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    • Randolph, Martha Jefferson
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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Randolph, Martha Jefferson" AND Period="Washington Presidency" AND Correspondent="Jefferson, Thomas"
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I saw in Philadelphia your friends Mrs. Trist and Miss Rittenhouse. Both complained of your not writing. In Baltimore I enquired after Mrs. Buchanan and Miss Holliday. The latter is lately turned methodist, the former was married the evening I was there to a Mr. Turnbull of Petersburg in Virginia. Of course you will see her there. I find it difficult to procure a tolerable house here. It seems...
I wrote you last on the 4th. instant. In my letter of the 19th. to Mr. Randolph I inclosed one to you from England. I now send a packet from France, which comes from Botidour. I have now been seven weeks from you my dear and have never heard one tittle from you. I write regularly once a week to Mr. Randolph, yourself, or Polly, in hopes it may induce a letter from one of you every week also....
Your’s of the 25th. of April came to hand ten days ago, and yesterday I received Mr. Randolph’s of the 3d. instant. When I wrote to him last week, I hoped to have been soon rid of the periodical headach which had attacked me. It has indeed been remarkeably slight since that, but I am not yet quite clear of it. I expect every fit to be the last. I inclose the newspapers for Mr. Randolph. He...
Your favor of May 28. from Eppington came to me yesterday, with the welcome which accompanies ever the tidings I recieve from you. Your resolution to go to housekeeping is a good one, tho’ I think it had better be postponed till the fall. You are not yet seasoned to the climate, and it would therefore be prudent not to go to a sickly position till the sickly season is over. My former letters...
My last news from you were conveyed in your letter of May 28. I ascribe this to your present ambulatory life. I hope when you are more in the way of the post, I shall receive letters regularly once a week from one or other of you, as I write regularly once a week myself. In my letter of the last week to Mr. Randolph I mentioned the appearances of a war between England and Spain. We have...
I recieved two days ago yours of July 2. with Mr. Randolph’s of July 3 . Mine of the 11th. to Mr. Randolph will have informed you that I expect to set out from hence for Monticello about the 1st. of September. As this depends on the adjournment of Congress and they begin to be impatient, it is more probable I may set out sooner than later. However my letters will keep you better informed as...
Congress being certainly to rise the day after tomorrow, I can now, my dear Patsy, be more certain of the time at which I can be at Monticello, and which I think will be from the 8th. to the 15th. of September: more likely to be sooner than later. I shall leave this about a fortnight hence, but must stay some days to have arrangements taken for my future residence in Philadelphia. I hope to be...
The last letter I recieved from you was of the 2d July. In mine of the 14th. inst. to Mr. Randolph I informed him I should set out the next day to Rhode island with the President. I did so, and returned yesterday, after a very pleasant sail of two days going and two days returning thro the Sound. We visited Newport and Providence, where the President was received with great cordiality. He...
In my letter of last week to Mr. Randolph I mentioned that I should write every Wednesday to him, yourself and Polly alternately, and that my letters arriving at Monticello the Saturday and the answer being sent off on Sunday I should recieve it the day before I should have to write again to the same person, so as that the correspondence with each would be exactly kept up. I hope you will do...
This is a scolding letter for you all. I have not recieved a scrip of a pen from home since I left it which is now eleven weeks. I think it so easy for you to write me one letter every week, which will be but once in three weeks for each of you, when I write one every week who have not one moment’s repose from business from the first to the last moment of the week. Perhaps you think you have...
Mr. Short in a late letter says that your acquaintances in Panthemont complain excessively of your inattention to them and desired him to mention it. Matters there are going on well. The sales of the church lands are succesful beyond all calculation. There has been a riot in Paris in which M. de Castrie’s houshould furniture was destroyed. I am opening my things from Paris as fast as the...
I have this moment recieved yours of January 16. and answer it by the first post. It is indeed an interesting letter to me as it gives me details which I am sure will contribute to your happiness, my first wish. Nothing is so engaging as the little domestic cares into which you appear to be entering, and as to reading it is useful for only filling up the chinks of more useful and healthy...
Your two last letters are those which have given me the greatest pleasure of any I ever recieved from you. The one announced that you were become a notable housewife, the other a mother. This last is undoubtedly the key-stone of the arch of matrimonial happiness, as the first is it’s daily aliment. Accept my sincere congratulations for yourself and Mr. Randolph. I hope you are getting well,...
The present will serve just to tell you that I am well, and to keep up my plan of writing once a week whether I have any thing to say or not. Congress rises tomorrow. They have passed no laws remarkeable except the excise law and one establishing a bank. Mrs. Trist and Mrs. Waters always enquire after you and desire me to remember them to you. I hope you are by this time able to be about again...
The badness of the roads retards the post, so that I have recieved no letter this week from Monticello. I shall hope soon to have one from yourself to know from that that you are perfectly reestablished, that the little Anne is becoming a big one, that you have received Dr. Gregory’s book and are daily profiting from it.—This will hardly reach you in time to put you on the watch for the...
