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    • Franklin, Benjamin
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    • Lee, Arthur
    • Franklin, Benjamin

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Documents filtered by: Author="Franklin, Benjamin" AND Correspondent="Lee, Arthur" AND Correspondent="Franklin, Benjamin"
Results 11-20 of 475 sorted by author
LS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères; AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; two copies: National Archives <Passy, May 16, 1778: We received this morning your letter of the 13th about the Boston , and assure you that she is an American warship maintained at the expense of Congress. The King’s reply to the farmers general will, we assume, accord with international usage.>...
Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, Library of Congress, National Archives (two) <Passy, January 13, 1779: We received yesterday your letter of the seventh and one from the comte de Vergennes, a copy of which is enclosed. We wrote his Excellency today requesting the convoy be sent to Nantes. We regret the convoy will not be able to go all the way to America, and hope it will continue...
AL : Clements Library, University of Michigan; AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; copy: National Archives <Passy, May 22, 1778: Mr. Joseph Parker of London has asked us to write to you about his property in a vessel that has been in public hands since the spring of 1775. We have reason to think that he is a worthy man, a friend of America; further detention of his property will ruin...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; copies: National Archives (two); incomplete copy: Archives nationales <Passy, October 30, 1778: We are honored by your letter of October 26 and grateful for the prompt release of some of our countrymen imprisoned at Dinan. We have received another petition from prisoners at Brest; it appears that there are ten of them, only four of whom we had...
Last Night, We had a Letter from Nantes a Copy of which we have the honour to inclose to your Excellency. The Subject of it appears to us, of great Importance to the United States, as well as to the Individuals, Frenchmen and Americans, who are interested in the Vessels destined to America, to a considerable Number of Gentlemen and others who are going Passengers in this Fleet, and ultimately...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; two copies: National Archives Your favours of the 15 Octr. and 1st of November We have recd with their Inclosures. And We approve of your Conduct and the Reasons of it, excepting Mr De la Plaine.— As he is not in the service of the united States We cannot justify, putting the united States to Expence for his assistance. You will please to draw upon...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; two copies: National Archives <Passy, June 23, 1778: Mr. Joy Castle of Philadelphia informs us that his bark Jane , William Castle master, and her cargo have been seized at Bordeaux on the King’s order as British property. He is an American citizen, abroad because of sickness in the family, and now wants to return home, where he has an estate. His...
LS : National Archives; AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; copies: Library of Congress, National Archives We have written to Mr John Daniel Schweighauser of Nantes, to receive your Cargo and dispose of it; but he writes us that he is apprehensive you will require a Letter from us to you. This is therefore to authorize and direct you to deliver, the Cargo of the Morris to Mr....
LS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères; copies: Library of Congress, National Archives <Passy, January 24, 1779: We received your letter of the 20th enclosing M. de Sartine’s answer relative to the convoy we requested. We do not understand his reference to the four vessels supposedly mentioned by us and fear he has been misinformed. On December 29 we asked for a convoy. You asked...
We herewith communicate to your Excellency a Resolution of Congress relative to the Treaties, which we request may be laid before the King. Thereby his Majesty will perceive the unfeigned Sentiments of that Body, as well as those of the whole American People, whose Hearts the King has gained by his great Benevolence towards them, manifested in these Treaties, which has made so deep an...