although the Letter has no date yet it Says it was written on the Day when a certain Commission was voted me, and both the Commissions are dated the 27, altho the Copy of the Resolution of Congress by which I was appointed is dated the 28. I should...
Mr. Geary otherways engaged has given me the pleasure of forwarding this Intelligence from your friend Jefferson respecting the ready concurrence of the Dominion with the Articles sent lately to the States in a hope of cementing them together in a firm League. I am particularly rejoyced at this dispatch at this critical time when things appear almost desperate in this neighbourhood. As a...
The year is rendered quite pleasing to me, in its beginning, by the arrival of your favour of the 6th of december, which assures me you were then in health with your lovely family. May part of that happiness long continue! I say part, for I wish you may e’er long be in France, or, at York Town. Your aid has been greatly wanted upon a most important transaction. We have had a call for your...
First and foremost, become a reconciling advocate for me with your dear lovely Portia, who, from the most rational tender attachment to you, is as angry with me as her judiciously patriotic Spirit will allow, upon a foundation which I hope you have been acquainted with, long e’er this day. This hint must pass for an acknowledgement of the receipt of her letter of Decr. 19th. and for all the...
The receipt of your letters of Decr. 24th variously directed gave equal and uniform satisfaction here yesterday. There was an error in the date of the Commission but it is judged to be of no importance. I send all the dispatches to you open as before that you may be acquainted with the contents, in case you should forward them before you sail yourself. I will endeavour to send your Chest by...
York, February 1778. RC ( Adams Papers ). Believing that JA could receive yet another letter in addition to those of 8 and 10 Feb. (above), Lovell wrote to wish him a happy voyage and to give him “an idea of our intended Progress into Canada” by quoting resolutions passed by the congress on 22, 23, 24, and 28 Jan. and 2 Feb. To provide JA with an understanding of the kind of representation...
I have received, this Morning, by several Hands and at other Times during the last Week, Several of your Favours. I will endeavour to acknowledge each if I can but if I should mistake in my Hurry and omit, one or two I hope you will excuse it. One of Jany 1. one of Jany. 17. one of Jany 21. one of Jany. 20. with their Enclosures. I will, do all I can to ensure a Passage for the Resolution of...
Yours of Janry. 9th is before me. Deane had inclosed to Congress a long minute corresponding history of what you sent me. He doubted whether Mr. R M had communicated to us what had been sent of the kind formerly therefore he wrote to him lately with flying seals under cover to the President. Mr. R M had been indiscreet in remarking to T.M. upon the Conduct of the Commissioners as not acting...
The week after Mr. C—— was appointed secretary, I saw the P.S. of a letter to Mr. S.A. in which he is said to be a very unworthy person, but he has so good a Character in the estimation of Congress and from Maryland Gentlemen, that I did not think proper to move for a power of Suspension to be given to the Commissioners, as I find it is the opinion of some here that the secretary should be...
This, with my affectionate wishes for your prosperity, may serve to acquaint you that Congress has this day resolved “That William Bingham Esqr. agent of the United States of America, now resident in Martinico, be authorized to draw bills of exchange at double usance on the Commissioners of the United States at Paris for any sums not exceeding in the whole one hundred thousand livres tournois,...
I promise myself much from the eight or nine scrawls which I have sent to you since your departure from America, in the spirit, I own to you, with which Indians make their presents of feathers or bark. I must depend upon your imagination to comprehend what I will not undertake to describe—our chagrin and perplexity at our total ignorance of the situation and transactions of the Commissioners...
In aid to your scrutiny after the real robber of the Commissioners Dispatches, I send what I think a good Confirmation of Folgiers honesty. By comparing the Governor’s letter with Folgier’s Examination you will find the Governor led into a mistake about the number of Seals broken, by Folgiers forgetting that the outside Cover of the whole had anything more than “Dispatches” wrote on it. He...
Our Affairs have now a universally good appearance. Every thing at home and abroad seems verging towards a happy and permanent period. We are preparing for either War or Peace; for altho we are fully perswaded that our Enemies are wearied beaten and disappoint in despair, yet we shall not presume too much on that belief, and the rather, as it is our fixt determination to admit no terms of...
I find it impossible to write to you at this Time so fully as I wish being greatly overplied with business from the neglect of others. I cannot however consent that Dispatches for France should go off without a line in Testimony of my personal attachment to you and in proof of remembrance of my promises; which kind of proof I have given 9 Times before since you left Boston. Ever, more uneasy...
As I hinted to you in my letter of yesterday, which goes by a different Vessel from what bears this, Half-pay for 7 years, if they live so long, is granted to the Officers who serve the War out. It was also resolved to give 80 Dollars to the Men in addition to their Land. The Commissioners at the Courts of Tuscany Vienna and Berlin are to have plenipotentiary Commissions and not to be...
I fear I omitted to send the Resolve of May 5th. with 3 past Packets. I shall be vexed if it does not reach you with the Ratifications as, on the Timing of it depends much of its Propriety. I was strangely betrayed by its having been dated the 4th. in a mistaken Alteration, when A.B.C. were sent Eastward. By Letters Yesterday from Mr. Beaumarchais I find Mr. Deane is probably on this Continent...
The British Commissioners have arrived and transmitted their powers and propositions to Congress, which have received the answer you will see in the Pennsylvania Gazette of the 20th. instant. On the 18th. of this month Gen. Clinton with the British army (now under his command) abandoned Philadelphia, and the City is in possession of our Troops. The enemy crossed into Jersey, but whether with...
Passy, 9 July 1778. printed: JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:148–149 . Adams announced the arrival of dispatches from the congress, including the ratified Franco-American treaties and letters from Lovell. He commented on the outbreak of hostilities between Britain and France and the relative...