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Documents filtered by: Period="Revolutionary War" AND Correspondent="Lee, Arthur"
Results 11-20 of 1,479 sorted by author
Your Favours of June 2d and 5th are now before me: that of 29 March, I have answered if I ever received it, for I have answered every one received from you, but not having my Papers at Hand cannot be particular. Thank you for the Manuscript and the Pamphlet. Am happy to hear from you and from all others, so agreable a Character of the Chevalier de la Luzerne, and M. de Marbois the last of whom...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; three copies: National Archives We had the Honour of receiving your Excellencys Letter of the 7 Instant to which We shall take the Liberty of answering fully by another opportunity. As you mention that the Prize was condemned on the 20th Mr. Izard is apprehensive that the goods in Question may be sold, before the ordinary Course of Law can prevent...
I have sometimes complained, that having no Place appointed for the public Papers, nor any Person to keep them in order, was an Inconvenience and Interruption to the public Business; I have added , that to have the Papers in my Chamber, as they are in disorder, and many Persons going to them at Pleasure, taking out Some, and removing others, was un equal upon me, as making me in a Sort...
The Alliance between this Kingdom, and the United States of America, is an Event of such Magnitude in their History, that We conceive it would be highly pleasing to our Constituents, to have the Picture of their his Majesty their illustrious Friend and Ally, to be kept in some Public Place where the Congress sits. We would carefully avoid every Thing which would be disagreable to the King and...
Inclosed is a Letter from London: I have recieved another from Mr. Jennings, who says he inclosed a Letter for you lately, but does not mention the Date, in one to the House of Mr. Grand, and desires me to enquire there, for some things of his, particularly some Maps which You left there. I have enquired of Mr. Grand and his Son Henry, but they know nothing of it. There is Room to hope that...
Congress forced Us, into a situation, which obliged Us to venture upon a Piece of Indiscipline, in order to Secure a tollerable Peace, So that you may well Suppose We are anxious to know how it is received among you, and what is to be our Fate. Whether We are to be approved, excused, justified or censured. The most curious and inexplicable Part of the History is Franklins joining in the...
I have recieved your’s of the 26th, and that of the 15th. of this Month. I inclose a Copy of the Letter You desire. Mr. Garnier is gone into the Country, and I have not seen him since I arrived here. Mr. Iz. however has seen him and will give You a satisfactory Account of what he says. If I were to apply to the other Gentleman, You know what would be the Consequence. It would fly very soon to...
Yours from Lebanon 28 Sept. is just come to hand. I wish the Mass. happy in their Governor. It would not have been otherwise, as you Suggest, had an Absent Citizen been at home. Popularity is a Witch. The Gentleman chosen has long been So, to a great degree. The Absent one could Scarcely ever be Said to be so. So it has ever been. Objects must be set up for popular Admiration, Confidence, and...
LS : Harvard University Library; AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; two copies: National Archives <Passy, July 22, 1778: If the French sailors enlisted in your books are to go to Boston, they should return to the ship and receive their due in wages and prize money. Otherwise, the cruise being complete, they are entitled to collect what is owed them, deducting advances, and to...
I had the honor of yours of August 7th. yesterday. The letters inclosed are sent to their Destinations. I have long since taken such measures, as depended upon me, and continue to do all that Decency will permit, to induce the States to send a Minister to Congress. I am convinced it will not be done before next Spring. To give You a compleat detail of the Reasons of this would cost a tedious...