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I received three days ago Mr. Randolph’s letter of the 14th. from Richmond, and received it with great joy as it informed me of the reestablishment of dear Anne’s health. I apprehend from an expression in his letter that some of mine may have miscarried. I have never failed to write every Thursday or Friday. Percieving by the Richmond paper that the Western post now leaves that place on...
Mr. Short in a late letter says that your acquaintances in Panthemont complain excessively of your inattention to them and desired him to mention it. Matters there are going on well. The sales of the church lands are succesful beyond all calculation. There has been a riot in Paris in which M. de Castrie’s houshould furniture was destroyed. I am opening my things from Paris as fast as the...
Yours of May 20 came to hand the 1st. inst. I imagine you recieved mine of May 18. about six days after the date of yours. It was written the first post-day after my arrival here. The commission you inclosed for Maria is executed, and the things are in the care of Mr. Boyce of Richmond, who is returning from hence with some goods of his own, and will deliver them to Mr. Johnston.—I recieve...
I am at length got well of a terrible cold, which I think must have proceeded from the intense cold of the day I left Belmont. It became very bad by the time I got to Baltimore, and has been worse here. However it is now entirely passed off. We are here lounging our time away, doing nothing, and having nothing to do. It gives me great regret to be passing my time so uselessly when it could...
The hour of post is come and a throng of business allows me only to inform you we are well, and to acknolege the receipt of Mr. Randolph’s letter of Jan. 24. With hopes that you are all so accept assurances of constant love to you all from your’s my dear most affectionately RC ( NNP ); at foot of text: “Mrs. Randolph”; endorsed by Mrs. Randolph. PrC ( CSmH ). Tr ( ViU : Edgehill-Randolph...
After the departure of my last letter to Mr. Randolph I found the details I had given him respecting the waggon were erroneous. The rise of the river had cut off our communications for several days. I presume it arrived at Varina as soon as my letter. We are all well here. Jefferson particularly so. He is become the finest boy possible. Always in good humor, always amusing himself, and very...
I have nothing interesting to tell you from hence but that we are well, and how much we love you. From Monticello you have every thing to write about which I have any care. How do my young chesnut trees? How comes on your garden? How fare the fruit blossoms &c. I sent to Mr. Randolph, I think, some seed of the Bent-grass which is much extolled. I now inclose you some seed which Mr. Hawkins...
Maria and I are scoring off the weeks which separate us from you. They wear off slowly, but time is sure tho’ slow. Mr. D. Randolph left us three days ago. He went by the way of Presquisle and consequently will not enrapture Mrs. Randolph till the latter end of the month. I wrote to Mr. Randolph sometime ago to desire he would send off Tom Shackleford or Jupiter or any body else on the 1st. of...
My letter by the last post was to mr Randolph, dated May 24. yours of the 12th. inst. did not get to hand till the 29th. so it must have laid by a post somewhere. the receipt of it, by kindling up all my recollections increases my impatience to leave this place & every thing which can be disgusting, for Monticello and my dear family, comprising every thing which is pleasurable to me in this...
Your last letter come to hand was of May 23. Consequently it is now two months old. Petit arrived here three or four days ago, and accosted me with an assurance that he was come pour rester toujours avec moi. The principal small news he brings is that Panthemont is one of the convents to be kept up for education, that the old Abbess is living, but Madame de Taubenheim dead, that some of the...
My last news from you were conveyed in your letter of May 28. I ascribe this to your present ambulatory life. I hope when you are more in the way of the post, I shall receive letters regularly once a week from one or other of you, as I write regularly once a week myself. In my letter of the last week to Mr. Randolph I mentioned the appearances of a war between England and Spain. We have...
I reached Fredericksburg the day after I left you, and this place on Christmas-day, having (thanks to my pelisse) felt no more sensation of cold on the road than if I had been in a warm bed. nevertheless I got a small cold which brought on an inflammation in the eyes, head ach &c so that I kept within doors yesterday & only took my seat in Senate to-day. I have as yet had little opportunity of...
