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    • Randolph, Martha Jefferson
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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Randolph, Martha Jefferson" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency" AND Correspondent="Jefferson, Thomas"
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We are all well here, my ever dear Martha, but I shall not be able probably to set out tomorrow, but shall on Tuesday. we shall be five days on the road. in the mean time the roads will be getting better, & the weather perhaps milder. but indeed it looks as if this winter would run through the summer. not a bud is swelled here yet, except of the red Maple. kiss our dear children for me, and be...
My journey to this place was not as free from accident as usual. I was near losing Castor in the Rapidan, by his lying down in the river, where waste deep, & being so embarrassed by the shafts of the carriage & harness that he was nearly drowned before the servants, jumping into the water, could lift his head out & cut him loose from the carriage. this was followed by the loss of my travelling...
In the instant of the departure of the post Genl. Dearborne calls on me to know the name of a person for whom I applied to be made a Cadet; and I have forgotten the name, & cannot find it on a review of your letters, altho’ I know it was through you that the application came. pray let me know it by return of post; and I will keep the place open a few days. Genl. Dearborne leaves us in a few...
Mr. Bacon delivered your letter & every thing else safely. I had ordered a gross of bottles to be bought: but I will now countermand them. I send on corks by the stage, for I think that water casks should be trusted no longer than necessary. the letter & bundle for Jefferson shall be forwarded. certainly the residue of Buffon ought to be sent on to him to the care of mr Jefferson. when he went...
I have just recieved information from mr Jefferson that my shipwrecked goods are gone on from Richmond to Monticello (3. casks excepted which he supposes plundered) and that they appear to be in good condition. as a knolege of what gets safe & in good condition will dispense with my sending on a duplicate provision, I have directed mr Bacon to open all the packages & report to me their...
The letter to mr Hackley shall go by a government vessel which sails for Cadiz the 10th. of this month. such a one will sail monthly for Falmouth, Brest, Lisbon & Cadiz during the embargo. this will furnish his friends a regular means of writing to him. Mr. Hackley has nothing to apprehend from mr Meade as the successor to mr. Yznardi. Meade’s intrigues against Yznardi, and his indecent...
I recieved yesterday your letter of the 5th. & mr Randolph’s of the 6th. and I have this morning sent an extract of the latter to mr Nicholas. I sincerely wish it success, but I am afraid mr Carr has been misinformed of mr Patterson’s views, or, which is as likely, that mr Patterson has changed them. he has certainly concluded to settle on a tract of 5. or 600. acres which he gets from mr...
Altho’ this letter which goes by the carts, will not reach you till Monday evening, and that which I shall write you by the post of tomorrow evening will reach you on Monday morning, yet I cannot omit to drop you a line lest any accident should delay that by mail. mr Randolph continues well. eats with appetite sleeps tolerably, reads: and has not had the smallest return of fever since it left...
I arrived here this day week, having travelled through the rain of that day rather than stay in disagreeable quarters. I experienced no inconvenience from it. the Marquis Yrujo arrived two days after me, and mr Madison & Genl. Dearborne got here the last night. the latter has left his family in Maine for the winter. Yrujo is said to be very ill, taken two days ago. I inclose a magazine for...
I inclose you a letter for T. B. Randolph containing his appointment as a Cadet. but the lodgings at the Military school at Westpoint being entirely full, he cannot be recieved there till the 1st. of March. indeed he could do nothing there sooner, as their vacation begins with November & ends with February. Genl. Dearborne proposed to me yesterday a new regulation respecting the Cadets. there...
I presume mr Randolph writes to you and informs you he continues well. he has rode twice on horseback; yesterday about 4. miles without feeling it. my fit of yesterday was so mild that I have some hope of missing it to-day. I write this in the morning, but will keep it open till the evening to add the result of the day. we both think we may very safely fix on Monday sennight for our departure,...
I arrived here on Sunday morning (May 30.) to breakfast without having experienced any accident on the road, other than being twice taken in soaking rains: but my water proof coat was a perfect protection. mr and mrs Madison arrived the day after. I find they have not yet got clear of the measles here, so that either at home or here your family will hardly escape it. it is now time for you to...
