You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Randolph, Martha Jefferson
  • Period

    • Jefferson Presidency
  • Correspondent

    • Jefferson, Thomas

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 1

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Randolph, Martha Jefferson" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency" AND Correspondent="Jefferson, Thomas"
Results 51-76 of 76 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 2
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I presume mr Randolph writes to you and informs you he continues well. he has rode twice on horseback; yesterday about 4. miles without feeling it. my fit of yesterday was so mild that I have some hope of missing it to-day. I write this in the morning, but will keep it open till the evening to add the result of the day. we both think we may very safely fix on Monday sennight for our departure,...
I presume mr Randolph informs you himself that he is quite well. indeed I have no doubt he could now very safely undertake the journey; but we continue to fix on Monday next for departure. as to myself altho’ I have no actual head-ach, yet about 9. oclock every morning I have a very quickened pulse come on, a disturbed head, & tender eyes, not amounting to absolute pain. it goes off about...
Being apprehensive we have mistaken, by one day, the departure of the horse post from hence, I write this on Thursday instead of Friday. mr Randolph is quite strong enough to begin his journey even now. I think that to-day for the first time I have had no sensation of any remains of my head-ach. we continue our purpose of setting out on Monday, but I foresee a particular circumstance which may...
We are all well here, my ever dear Martha, but I shall not be able probably to set out tomorrow, but shall on Tuesday. we shall be five days on the road. in the mean time the roads will be getting better, & the weather perhaps milder. but indeed it looks as if this winter would run through the summer. not a bud is swelled here yet, except of the red Maple. kiss our dear children for me, and be...
I am in hopes this evening’s mail will bring me information that you are all well, tho in the mean time this letter will have gone on. my health has been constant since my return here. I inclose a newspaper for mr Randolph, a magazine for yourself, and a piece of poetry for Ellen. tell her she is to consider this as a substitute for a letter and that I debit her account accordingly. I shall...
I have just recieved information from mr Jefferson that my shipwrecked goods are gone on from Richmond to Monticello (3. casks excepted which he supposes plundered) and that they appear to be in good condition. as a knolege of what gets safe & in good condition will dispense with my sending on a duplicate provision, I have directed mr Bacon to open all the packages & report to me their...
As it seems now tolerably probable that the British squadron in our bay have not in contemplation to commit any hostile act, other than the remaining there in defiance & bringing to the vessels which pass in & out, we are making all the arrangements preparatory to the possible state of war, that they may be going on, while we take our usual recess. in the course of three or four days a...
My journey to this place was not as free from accident as usual. I was near losing Castor in the Rapidan, by his lying down in the river, where waste deep, & being so embarrassed by the shafts of the carriage & harness that he was nearly drowned before the servants, jumping into the water, could lift his head out & cut him loose from the carriage. this was followed by the loss of my travelling...
Here we are all well; & my last letters from Edgehill informed me that all were so there except some remains of Influenza hanging on yourself. I shall be happy to hear you are entirely clear of it’s remains. it seems to have gained strength & malignancy in it’s progress over the country. it has been a formidable disease in the Carolinas; but worst of all in Kentucky; fatal however only to old...
I was taken with a tooth-ache about 5. days ago, which brought on a very large & hard swelling of the face, & that produced a fever which left me last night. the swelling has subsided sensibly, but whether it will terminate without suppuration is still uncertain. my hope is that I shall be well enough to recieve my company on New Year’s day. indeed I have never been confined by it to my...
I recieved yesterday yours of the 2d. my fever left me the day I wrote to you, and the swelling abated through the whole face, but still remains in a knot as big as a pigeon’s egg, over the diseased tooth, which has now been suppurating so long that the Doctr. thinks he shall have to extract the tooth (altho’ perfectly sound) to prevent a caries of the bone. a day or two will decide. in the...
The letter to mr Hackley shall go by a government vessel which sails for Cadiz the 10th. of this month. such a one will sail monthly for Falmouth, Brest, Lisbon & Cadiz during the embargo. this will furnish his friends a regular means of writing to him. Mr. Hackley has nothing to apprehend from mr Meade as the successor to mr. Yznardi. Meade’s intrigues against Yznardi, and his indecent...
