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Documents filtered by: Period="Jefferson Presidency" AND Correspondent="Jefferson, Thomas"
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Th. Jefferson presents his respects to Mr. Adams and incloses him a letter which came to his hands last night; on reading what is written within the cover, he concluded it to be a private letter, and without opening a single paper within it he folded it up & now has the honor to inclose it to Mr Adams, with the homage of his high consideration and respect. MHi : Adams Papers.
I have recd your favour of March 8 with the Letter inclosed, for which I thank you. Inclosed is a Letter to one of your Domesticks Joseph Dougherty. Had you read the Papers inclosed they might have given you a moment of Melancholly or at least of Sympathy with a mourning Father. They relate wholly to the Funeral of a son who was once the delight of my Eyes and a darling of my heart, cutt off...
Had you been no other than the private inhabitant of Monticelo, I should e’er this time, have addrest you with that Sympathy which a recent even has awakened in my Bosom, but reasons of various kinds withheld my pen, untill the powerfull feelings of my Heart, burst through the restraints, and call’d upon me to shed the tear of sorrow over the departed remains of your beloved and deserving...
The affectionate sentiments which you have had the goodness to express in your letter of May 20. towards my dear departed daughter, have awakened in me sensibilities natural to the occasion, & recalled your kindnesses to her which I shall ever remember with gratitude & friendship. I can assure you with truth they had made an indelible impression on her mind, and that, to the last, on our...
your Letter of June 13th came duly to hand; if it had contained no other Sentiments and opinions than those which my Letter of condolence could have excited, and which are expressed in the first page of your reply,. our correspondence would have terminated here: but you have been pleased to enter upon some Subjects which call for a reply: and as you observe that you have wished for an...
Your favor of the 1st. inst. was duly recieved, and I would not again have intruded on you but to rectify certain facts which seem not to have been presented to you under their true aspect. My charities to Callendar are considered as rewards for his calumnies. as early, I think, as 1796, I was told in Philadelphia that Callendar, the author of the Political progress of Britain, was in that...
Your Letter of July 22d. was by some mistake in the post office at Boston sent back as far as Newyork, so that it did not reach me untill the Eleventh of this Month. Candour requires of me a reply. Your statment respecting Callender, and your motives for liberating him wear a different aspect as explaind by you, from the impression which it had made; not only upon my mind, but upon the minds...
your Letter of July 22d was by some mistake in the post office at Boston sent back as far as Newyork, so that it did not reach me untill the eleventh of this Month. Candour requires of me a reply. your statement respecting Callender, (who was the wretch referd to) and your motives for liberating him, wear a different aspect as explaind by you, from the impression which they had made, not only...
Your letter, Madam, of the 18th. of Aug. has been some days recieved, but a press of business has prevented the acknolegement of it: perhaps indeed I may have already trespassed too far on your attention. With those who wish to think amiss of me, I have learnt to be perfectly indifferent: but where I know a mind to be ingenuous, & to need only truth to set it to rights, I cannot be as passive....
Sickness for three weeks past, has prevented my acknowledging the receipt of your Letter of Septr. 11th. when I first addrest you, I little thought of entering into a correspondence with you upon Subjects of a political nature. I will not regret it, as it has led to some elucidations and brought on some explanations, which place in a more favorable light, occurrences which had wounded me....