My head has been so full of farming since I have found it necessary to prepare a plan for my manager, that I could not resist the addressing my last weekly letters to Mr. Randolph and boring him with my plans.—Maria writes to you to-day. She is getting into tolerable health, tho’ not good. She passes two or three days in the week with me, under the trees, for I never go into the house but at...
We have no letter from Monticello since Mr. Randolph’s of Jan. 30. to Maria. However we hope you are all well and that there are letters on the road which will tell us so. Maria writes to-day. Congress will rise on Saturday next, a term which is joyous to all as it affords some relaxation of business to all. We have had the mildest winter ever known, having had only two snows to cover the...
I wrote to mr Randolph on the 9th. & 10th. inst. and yesterday recieved his letter of the 10th. it gave me real joy to learn that Lilly had got a recruit of hands from mr Allen; tho’ still I would not have that prevent the taking all from the nailery who are able to cut, as I desired in mine of the 9th. as I wish Craven’s ground to be got ready for him without any delay. mr Randolph writes me...
I have for some time been sensible I should be detained here longer than I had expected, but could not till now judge how long. Chisolm will finish his work in about 10. days, and it is very essential that I should see the walls covered with their plates, that they may be in a state of preservation. this will keep me 3. or 4. days longer, so that I expect to be here still about a fortnight...
Yours of the 2d came yesterday. I wrote to Mr. Randolph two days ago, but by a bungle of the servant it did not get to the post office in time, so I suppose that and this will get to hand together, and both probably only the evening before I shall reach Monticello. Still should my former one desiring horses, have missed, this will be in time for them to meet me on the road, and relieve mine in...
Maria’s letter of July 16. informs me you were all well then. However great my confidence is in the healthy air of Monticello, I am always happy to have my hopes confirmed by letter. The day of my departure is not yet fixed. I hope it will be earlier or later in the first week of September. I know not as yet how I am to get along, as one of my horses is in such a condition as to leave little...
I wrote to each of you once during my journey, from which I returned four days ago, having enjoyed thro’ the whole of it very perfect health. I am in hopes the relaxation it gave me from business has freed me from the almost constant headach with which I had been persecuted thro the whole winter and spring. Having been entirely clear of it while travelling proves it to have been occasioned by...
I ought oftener, my dear Martha, to recieve your letters, for the very great pleasure they give me, & especially when they express your affections for me. for though I cannot doubt them, yet they are among those truths which tho’ not doubted we love to hear repeated. here too they serve like gleams of light, to chear a dreary scene, where envy, hatred, malice, revenge, & all the worst passions...
Your letter by the post is not yet come to hand, that by Mr. Beresford I received this morning. Your long silence had induced me almost to suspect you had forgotten me and the more so as I had desired you to write to me every week. I am anxious to know what books you read, what tunes you can play, and to receive specimens of your drawing. With respect to your meeting Mr. Simitiere at Mr....
Mr. Randolph’s letter of Dec. 20. from Richmond is the only one come to hand from him or you since your’s from Bizarre of two months ago. Tho’ his letter informed me of the re-establishment of Anne, yet I wish to learn that time confirms our hopes. We were entertained here lately with the ascent of Mr. Blanchard in a baloon . The security of the thing appeared so great that every body is...
The last letter I recieved from you was of the 2d July. In mine of the 14th. inst. to Mr. Randolph I informed him I should set out the next day to Rhode island with the President. I did so, and returned yesterday, after a very pleasant sail of two days going and two days returning thro the Sound. We visited Newport and Providence, where the President was received with great cordiality. He...
I arrived here on Sunday morning (May 30.) to breakfast without having experienced any accident on the road, other than being twice taken in soaking rains: but my water proof coat was a perfect protection. mr and mrs Madison arrived the day after. I find they have not yet got clear of the measles here, so that either at home or here your family will hardly escape it. it is now time for you to...
This is a scolding letter for you all. I have not recieved a scrip of a pen from home since I left it which is now eleven weeks. I think it so easy for you to write me one letter every week, which will be but once in three weeks for each of you, when I write one every week who have not one moment’s repose from business from the first to the last moment of the week. Perhaps you think you have...