I recieved Anne’s letter by the last post , in which she forgot to mention the health of the family, but I presume it good. I inclose you a medal executed by an artist lately from Europe and who appears to be equal to any in the world. it is taken from Houdon’s bust, for he never saw me. it sells the more readily as the prints which have been offered the public are such miserable caracatures....
Your’s of the 19. came to hand yesterday. as it says nothing of your health I presume all are well. I recieved yesterday also a letter from Maria of the 18th. she was then well & preparing to go to Eppington, and in about 4. weeks expected to set out for Albemarle. mr Eppes was engaged in his harvest much obstructed by rain, & regretting he had not before deposited Maria at Monticello. I hope...
Mr. Randolph’s convalescence proceeds steadily, not a single circumstance having arisen to throw him back. yet his strength increases slowly. as yet he only rides out in the carriage every day. it will not be till he can get on horseback that we can judge when he will be able to travel. my fits of head-ach have shortened from 9 hours to 5. but they have stuck some days at 5. hours, and when...
I inclose you a letter from Jefferson which I presume will inform you he is well, and I send you one from Dr. Wistar which will give you satisfaction. be so good as to return it. I had one from Anne 2. or 3. days ago, when all were well. she says they will be with us early in March. I sent you the last week by the post rider your watch, watch key & ring, which I hope got safe to hand. I forgot...
I was taken with a tooth-ache about 5. days ago, which brought on a very large & hard swelling of the face, & that produced a fever which left me last night. the swelling has subsided sensibly, but whether it will terminate without suppuration is still uncertain. my hope is that I shall be well enough to recieve my company on New Year’s day. indeed I have never been confined by it to my...
I recieved, my dear daughter, your’s of the 13th . by post. I regret extremely the situation of your family, not only for my disappointment here, but for what they are to suffer. I acknolege that, knowing when I came away the measles were in the neighborhood, I saw it was but too possible your visit here would be delayed. as it is, we must agree to the fall visit, and as Maria will be at...
A letter from mr Randolph to mr Coles informs him he shall bring you here, but does not say if with or without the family; I shall rejoice my dear to receive you here, and them, or as many of them that you can bring. I feel much for what you will suffer on the road for such a spell of severe weather we have not known for years. the thermometer has been down of mornings at 14. 12. 10. and once...
I have barely time to tell you that mrs Madison has executed your desires and I dare say to your mind. the commission to me has given me the greatest pleasure, as it always would that you would say to me freely at all times what want you have which I could gratify. my wishes are always to do what would be pleasing to you; but knowing nothing of what would be proper or acceptable, I do nothing....
We got in good time to dinner at Montpelier the day I left you, and the next two days being cool, we reached this place a little in the night, having come a little over 100. miles in the two days without inconvenience to ourselves or horses. mr Madison arrived here the next day. mr Gallatin & Rodney are still absent. mr Ogilvie has been here sometime lecturing, to very unequal audiences of...
A promise made to a friend some years ago, but executed only lately, has placed my religious creed on paper. I have thought it just that my family, by possessing this, should be enabled to estimate the libels published against me on this, as on every other possible subject. I have written to Philadelphia for Doctr. Priestley’s history of the corruptions of Christianity, which I will send you,...
Your letter of the 11th. recieved here on the 15th. is the last news I have of you. mr Randolph having written to mr Coles that he should be here on the 15th. & not having come, & no letter from you by that post, I was thrown into inexpressible anxiety lest a relapse into your complaint should have called him to Edgehill. from this I was not relieved till three days ago when a letter from mr...
I presume mr Randolph informs you himself that he is quite well. indeed I have no doubt he could now very safely undertake the journey; but we continue to fix on Monday next for departure. as to myself altho’ I have no actual head-ach, yet about 9. oclock every morning I have a very quickened pulse come on, a disturbed head, & tender eyes, not amounting to absolute pain. it goes off about...