Since I wrote last to you, which was on the 24th. of March, I have received yours of March 22. I am indeed sorry to hear of the situation of Walker Gilmer and shall hope the letters from Monticello will continue to inform me how he does. I know how much his parents will suffer, and how much he merited all their affection.—Mrs. Trist has been so kind as to have your calash made, but either by...
Your letter of April 13. tho’ it came to hand on the 30th. is yet to be acknowleged. That of May 1. I received last night, within seven days of it’s date. The post from Richmond comes I believe in 4. days at this season of the year, so that our correspondence might be very prompt if you had a regular post from Charlottesville to Richmond. I thank you for all the small news of your letters,...
I wrote to Maria yesterday, while sailing on Lake George, and the same kind of leisure is afforded me today to write to you. Lake George is without comparison the most beautiful water I ever saw: formed by a contour of mountains into a bason 35 miles long, and from 2 to 4 miles broad, finely interspersed with islands, its waters limpid as chrystal and the mountain sides covered with rich...
I wrote to each of you once during my journey, from which I returned four days ago, having enjoyed thro’ the whole of it very perfect health. I am in hopes the relaxation it gave me from business has freed me from the almost constant headach with which I had been persecuted thro the whole winter and spring. Having been entirely clear of it while travelling proves it to have been occasioned by...
I have no letter from Monticello later than Maria’s of May 29. which is now six weeks old. This is long, when but one week is necessary for the conveyance. I cannot ascribe all the delay to the Charlottesville post. However to put that out of the way I am negotiating with the postmaster the establishment of a public post from Richmond to Staunton. In this case all the private riders will be...
Your last letter come to hand was of May 23. Consequently it is now two months old. Petit arrived here three or four days ago, and accosted me with an assurance that he was come pour rester toujours avec moi. The principal small news he brings is that Panthemont is one of the convents to be kept up for education, that the old Abbess is living, but Madame de Taubenheim dead, that some of the...
Maria’s letter of July 16. informs me you were all well then. However great my confidence is in the healthy air of Monticello, I am always happy to have my hopes confirmed by letter. The day of my departure is not yet fixed. I hope it will be earlier or later in the first week of September. I know not as yet how I am to get along, as one of my horses is in such a condition as to leave little...
Maria and myself are waiting with impatience to hear that Mr. Randolph and yourself and dear little Anne are well. We now write alternately, once a week, so that the correspondence is become more equal. I now inclose to Mr. Randolph Freneau’s paper instead of Bache’s on account of the bulk of the latter which, being a daily paper, was too much for the post. And Freneau’s two papers contain...
We are well here, tho’ still without news from Mr. Randolph or yourself, tho’ we have been eight weeks from Monticello. Maria was to have written to you to-day, but she has been so closely engaged in pasting paper together in the form of a pocket book that she has not been able. She has been constantly getting colds since she came here. I have put on board Capt Stratton a box with the...
Your’s of Nov. 29. and Mr. Randolph’s of Nov. 28. came to hand five days ago. They brought us the first news we had received from Monticello since we left it. A day or two after, Mr. Millar of Charlottesville arrived here and gave us information of a little later date, and particularly of Colo. Lewis and Mrs. Gilmer’s illness. His account of Mrs. Gilmer was alarming, and I am anxious to hear...
Having no particular subject for a letter, I find none more soothing to my mind than to indulge itself in expressions of the love I bear you, and the delight with which I recall the various scenes thro which we have passed together, in our wanderings over the world. These reveries alleviate the toils and inquietudes of my present situation, and leave me always impressed with the desire of...
I was prevented writing to you last week by a bad cold attended with fever: and this week I have nothing to say but that I find myself nearly well, and to repeat the assurances of my love to you. Maria is well, and has come to a resolution to write to you no more. Whether this arises most from resentment or laziness I do not know. Mr. Randolph’s last letter received was of Dec. 29, yours of...
We are in daily expectation of hearing of your safe return to Monticello, and all in good health. The season is now coming on when I shall envy your occupations in the feilds and garden, while I am shut up drudging within four walls. Maria is well and lazy, therefore does not write. Your friends Mrs. Trist and Mrs. Waters are well also, and often enquire after you. We have nothing new or...
Yours of Feb. 20. came to me with that welcome which every thing brings from you. It is a relief to be withdrawn from the torment of the scenes amidst which we are. Spectators of the heats and tumults of conflicting parties, we cannot help participating of their feelings. I should envy you the tranquil occupations of your situation were it not that I value your happiness more than my own. But...
Mr. Randolph’s letter of the 18th. has been received since my last. The one it covered for Great Britain is sent by the packet now about to sail from New York. His commission to Doctor Barton shall be fulfilled to-day. Maria is with me keeping her Easter holidays. She is well. She allows herself to write but one letter a week, and having written to some acquaintance already she has nothing but...