I will call for you today, my dear between twelve and one. You must be dressed, because we drink tea with Mrs. Montgomery. Bring your music and drawings. Adieu my dear Patsy. MS not found; text printed from a photostat in NcD ; unsigned, undated, and unaddressed. This note was written with TJ’s left hand, and therefore belongs to some date after 18 Sep., when TJ injured his wrist, and before...
We are all well here, my dear daughter, and Jefferson particularly so. He often repeats that you told a story, ‘that you did,’ when you got into the carriage and said you would come back for him. His cheeks swell with emphasis as he asseverates this. We are just beginning our demolitions, and find they will be very troublesome. It was high time to do it, from the rotten state in which we found...
I recieved yours my dear Martha, of Mar. 31. four days ago. The inoculation at Richmond having stopped that post I send this by the way of Fredsbg. I entirely approve of your resolution to have the children inoculated. I had before been so much convinced of the expediency of the measure that I had taken it for granted before your letter informed me of it. I am called to Philadelphia to a...
Mr. Randolph’s letter of Mar. 26. informs me you are all well at Belmont. my last news from Eppington was of Mar. 20. when all were well there. I have myself had remarkeably good health through the winter, since the cold which I took on my way here. the advance of the season makes me long to get home. the first shad we had here was Mar. 16. and Mar. 28. was the first day we could observe a...
Your two last letters are those which have given me the greatest pleasure of any I ever recieved from you. The one announced that you were become a notable housewife, the other a mother. This last is undoubtedly the key-stone of the arch of matrimonial happiness, as the first is it’s daily aliment. Accept my sincere congratulations for yourself and Mr. Randolph. I hope you are getting well,...
I have this day received yours of the 18th. November and sincerely sympathize with you on the state of dear Anne, if that can be called sympathy which proceeds from affection at first hand, for my affections had fastened on her for her own sake and not merely for yours. Still however experience (and that in your own case) has taught me that an infant is never desperate, let me beseech you not...
I was prevented writing to you last week by a bad cold attended with fever: and this week I have nothing to say but that I find myself nearly well, and to repeat the assurances of my love to you. Maria is well, and has come to a resolution to write to you no more. Whether this arises most from resentment or laziness I do not know. Mr. Randolph’s last letter received was of Dec. 29, yours of...
I recieved Anne’s letter by the last post , in which she forgot to mention the health of the family, but I presume it good. I inclose you a medal executed by an artist lately from Europe and who appears to be equal to any in the world. it is taken from Houdon’s bust, for he never saw me. it sells the more readily as the prints which have been offered the public are such miserable caracatures....
I wrote, my dear Martha, by last week’s post to Mr. Randolph. Yesterday I received his of Oct. 31. The fever in Philadelphia has almost entirely disappeared. The Physicians say they have no new infections since the great rains which have fallen. Some previous ones are still to die or recover, and so close this tragedy. I think however the Executive will remain here till the meeting of...
Your’s of the 19. came to hand yesterday. as it says nothing of your health I presume all are well. I recieved yesterday also a letter from Maria of the 18th. she was then well & preparing to go to Eppington, and in about 4. weeks expected to set out for Albemarle. mr Eppes was engaged in his harvest much obstructed by rain, & regretting he had not before deposited Maria at Monticello. I hope...
Your letters of the 20th. and 27th. Feb. as well as Mr. Randolph’s of the same dates, came to hand only yesterday. By this I percieve that your post must be under bad regulation indeed. I am sorry to learn that your garden is dismantled, and yourself thereby discoraged from attention to it. I beg that Mr. Randolph will employ the whole force, he has been so kind as to direct, in repairing the...
I have got so far, my dear Martha, on my way to Philadelphia which place I shall not reach till the day after tomorrow. I have lost one day at Georgetown by the failure of the stages, and three days by having suffered myself to be persuaded at Baltimore to cross the bay and come by this route as quicker and pleasanter. After being forced back on the bay by bad weather in a first attempt to...
I have received two or three letters from you since I wrote last. Indeed my health has been so bad that I have been able scarcely to read, write or do any thing else. Your letters to your aunt and the others shall be forwarded. I hope you will continue to inclose to me every week one for some of your friends in Virginia. I am sorry Mr. Cimetiere cannot attend you, because it is probable you...
