You
have
selected

  • Period

    • Jefferson Presidency
  • Correspondent

    • Jefferson, Thomas

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Period="Jefferson Presidency" AND Correspondent="Jefferson, Thomas"
Results 1-30 of 15,783 sorted by editorial placement
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Th. Jefferson presents his respects to Mr. Adams and incloses him a letter which came to his hands last night; on reading what is written within the cover, he concluded it to be a private letter, and without opening a single paper within it he folded it up & now has the honor to inclose it to Mr Adams, with the homage of his high consideration and respect. MHi : Adams Papers.
I have recd your favour of March 8 with the Letter inclosed, for which I thank you. Inclosed is a Letter to one of your Domesticks Joseph Dougherty. Had you read the Papers inclosed they might have given you a moment of Melancholly or at least of Sympathy with a mourning Father. They relate wholly to the Funeral of a son who was once the delight of my Eyes and a darling of my heart, cutt off...
Had you been no other than the private inhabitant of Monticelo, I should e’er this time, have addrest you with that Sympathy which a recent even has awakened in my Bosom, but reasons of various kinds withheld my pen, untill the powerfull feelings of my Heart, burst through the restraints, and call’d upon me to shed the tear of sorrow over the departed remains of your beloved and deserving...
The affectionate sentiments which you have had the goodness to express in your letter of May 20. towards my dear departed daughter, have awakened in me sensibilities natural to the occasion, & recalled your kindnesses to her which I shall ever remember with gratitude & friendship. I can assure you with truth they had made an indelible impression on her mind, and that, to the last, on our...
your Letter of June 13th came duly to hand; if it had contained no other Sentiments and opinions than those which my Letter of condolence could have excited, and which are expressed in the first page of your reply,. our correspondence would have terminated here: but you have been pleased to enter upon some Subjects which call for a reply: and as you observe that you have wished for an...
Your favor of the 1st. inst. was duly recieved, and I would not again have intruded on you but to rectify certain facts which seem not to have been presented to you under their true aspect. My charities to Callendar are considered as rewards for his calumnies. as early, I think, as 1796, I was told in Philadelphia that Callendar, the author of the Political progress of Britain, was in that...
Your Letter of July 22d. was by some mistake in the post office at Boston sent back as far as Newyork, so that it did not reach me untill the Eleventh of this Month. Candour requires of me a reply. Your statment respecting Callender, and your motives for liberating him wear a different aspect as explaind by you, from the impression which it had made; not only upon my mind, but upon the minds...
your Letter of July 22d was by some mistake in the post office at Boston sent back as far as Newyork, so that it did not reach me untill the eleventh of this Month. Candour requires of me a reply. your statement respecting Callender, (who was the wretch referd to) and your motives for liberating him, wear a different aspect as explaind by you, from the impression which they had made, not only...
Your letter, Madam, of the 18th. of Aug. has been some days recieved, but a press of business has prevented the acknolegement of it: perhaps indeed I may have already trespassed too far on your attention. With those who wish to think amiss of me, I have learnt to be perfectly indifferent: but where I know a mind to be ingenuous, & to need only truth to set it to rights, I cannot be as passive....
Sickness for three weeks past, has prevented my acknowledging the receipt of your Letter of Septr. 11th. when I first addrest you, I little thought of entering into a correspondence with you upon Subjects of a political nature. I will not regret it, as it has led to some elucidations and brought on some explanations, which place in a more favorable light, occurrences which had wounded me....
I have duly recieved your letter of the 28th. of July expressing a wish that your brother could find some emploiment in New Orleans in which his knolege of the French and Spanish languages might be made useful. it would have been pleasing to me to have been able to point out such an emploiment, & more so to add that any such was within my powers of appointment, but the only appointments I make...
Thomas Jefferson , President of the United States of America, To all who shall see these presents, Greeting : Know Ye , That reposing especial trust and confidence in the patriotism, integrity and abilities of James Madison of Virginia, I have nominated, and, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, do appoint him Secretary of State, and do authorize and empower him to execute and...
Since my last which went by the mail in course, the papers of my deceased father have been opened. His will was made thirteen years ago, since which two of my brothers have died, one of them leaving a large number of children mostly minors, and both of them intestate. The will itself, besides the lapsed legacies, does not cover all the property held at the time; & valuable parcels of property...
I offer you my sincere condolances on the melancholy loss, which has detained you at home: and am entirely sensible of the necessities it will have imposed on you for further delay. Mr. Lincoln has undertaken the duties of your office per interim, and will continue till you can come. Genl. Dearborn is in the War Department. Mr. Gallatin, though unappointed, has staid till now to give us the...
I am still here. Three refusals of the Naval Secretaryship have been re[c]ieved, and I am afraid of recieving a 4th. this evening from mr. Jones of Phila. In that case Genl. Smith has agreed to take it pro tempore, so as to give me time; and I hope the moment it is in either his or Jones’s hands, to get away; but this may be yet three four or five days. Lincoln is doing the duties of your...
