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Documents filtered by: Period="Jefferson Presidency" AND Correspondent="Jefferson, Thomas"
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By the President of the United States Whereas by the first Article of the Terms and conditions declared by the President of the United States on the 17th. day of October 1791, for regulating the Materials and manner of Buildings and Improvements on the Lots in the City of Washington it is provided, “that the outer and party Walls of all Houses in the said City, shall be built of Brick or Stone...
I thank you much for yours of the 12th. Feby. and the inclosed pamphlet. No one can doubt the justice of a general maritime law, calculated to support neutral trade; but has not the author of common sense been rather fanciful in his detail. In the proposition of a law, which must necessarily be forced down the throat of the greatest maritime power extant, might not trivial aberrations from...
My friend and Relation, Mr. Richard Brent informed me some time ago , that he had signified my wish to you of becoming your private Secretary; and I make no doubt that his partiality for me induced him to give the highest colouring to my Pretensions to that Office. My Object in troubling you now, is respectfully to renew this Subject, though I do it with the utmost diffidence, and under the...
Great Monark—please to pardon my Boldness in troubling your Honour with those lines. I single Surcomstance hapened with in the Surcomferance of my acquaintance which I think worthy of notice—But Shold your wisdom—and prudiance think it not worthey of the Slightest Glance—I humbley submit to your Superior judgement in this Case—Being moved By this Surcomstance in pity to this famely about whom...
I have just conversed with a Gentleman well acquainted with Mr. Duvall’s situation in Annapolis. He says that Mr. D. has little or no property in that place to attach him to it, on that account—that his present Salary, as a Judge, is no more than $1600—and that he has no doubt that Mr. D. would accept the office of chief Justice of this District. I take the liberty of communicating this...
The artist & subscriber presumes to lay before you a Print to the Immortality of George Washington, for your Patronage; representing this Citizen ascending on light clouds from Mt. Vernon; on his Dexter hand are Portraits of the Heroes Warren, & Montgomery, taken from Trumbulls Paintings ;— In submitting this Print to your Protection, I must avail myself of this opportunity of wishing every...
Agreably to your directions I send a copy of the record of the last session. The preceeding copy is in books deposited in the office of the late Secy to the President US or probably may be found in the office of the late Secretary for the department of State. I send you also a copy of everything printed during the Session as complete as is in my power. Should however any particular report be...
So far as the enclosed Certificates may justify I presume to place myself before you as a Candidate for office, whenever it may be your pleasure, or occation may occur, to turn your attention to our state. In the Middle age of life, heretofore used to commercial pursuits, with a wife and family now distressed by the effect of political persecution, a Mind unambitious and Moderate Views, I...
The Ship Ganges Captain Mullowny, of 24 Guns, sailed the 26th Jany. 1801 for Batavia , to cruise a few months in the Straits of Sunda for the protection of our East India trade the principal danger being from Privateers from the Isle of France, and to return with as many vessels under Convoy as could be collected. It was always intended to send after her, the Ship Connecticut , of the same...
I offer you my sincere condolances on the melancholy loss, which has detained you at home: and am entirely sensible of the necessities it will have imposed on you for further delay. Mr. Lincoln has undertaken the duties of your office per interim, and will continue till you can come. Genl. Dearborn is in the War Department. Mr. Gallatin, though unappointed, has staid till now to give us the...