Since I wrote last to you, which was on the 24th. of March, I have received yours of March 22. I am indeed sorry to hear of the situation of Walker Gilmer and shall hope the letters from Monticello will continue to inform me how he does. I know how much his parents will suffer, and how much he merited all their affection.—Mrs. Trist has been so kind as to have your calash made, but either by...
The letter you forwarded , my dear Martha, desiring me to attend the Buckingham court of this month, requires an impossibility because that is tomorrow. I Know also that the trial of the question cannot be at the Same court at which the two wills are presented. Time must be given to Summon witnesses, and I Suppose I shall be Served with a Summons notifying the day I must appear.— We have had a...
We have had no letter from you since your arrival at the Warmsprings, but are told you are gone on to the sweet springs. Not knowing how to write to you by post, I take the opportunity of sending this by Dr. Currie.—He has mentioned to me the home-less situation of Nancy Randolph . She is now with Mrs. Carrington. I do not know whether she is on such a footing with Mr. Randolph and yourself as...
I recieved, my dear daughter, your’s of the 13th . by post. I regret extremely the situation of your family, not only for my disappointment here, but for what they are to suffer. I acknolege that, knowing when I came away the measles were in the neighborhood, I saw it was but too possible your visit here would be delayed. as it is, we must agree to the fall visit, and as Maria will be at...
I now inclose you Petit’s statement of the stores sent round to Richmond to the care of Mr. Brown. They sailed from hence yesterday morning, and the winds have been and are so favorable that I dare say they will be in Chesapeak bay tomorrow, ready for the first Southernly breeze to carry them up the river. So that they will probably be at Richmond some days before you receive this. I wrote to...
We had peaches and Indian corn the 12th. instant. When do they begin with you this year?—Can you lay up a good stock of seed-peas for the ensuing summer? We will try this winter to cover our garden with a heavy coat of manure. When earth is rich it bids defiance to droughts, yeilds in abundance and of the best quality. I suspect that the insects which have harassed you have been encouraged by...
I wrote you last on the 26th. of the last month. On the 3d. of the present I received Mr. Randolph’s favor of May 22. I sincerely congratulate you on the arrival of the Mocking bird. Learn all the children to venerate it as a superior being in the form of a bird, or as a being which will haunt them if any harm is done to itself or it’s eggs. I shall hope that the multiplication of the cedar in...
We are well here, tho’ still without news from Mr. Randolph or yourself, tho’ we have been eight weeks from Monticello. Maria was to have written to you to-day, but she has been so closely engaged in pasting paper together in the form of a pocket book that she has not been able. She has been constantly getting colds since she came here. I have put on board Capt Stratton a box with the...
Your’s of the 25th. of April came to hand ten days ago, and yesterday I received Mr. Randolph’s of the 3d. instant. When I wrote to him last week, I hoped to have been soon rid of the periodical headach which had attacked me. It has indeed been remarkeably slight since that, but I am not yet quite clear of it. I expect every fit to be the last. I inclose the newspapers for Mr. Randolph. He...
I have at length found time to copy Petit’s list of the packages sent to Richmond. Tho’ I have not heard of their arrival there, I take for granted they must be arrived. I inclose you the list wherein I have marked with an * the boxes which must remain at Richmond till they can be carried up by water, as to put them into a waggon would be a certain sacrifice of them. They are the Nos. 2. 5....
I was too much occupied to write by Friday’s post and fear it will occasion your recieving my letter a week later. Yours of the 7th. Inst. has come duly to hand. Colo. and Mrs. Monroe will probably be with you by the time you recieve this. Mr. Madison left us last Wednesday. I have promised, during his stay in Orange, to inclose to him Fenno’s paper for his perusal, to be forwarded on to Mr....
I have not received a letter from you since early in February . This is far short of my injunctions to write once a week by post. I wish this for my own gratification as well as for your improvement. I received yesterday letters from Eppington by which I learn that the families there and at Hors du monde are well, and that your cousin Cary has a son. Lucy has been unwell during the winter but...