Thomas Jefferson Papers
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To Thomas Jefferson from Albert Gallatin, 29 August 1801

From Albert Gallatin

City of Washington 29 Augt. 1801

Dr Sir

My child continuing very unwell, I sent him with Miss Nicholson about 16 miles out of town, mean to go there this evening, perhaps will take them as far as Frederick town & may not be back till Tuesday—therefore write a few lines to day.

Enclosed you will find the list of Warrants, copy of a late circular to the collectors, application from E. Sproat late inspector to be supervisor of N. West district, and a letter from Mr Newton. On receiving the last I wrote to Mr Wagner to issue a commission to Chisman. Sproat lives not in the proper place & has been, I believe, but an indifferent officer. I have written for information for a proper officer for that district.

Mr Meredith returned about a fortnight ago. From various petty circumstances, I judged it better to let him take his course & not to run the risk of offering him any thing in Philada. He has this day communicated a letter he writes to you, declaring his intention to resign latter end of October taking time to settle this quarter’s accounts, which is proper. Will it not be more gracious, that the offer of the office to Mr Habersham should come direct from you, instead of going through my channel? If you think so, you may write him at once by return of mail without waiting for his asking for it. If you think differently, please to write to me and I will act as you may direct. At all events I will not do nor say any thing till I hear from you.

Nothing new this week. I enclose a letter from Gen. Dearborn whose family situation is distressing. A Mr Tisdall, firm & leading republican from Hartford Connect. says that your answer to New Haven has done much good & that next months election will show that they have gained ground. The Maryld. Election of electors is next Monday week—the prospect favourable but not certain

With sincere respect & attachment Your very obt. Servt.

Albert Gallatin

RC (DLC); at foot of text: “Thomas Jefferson. President of the United States”; endorsed by TJ as received from the Treasury Department on 3 Sep. and so recorded in SJL. Enclosures: (1) “Weekly list of Warrants issued on the Treasurer for the week ending 29th August 1801,” reporting 10 warrants, Nos. 134 to 143, for a total of $62,424.38, the largest being issued to Samuel Meredith for $50,000 for the army; with a balance in the Treasury at the beginning of the week of $3,081,736.45 and that at the close “not yet returned” (MS in DLC; entirely in Gallatin’s hand). (2) Treasury Department circular to customs collectors, 20 Aug., reminding them of the requirement of transmitting their accounts punctually and noting that the president directed him to say that “a rigid adherence to the regulation of rendering each quarterly account, previously to the expiration of the next ensuing quarter, shall, hereafter, be considered as indispensably necessary,” with Gallatin explaining what was to be forwarded to the Treasury, by some collectors on a weekly and others on a monthly basis, and inviting them “to communicate, from time to time, whatever your observations and experience may suggest, in relation to any defects, improvements, or evasions of the revenue laws” (printed copy in DNA: RG 36, LFT, with several blanks filled by clerk, signed by Gallatin, at foot of text: “Benjamin Lincoln Esqr. Collector of Boston”; see Gallatin, Papers description begins Carl E. Prince and Helene E. Fineman, eds., The Papers of Albert Gallatin, microfilm edition in 46 reels, Philadelphia, 1969, and Supplement, Barbara B. Oberg, ed., reels 47–51, Wilmington, Del., 1985 description ends , 5:607–8, for the list of collectors to whom the circular was sent, with the names of those who were requested to submit weekly reports in the first column, and with those who were to submit theirs monthly in the second column). (3) Henry Dearborn to Gallatin, Pittston, Maine, 8 Aug., giving news of his daughter who appeared to be in a state of “fixed madness” (Gallatin, Papers description begins Carl E. Prince and Helene E. Fineman, eds., The Papers of Albert Gallatin, microfilm edition in 46 reels, Philadelphia, 1969, and Supplement, Barbara B. Oberg, ed., reels 47–51, Wilmington, Del., 1985 description ends , 5:525). Other enclosures not found.

Gallatin’s Child who continued very unwell was his second son, Albert Rolaz, about 19 months old. On 14 Aug., Gallatin wrote James Witter Nicholson, his brother-in-law, that after being ill for seven weeks Albert Rolaz was reduced to a skeleton and could neither eat nor walk. Gallatin feared for his life. Hannah Gallatin gave birth to a daughter, Catherine, on 22 Aug. Immediately afterwards, Gallatin took Albert Rolaz, who was slowly recovering, and his aunt Maria Nicholson, Hannah’s sister, to Montgomery County, Maryland (Gallatin, Papers description begins Carl E. Prince and Helene E. Fineman, eds., The Papers of Albert Gallatin, microfilm edition in 46 reels, Philadelphia, 1969, and Supplement, Barbara B. Oberg, ed., reels 47–51, Wilmington, Del., 1985 description ends , 5:534, 569, 650; Raymond Walters, Jr., Albert Gallatin: Jeffersonian Financier and Diplomat [New York, 1957], 140, 218).

I have written for information: on 7 Aug., Gallatin wrote Thomas Worthington, register of the land office at Chillicothe, requesting recommendations for several offices, including supervisor of the new revenue district. Gallatin explained that until Congress provided a salary for the supervisor, the appointee would receive a commission as inspector, along with a $500 salary, a $200 allowance for clerks, and “the usual commission on duties collected & allowance for books & stationary.” Even though he initially would not have the title of supervisor, Gallatin wanted him to act as such and “be entirely independant from the Supervisor in Kentucky & correspond directly with the Treasury Department.” He noted that Samuel Finley, receiver of public monies at Chillicothe, had been strongly recommended, with the suggestion that he could hold both positions. Gallatin observed: “Perhaps I am mistaken; but if the two offices may be blended, may not yours & that also be held together? Can either you or he do your duty in both offices connected; if so will you accept of it? If you think that one office is enough for one man, can you recommend any other person?” (Gallatin, Papers description begins Carl E. Prince and Helene E. Fineman, eds., The Papers of Albert Gallatin, microfilm edition in 46 reels, Philadelphia, 1969, and Supplement, Barbara B. Oberg, ed., reels 47–51, Wilmington, Del., 1985 description ends , 5:520).

Communicated a letter: Samuel Meredith to TJ, 29 Aug.

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