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Notes for the clear rents of the Upper & Lower fields of Henderson ’s lands 1807. Nov. 17. possession was delivered by John Henderson . D  1808.9. T. E. Randolph pd rent for the Dower house & lands & the upper field 90   he then gave up the lands & paid for the house & garden 60.  consequently the lands had been rated @ 30.  deduct for the Dower lands 15. a s 15
2Memorandum Books, 1809 (Jefferson Papers)
Jan. 2. Printer’s carrier .50. Lemaire’s accts. Dec. 3. to Dec. 31. 08     provns.  servts. ice cont. total   meat buttr. eggs veget.    
Memoranda for the President Information having been recieved in October last that many intruders had settled on the lands of the Cherokees & Chickasaws; the letter from Genl. Dearborn to Colo. Meigs was written to have them ordered off, & to inform them they would be removed by military force in the spring if still on the lands. These orders remain still to be given, & they should go to the...
Information having been recieved in October last that many intruders had settled on the lands of the Cherokees & Chickasaws; the letter from Genl. Dearborn to Colo. Meigs was written to have them ordered off, & to inform them they would be removed by military force in the spring if still on the lands. These orders remain still to be given, & they should go to the officer commanding at...
I know no other Apology for the Liberty I have taken than that of Dire Necessity and As I know you to be a man of few words I will proceed briefly to state my case to you I have been engaged all this Winter in writing a political pamphlet entitled Thoughts, on the Administration, of our late President, Thomas Jefferson. (Which I hope will meet with due encouragement from all true Republicans)...
Memoranda for the President. Information having been recieved in October last that many intruders had settled on the lands of the Cherokees & Chickasaws; the letter from Gen l Dearborn to Col o Meigs was written to have them ordered off, & to inform them they would be removed by military force in the spring if still on the lands. these orders remain still to be given, & they should go to the...
Thomas Jefferson Esq r To Jo s Dougherty D r D –cts To 40 30 bushels oats a 40 cts per bushel 12 –00 To a stable broom
As you now retire from the great theatre of political action, after having spent a number of years in the immediate service of your country—Permit us to hail your retreat from the important office you so lately filled with honor and dignity—to the calm retreats of domestic life. With hearts abounding with gratitude to you as an instrument in the hand of divine Providence, in promoting the...
The Citizens of Washington cannot forego the last opportunity, which may, perhaps ever occur, to bid you a respectful and affectionate farewell. As members of the great and flourishing nation, over which you have so illustriously presided, your virtues, talents, and services command their esteem, admiration and gratitude. Embarked in the fate of this solitary republic of the world, they have...
I recieve with peculiar gratification the affectionate address of the citizens of Washington , and in the patriotic sentiments it expresses, I see the true character of the National Metropolis . the station which we occupy among the nations of the earth is honourable, but awful. trusted with the destinies of this solitary republic of the world, the only monument of human rights, & the sole...
I recieved last night your favor of the 3 d and am very sensible of the kind wishes of my friends at Fredericksbg that I should pass a day with them on my return home. at any other season I should have done this with great pleasure; but we have such terrible information of the impassable state of the roads that I dare not attempt it. the route I go is by cross roads altogether, not cut by...
Your liberality and goodness will pardon the liberty I take in addressing this note to you. Believing that if you can be satisfied of my reputation and real character as a moral and honest young man, and of my competency to fill the situation of a clerk in one of the departments, you will be kind enough to interest yourself in my favor, I beg leave to solicit your patronage, in procuring a...
I was favored with your’s accompanying the wool , on the 21 st ult ; and have delayed answering untill I could make my-self sufficiently acquainted with the subject and communicate such facts as would enable you to form some oppinion on it yourself— I find non of the wool you alude as sold so high in N York , has been employed by our hatters;— and M r Tybout says when wool is much disposed to...
This will be handed you by mr Coles , the bearer of public dispatches, by an Aviso . he has lived with me as Secretary, is my wealthy neighbor at Monticello , & worthy of all confidence. his intimate knolege of our situation has induced us to send him, because he will be a full supplement as to all those things which cannot be detailed in writing. he can possess you of our present situation...
The republicans and friends of the late administration, of George Town , animated by the purest sentiments of gratitude and affection, beg leave to express to you those emotions inspired by the interesting crisis of your departure from public life. Devoted as you have been for so long a period of time, to the service of your country, endeared by your unceasing cares for our national...
