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    • Claiborne, William C. C.
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    • Jefferson Presidency
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    • Jefferson, Thomas

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Documents filtered by: Author="Claiborne, William C. C." AND Period="Jefferson Presidency" AND Correspondent="Jefferson, Thomas"
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By an Act of the late Congress, the District of Palmira, in this State, being discontinued, and all the Waters, Shores and Inlets lying within Tennessee, being annexed (from and after the 30th day of June next) to the District of Massac ’ on the Ohio , it has become an Object of much Importance, to the Merchants & Traders of this State, that a deserving and judicious Citizen should be...
Your friendly Letter of the 13th. of last Month, I had the honor to receive, on the 1st. Instant, accompanied with a Letter from the Secretary of State, enclosing me a Commission, as Governor of the Mississippi Territory.—I acknowledge with Gratitude, my Obligations to you, for this high proof of Confidence and Esteem, and, I trust, that every Act of my public Life, will evince my great...
I am sorry that I have remained thus long from my Post; But it really was not in my power sooner to have left Tennessee;—On tomorrow however, I shall certainly take my departure for the Missisippi Territory:—The Western Waters are uncommonly low, and I anticipate a long Voyage, but the season of the year, is favorable, and if the health of myself, and family should be preserved, my passage...
After a passage of 46 days from Nashville; I reached this Town, on the Morning of the 23rd. Instant;—during the Voyge, I experienced no misfortune; and Mrs. Claiborne ; myself; and family enjoyed good health. The Affairs of this District, are greatly confused; in a Word, Anarchy is (nearly) the order of the day:—The restoration of Good Order; and regular Government will be an arduous Work; and...
I have the honor to enclose you, an address from the House of Representatives of the Mississippi Territory, and the pleasure to add, that the Sentiments it contains, are in unison with the feelings of a great majority of the Citizens of this Territory.— I am persuaded, an opinion generally prevails in this District, that the Liberty, Peace, & safety of our Country, greatly depend upon the...
My appointment to this Government, (& if I am not greatly deceived, my conduct since my arrival,) has been pleasing to a great majority of the Citizens:—But from a variety of causes, some difficulties will attend me, in the progress of my administration.—Already my Predecessor has evidenced a disposition, to rekindle the flame of party, & his most zealous partisans, although few in number, are...
On last evening, I had the honor to receive your much esteemed favor of the 7th. Ultimo, together with its enclosures;—the Letters to the President of the Council, and Speaker of the House of Representatives of the Mississippi Territory, have been carefully delivered, and were received with great pleasure by the Gentlemen, to whom they were addressed.— The Resolutions which the Legislature...
On last evening, I received your Letter of the 3rd of April , enclosing your Answer to an Address, from the House of Representatives of this Territory, and which , I shall, with great pleasure, forward to the Speaker of that Body.— With assurances of my highest respect;—I have the honor to subscribe myself—Your faithful friend, and most obt. Hble. Servant RC ( DLC ); in a clerk’s hand, signed...
I have been honored with the receipt of your Letter of the 25th. Ultimo , together with a Report of a Committee of Congress, which accompanyed it . So far as may depend upon my Agency, no exertions shall be wanting to carry into effect in this Territory, the Militia System adopted by the National Legislature, “and in a manner the best calculated to insure such a degree of military discipline...
In my last Letter , I anticipated the resignation of Mr. Seth Lewis , the Chief Justice of this Territory;—I was yesterday informed by that Gentleman , that his resignation had actually been forwarded. If Judge Jackson of Tennessee (the Gentleman I named to you in my last Letter) should not be offer’ed the Appointment of a Judge for this Territory, or be unwilling to accept, permit me Sir, to...
The State of things in New Orleans continue in uncertainty. The Prefect is yet in that City; but not in the exercise of authority. A Vessel from Philadelphia, laden with military Stores, and destined for Fort Adams is now in the Mississippi;—It is said, the Prefect requested the Spanish Government not to permit this Vessel to pass New-Orleans, & was answered, that the free navigation of the...