I wrote to you the last week, but a pressure of business at the time prevented my answering a part of your letter of the 16th. Jan. the regret which you there expressed at the supposed effect of your visit to this place on my ordinary expences, gives me real uneasiness, and has little foundation. your being here with your family scarcely added any thing sensible to the ordinary expences of the...
My latest news from Edgehill was Ellen’s letter of the 1st. inst. which seems to have closed her weekly engagements, as otherwise the 8th. & 15th. would have been here. I think Congress will certainly rise on the 25th. the only question of length is the giving the Executive a power to suspend the embargo in the events of peace or of the orders & decrees being withdrawn. the members seem...
Davy arrived last night with your letter of the 23d. and as he will stay some days, & then return slowly with a lame horse I take advantage of this day’s post to answer it. the recommendations for military appointment came too late. as it was impractical for the Executive to select the best characters for command through all the states, we apportioned the men to be raised and the officers to...
We got in good time to dinner at Montpelier the day I left you, and the next two days being cool, we reached this place a little in the night, having come a little over 100. miles in the two days without inconvenience to ourselves or horses. mr Madison arrived here the next day. mr Gallatin & Rodney are still absent. mr Ogilvie has been here sometime lecturing, to very unequal audiences of...
My last letters from Edgehill mentioned that you had been indisposed but had got the better of it. having no letter from Edgehill by this mail I can only hope you continue well.—in a conversation with you on the subject of Jefferson’s going to Philadelphia you mentioned that mr Randolph thought of declining it, and I do not know whether I inferred rightly, from what you said that a supposed...
I drop this line merely to inform you that it is still doubtful whether I shall be ready to set off tomorrow or not till the next day. but indeed should the weather be as warm as it has been for some days I doubt whether I should venture on the road as I believe it impossible the horses should stand it or even ourselves. this day however is moderate, and if it continues so I shall have the...
I forgot to bring with me the gravy spoons to be converted into Dessert spoons. I must therefore pray you to send them to me. I think you mentioned a spare ladle. two ladles I think are necessary. if there be more it may come. if any body should be coming from your neighborhood to Washington, by the stage , they might be packed in a great mass of waste paper & a light box. Shoemaker or J....
I inclose you a letter for T. B. Randolph containing his appointment as a Cadet. but the lodgings at the Military school at Westpoint being entirely full, he cannot be recieved there till the 1st. of March. indeed he could do nothing there sooner, as their vacation begins with November & ends with February. Genl. Dearborne proposed to me yesterday a new regulation respecting the Cadets. there...
Mr. Bacon delivered your letter & every thing else safely. I had ordered a gross of bottles to be bought: but I will now countermand them. I send on corks by the stage, for I think that water casks should be trusted no longer than necessary. the letter & bundle for Jefferson shall be forwarded. certainly the residue of Buffon ought to be sent on to him to the care of mr Jefferson. when he went...
Yours of the 18th. has been recieved. I recieved a letter lately from mr Bankhead informing me he & Anne were well and agreeing to come and live with us until the population of the hive shall force a swarm or the concourse of clients call for & afford a separate establishment. I am happy that they think of settling ultimately at Poplar forest. it is a fine establishment & good neighborhood. I...
I inclose you a letter from Jefferson which I presume will inform you he is well, and I send you one from Dr. Wistar which will give you satisfaction. be so good as to return it. I had one from Anne 2. or 3. days ago, when all were well. she says they will be with us early in March. I sent you the last week by the post rider your watch, watch key & ring, which I hope got safe to hand. I forgot...
I recieved yesterday your letter of the 5th. & mr Randolph’s of the 6th. and I have this morning sent an extract of the latter to mr Nicholas. I sincerely wish it success, but I am afraid mr Carr has been misinformed of mr Patterson’s views, or, which is as likely, that mr Patterson has changed them. he has certainly concluded to settle on a tract of 5. or 600. acres which he gets from mr...
In the instant of the departure of the post Genl. Dearborne calls on me to know the name of a person for whom I applied to be made a Cadet; and I have forgotten the name, & cannot find it on a review of your letters, altho’ I know it was through you that the application came. pray let me know it by return of post; and I will keep the place open a few days. Genl. Dearborne leaves us in a few...
Your letters of the 17th. and 24th. are both recieved. Beverly T. Randolph called at the hour at which I had rode out, & left your letter of the 17th. Taking for granted he was to stay a day as you mentioned, I wrote an invitation to him the next morning to come and dine with me. but he had already gone on. he called in like manner on his namesake Beverley here, who being out did not see him....