I shall be with you on the 25th. unless health or weather prevent. But if you propose leaving home sooner for Washington, do not let my coming prevent you. Only, in that case, if convenient, lodge word at Gordon’s, or write me by next post, that you will be gone; as I should then wish to lengthen my day’s journey. I have not been able to look yet into my newspapers, but I presume yours contain...
Your favor of the 17th. came to hand by the last mail. You will find us at home on saturday. It would have been expedient on some accounts to have set out before that day, but it has been rendered impossible by several circumstances, particularly by an attack on my health which kept me in bed 3 or 4 days, and which has not yet permitted me to leave the House. I hope to be able to begin the...
I received yesterday your’s of the 22d. & learn with regret that you have been so unwell. This & the state of the ⟨country, the river &⟩ roads should delay your departure, at least till the weather is better. I should have set out this morning, but it is still raining, and the river all but ⟨swimm⟩ing at the last ford. If these circumstances are more favorable tomorrow I shall then set out, or...
I hasten the return of the bearer that he may meet you at Brown’s and convey you information as to the road. From Songster’s I tried the road by Ravensworth, which comes into the turnpike road 4½ miles below Fairfax courthouse. There are about 2 miles of it which I think cannot be passed by your carriage without oversetting; and consulting with Colo. Wren who knows both roads, he says there is...
A person of the name of Thompson, of Amherst county in Virginia has asked my interference for the recovery of his son John Thompson understood to be impressed on board the Squirrel a British vessel of war. The inclosed letter gave him the first information he has recieved from him for some time past, for so long a time indeed that he had apprehended he was dead. He thinks the letter not...
I observe a great number of contracts for carrying the mails are advertised to be made within a short time hence, & for 4. years. I suppose the principal reason for making such long contracts is the trouble which would be so often recurring to the post office, if they were shorter. This should have it’s just weight: but it may be doubted whether contracts for so long a time as 4. years do not...
The application of William Greetham for a Mediterranean pass for a vessel owned here, tho built abroad, being unauthorised by practice, tho’ perhaps not by law, and concerning the departments of both the State & Treasury, I ask the favor of mr. Madison and mr. Gallatin to give me their opinions thereon: at the same time I communicate to them what passed on the subject of passports under...
I suggested some time ago to Col. Habersham the objections to a Contract for 4 years for carrying the mail. His reply was that frequent contracts would not only be very troublesome, but by lessening the value of contracts, discourage good undertakers. He added that a clause in the contracts reserved to him a right at all time to make any of regulations he might chuse, making at the same time...
Th: Jefferson returns to mr. Madison Erving’s letter to Genl. Dearborne, & approves of a commission to him as Consul at London. Where to find a competent successor for Lisbon he knows not, unless Gilman, who refused St. Domingo, will accept this. Perhaps Genl. Dearborne can judge. The place must be reserved for a man of real diplomatic abilities. Marchant’s case will be the subject of further...
9 July 1801, Baltimore. Warns that Habersham’s changes in the mail route from Philadelphia to Pittsburgh greatly alarm and distress citizens of Carlisle and Shippensburg and appear to be a plot to make Jefferson’s administration unpopular there. Conveys political intelligence: “Mr. Montgomery says he has now little Doubt but Harford County will give himself & another Republican Elector.” RC (...
Whether prizes & the proceeds of them taken after the date of the treaty with France can be restored by the Executive, or need an act of the legislature? The constitution has authorised the ordinary legislature alone to declare war against any foreign nation. If they may enact a perfect, they may a qualified war, as was done against France. In this state of things they may modify the acts of...
The following memoranda, & the inclosed letter from Mr. Dallas will present to the President the state of the information in the office of State on the subject of the indictmt. under the sedition act agst. Duane, at the request of the Senate. The President will observe, that another prosecution agst. him, at Common law , is pending in the same Court. 16. May. 1800. Mr: Lee’s letter to Mr....
It is objected that the act of Congress Mar. 3. 1800. c. 14. sect. 1. 2. entitles a citizen owner of a vessel to restitution until the vessel has been condemned by competent authority on paying salvage to the captor. Every man, by the law of nature, and every fellow citizen by compact, is bound to assist another against violence to his person or property. Tho’ therefore by the law of nature...
With respect to the prosecutions against Thomas & others for a misdemeanor at Common law we ought to presume the judges will do right, and to give them an opportunity of doing so. The Executive ought not to sit in previous judgment on every case & to say whether it shall or shall not go before the judges. I think therefore this case ought to go on to trial, without interference of the...
Th: Jefferson presents his affectionate salutations to mr. Madison & sends him the inclosed which will explain itself. He hopes to see him & family at Monticello when most convenient to themselves; and observes for his information that the road through Shadwell is put into fine order, the right hand at issuing from the ford on this side to be greatly preferred to the left. The road by Milton...