M r Gimbrede has the honor to offer to M r Jefferson a Little Sketch in Cameo , which if he should deem it worthy of his acceptance, he will please to receive it, as an evidence of my Esteem & high consideration, with an unfeigned wish that in your retirement—you may experience that tranquility & happiness that your usefulness in public Life has so Eminently entitled you to. RC ( DLC );...
I recieved safely your letter of May 30. & with it your astronomical work & Political essay on the kingdom of New Spain , for which I return you my sincere thanks. I had before heard that this work had begun to appear, & the specimen I have recieved proves that it will not disappoint the expectations of the learned. besides making known to us one of the most singular & interesting countries on...
candidates Sec retary of State War Missisi pi Gov r v. Williams Holmes .
In conformity to a resolution entered into by the republican Citizens of Washington County in the State of Maryland , assembled at Hagers Town , we, the Chairman and the Secretary of the meeting, have the honor of transmitting to you the following extract from their proceedings.—we remain with sentiments of the highest esteem and respect N. Rochester W m L. Brent
I have seen in your Cabinet, a Geranium , which I understood you cultivated with your own hands. If you do not take it home with you, I entreat you to leave it with me. I cannot tell you how inexpressibly precious it will be to my heart. It shall be attended with the assiduity of affection & watered, with tears of regret; & each day as I attend it, will I invoke the best blessings of Heaven,...
Th: Jefferson presents his respectful salutations to mrs Smith, and sends her the Geranium she expressed a willingness to recieve. it is in very bad condition, having been neglected latterly as not intended to be removed. he cannot give it his parting blessing more effectually than by consigning it to the nourishing hand of mrs Smith. if plants have sensibility, as the analogy of their...
Th: Jefferson asks the favor of mr Smith to print for him 100. copies of the within letter each on a separate sheet of 4 to letter paper. he would be glad to have them by Thursday evening if practicable. he salutes him with esteem & respect. RC ( DLC : Henley Smith Papers); dateline at foot of text; endorsed by Smith. Not recorded in SJL . Samuel Harrison Smith (1772–1845) was born in...
THE friendship which has long subsisted between the President of the United States and myself gave me reason to expect, on my retirement from office, that I might often receive applications to interpose with him on behalf of persons desiring appointments. Such an abuse of his dispositions towards me would necessarily lead to the loss of them, and to the transforming me from the character of a...
The President of the UStates To John Barnes , 1809. Feb y 8 th for 12 lb dipt Candles @ 20 d 1 0
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Gimbrede and his thanks for the very elegant Cameo he has been so kind as to send him. he considers it as a flattering mark of the indulgence with which mr Gimbrede has been so good as to contemplate his public conduct, and it adds to the consolation he recieves from the testimony of the worthy that the purity of his intentions, at least, has atoned...
On the 28 th of Dec r last , I received your letter of the 14 th in which you are pleased to observe—“that you should have read the book *Horrors of Slavery I sent you with more satisfaction, had you found the author’s position in it more equal to his talents.” All men are fond of receiving satisfaction, and I trust, Sir, you will encrease yours by contributing to make some alteration in my...
Thomas Jefferson Esq r 1807 To Joseph Milligan November 7 th To 1 Malthus on population—2 vols Calf Gilt $ 8 – 00 1808 March 8
The affectionate address of the Republicans of George Town on my retirement from public duty, is received with sincere pleasure. in the review of my political life, which they so indulgently take, if it be found that I have done my duty as other faithful Citizens have done, it is all the merit I claim. Our lot has been cast on an Awful period of human history. the contest which began with us...
It is with much concern I inform you that the Senate has negatived your appointment. we thought it best to keep back the nomination to the close of the session, that the mission might remain secret as long as possible, which you know was our purpose from the beginning. it was then sent in with an explanation of it’s object & motives. we took for granted, if any hesitation should arise, that...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Threlkeld and takes the liberty of asking a few small plants of the English mulberry & peach-Apricot, of which mr Threlkeld thought he could spare some. Th:J. can convey only such & so many as are very portable, & will occupy but little space. he begs leave to present to mr & mrs Threlkeld & family his friendly Adieux, and assurances of his sincere...