Mr. Randolph continues well without the least retrograde circumstance. he sleeps well, walks a good deal about the house, rides out in the carriage every day this cruel weather will permit & breakfasts & dines with us. but his strength returns so slowly that he certainly will not be able to undertake his journey on Monday as we had hoped. indeed I do not think a time can be fixed. when he...
My last letters from Edgehill mentioned that you had been indisposed but had got the better of it. having no letter from Edgehill by this mail I can only hope you continue well.—in a conversation with you on the subject of Jefferson’s going to Philadelphia you mentioned that mr Randolph thought of declining it, and I do not know whether I inferred rightly, from what you said that a supposed...
I forgot to bring with me the gravy spoons to be converted into Dessert spoons. I must therefore pray you to send them to me. I think you mentioned a spare ladle. two ladles I think are necessary. if there be more it may come. if any body should be coming from your neighborhood to Washington, by the stage , they might be packed in a great mass of waste paper & a light box. Shoemaker or J....
As it seems now tolerably probable that the British squadron in our bay have not in contemplation to commit any hostile act, other than the remaining there in defiance & bringing to the vessels which pass in & out, we are making all the arrangements preparatory to the possible state of war, that they may be going on, while we take our usual recess. in the course of three or four days a...
I recieved yesterday yours of the 2d. my fever left me the day I wrote to you, and the swelling abated through the whole face, but still remains in a knot as big as a pigeon’s egg, over the diseased tooth, which has now been suppurating so long that the Doctr. thinks he shall have to extract the tooth (altho’ perfectly sound) to prevent a caries of the bone. a day or two will decide. in the...
I am in hopes, my dear Martha, that I shall hear by the arrival of tomorrow morning’s post, that you are all well. in the mean while the arrangement is such that my letter must go hence this evening. my last letter was from mr Eppes of Oct. 3. when all were well. I inclose a Crazy Jane for Anne, and a sweetheart for Ellen. the latter instead of the many coloured stories which she cannot yet...
John delivered safely your letter of the 14th. I am sorry you did not continue at Monticello until your house was in compleat readiness for you. you will run the double risk of green plaister, & a less perfect preparation of it for your winter’s residence. I do not know what stores remained for your consumption, but it is always my wish you should take whatever does remain. many of them will...
I wrote to you the last week, but a pressure of business at the time prevented my answering a part of your letter of the 16th. Jan. the regret which you there expressed at the supposed effect of your visit to this place on my ordinary expences, gives me real uneasiness, and has little foundation. your being here with your family scarcely added any thing sensible to the ordinary expences of the...
I recieved yesterday mr Randolph’s letter of the 11th. and at the same time one from mr Eppes . he had just carried Maria to Eppington with the loss of a horse on the road. they are to leave Eppington tomorrow at farthest for Monticello, so that by the time you recieve this they will be with you. from what mr Randolph writes I should think you had better go over at once with your sister to...
My latest news from Edgehill was Ellen’s letter of the 1st. inst. which seems to have closed her weekly engagements, as otherwise the 8th. & 15th. would have been here. I think Congress will certainly rise on the 25th. the only question of length is the giving the Executive a power to suspend the embargo in the events of peace or of the orders & decrees being withdrawn. the members seem...
Your letter of the 2d. my dear Martha, which was not recieved till the last night has raised me to life again. for four days past I had gone through inexpressible anxiety. the mail which left you on the 5th. will probably be here tonight, and will I hope strengthen our hopes of Maria’s continuing to recover, and mr Eppes’s arrival which I presume was on the 6th. will render her spirits...
It is a considerrible time, my very dear Martha, since I have written because I have been in expectation you were all at Eppington: and tho’ I have not heard of your return to Edgehill, I presume it has taken place. I have some hope of being able to leave this on the 23d. & to be with you on the 26th. but it is possible I may not be able to get thro’ my business. mr Gallatin & Smith are gone....
The last post-days have slipt away from me without adverting to them till too late. I learnt by a letter from Maria that you all got home safe, after a very disagreeable journey. indeed I suffered for you in imagination beyond any thing I had long felt. I found the road, in the short distance I went with you, so much worse than I expected, that I augured a dreadful journey, and sincerely...
I yesterday recieved letters from mr Eppes & Maria. she has been for a considerable time very unwell, with low but constant fevers, and the child very unwell also. mrs Eppes had gone there and staid with her till she was well enough to be removed to Eppington, where the air & the bark had already produced a favorable effect. she wishes to proceed to Monticello as soon as she is strong enough,...
I wrote you on Monday evening, and then expected that a morning or two more would have produced a compleat intermission of mr Randolph’s fever. but it did not. yesterday morning the remission was such as to leave the fever scarcely sensible, and at 3. P.M. the usual hour of it’s access it was more moderate than it has ever been. I left him at 4. P.M. with not much fever, entirely at ease and...
The last letter I have had from Edgehill was Anne’s of June 20. that informed me that the family had been generally unwell, that Ellen was still ill, and your self too sick to write. I am very anxious to hear from you & hope that this day’s post will inform me you are all well. this day fortnight I propose to leave this place and to be with you Thursday morning the 24th. absence from you...
Your letter of Apr. 19. & mr Randolph’s of Apr. 27. have given me the agreeable information of mr Randolph’s success, & the more agreeable & important information that you are getting well. for the restoration of your stomach my chief dependance is on your own resolution to observe rigorously whatever regimen you find from experience to agree with you: and it will take a long course of this...
I have been expecting by every post to learn from you when I might send on to meet you. I still expect it daily. in the mean time I inclose you 100. Dol. for the expences of yourself, Maria & all your party. mr Randolph would do well to exchange the bills for gold & silver which will be more readily [. . .] on the road. the indisposition I mentioned in my letter by Bowles turned out to be...
Our Milton post not having come in last night, we are without news from you. I suppose he has been delayed by the weather, a severe snow storm having begun yesterday morning & still continuing. the snow is supposed to be now a foot deep, and is still falling with unabated fury. as it is the first, so I hope it will be the last of our severe winter weather. it is so tempestuous that I presume...
I recieved yesterday mr Randolph’s letter of the 23d. giving me the always welcome news of your health. I have not heard from Maria since I have been here. it is a terrible thing that people will not write unless they have materials to make a long letter: when three words would be so acceptable. Mrs. Madison left us two days ago, to commence housekeeping, so that Capt Lewis & myself are like...
Mr Randolph continues well. nothing has happened to throw him back. he rides out now on good days in the carriage. he came down to breakfast with us to-day. but the quantity of blood taken from him occasions him to recover strength slowly. it is now certain that his calculation for departure will be truer than mine. judging by the advance of his strength for the last week, it will take another...
Immediately on the reciept of your last letter, as mrs Madison was and is still in Philadelphia, I wrote to her for the articles you desired, and they may be expected by the stage probably in a few days. I now inclose you an hundred dollars for your expences on the road, and you must consider every thing which yourself or the family will want here as to be furnished by me so that the visit may...
Being apprehensive we have mistaken, by one day, the departure of the horse post from hence, I write this on Thursday instead of Friday. mr Randolph is quite strong enough to begin his journey even now. I think that to-day for the first time I have had no sensation of any remains of my head-ach. we continue our purpose of setting out on Monday, but I foresee a particular circumstance which may...
I send you the inclosed magazine supposing it may furnish you a few moments amusement, as well as to the reading members of your family. Mr. Randolph arrived here Sunday evening in good health and brought me the welcome news, that you were all well. Congress has as yet formed but one of it’s houses; there being no Senate. my heart fails me at the opening such a campaign of bustle & fatigue:...
I have been a month now without hearing from Edgehill, mr Randolph’s letter of May 11. being the last I have recieved. Anne then had the mumps which of course were expected to go thro’ the family, and heightens my anxiety to hear from you. our post is now I believe permanently established at three times a week. the spring here continues sickly & cold, & poor prospects of crops. we had...
I was uneasy at not hearing from you by the last post, that is to say, by the one which arrived Tuesday morning last, the 19th. I thought it certain I should recieve information as to sending a carriage. I take for granted I shall have a letter tomorrow morning; but in the mean time this goes out this evening. we find more difficulty than I had expected in getting a carriage. it seems that all...