I have been honored with the receipt of your Letter of the 24th. of May, and the Communication enclosed therein, I shall, with great pleasure, lay before the House of Representatives of this Territory, at their next meeting.—A free and innocent passage along the Waters running into the Bay of Mexico, will contribute greatly to the convenience and Interest of many of your fellow Citizens, and...
I have only time by this days mail, to acknowledge the Receipt of your agreeable favors of the 17th and 18th of July, and to add, that I will with all possible dispatch, give you all the Information I can acquire, in relation to the Province of Louisiana. I pray you Sir, to receive my sincere congratulations on the success of Mr. Monroe’s mission;—The Island of Orleans and the extensive...
My friend Doctor Lattimore , having it in contemplation to pass thro’ Albermarle, on his way to the Seat of Government, I have taken the liberty to introduce him to your Acquaintance;—You will find the Doctor a well informed, modest man—his political principles are purely republican, and his firmness may be relied upon.— I will refer you to Doctor Lattimore for the State of Affairs in this...
My Letter of the 12th Instant, acknowledged the receipt of your agreeable favours of the 17th & 18th of July;—Since which I have turned my attention, to the several subjects embraced in Queries relative to Louisiana, and I now lay before you, the result of my inquiries and reflections— 1st. What are the best Maps general or particular of the whole or parts of the Province? Copies of them if to...
I persuade myself that my letters of the 12th and 24th of August, have reached you in safety. I have not yet been enabled to procure Romane’s map of Louisiana, and I fear the Geographical sketches which were promised me, by a Gentleman residing at Nachitoches on the Red River will not be forwarded. This Gentleman is a Doctor Sibly, formerly of North Carolina, and a man of good general...
About 20 minutes since, I received a Letter from my friend Docter Sibley, enclosing me a Map of the Country West of the Mississippi, which I hasten to forward to you:—The Doctor’s Letter contains much useful Information, & therefore I have taken the liberty to transmit it for your perusal & must beg you to receive it in confidence.— The Northern Mail is now closing, and the Post-Master allows...
Before my departure from this Post, I cannot deny myself the pleasure of addressing to you a private and inofficial Letter.— Information of the Mission to New-Orleans , with which you honored me, I received on the evening of the 17’th Ultimo, and the measures which I have taken since that period, have been faithfully detailed to you by my Communications to the Department of State.—The...
A few days previous to my departure from Fort Adams, I had the honor to address to you a private letter , which I hope has reached you in safety. Since my arrival in this City, my official communications to the Department of State have informed you of all events of importance, and thro’ that channel I shall endeavour to keep you fully advised of such political occurrences as are worthy of...
Mr. Isaac Briggs and Mr. Robert Williams are now in this City, and propose taking their passage (by Water) for the Seat of Government in two or three Days. I cannot omit so favorable an opportunity to write you an unofficial and private Letter.—The causes which induce these Gentlemen to leave Natchez, they will themselves explain. I do sincerely regret the excuse for their departure, but under...
Mr. Briggs and Mr. Williams of whose arrival in this City, I informed you in my last , have been detained longer than they had calculated on; they will however, sail on tomorrow in a Vessel bound for Philadelphia, but the Captain has promised to land them at Charleston if the wind should admit of it. I think it probable that these gentlemen will reach the seat of Government early in April....
A few Days ago, near 300 Spanish Troops were embarked for Pensacula; about 70 Spanish Soldiers are yet in this City & between 12 & 16 officers; the former it is said will be removed in a short time and many of the latter contemplate resigning and settling in Louisiana. The Liberality of Congress in extending Register to Vessels owned by Citizens of Louisiana, has given great satisfaction, &...
At the particular request of Peter Pedisclaux, a Recorder of Mortgages, and a Notary public in this city I take the liberty to forward to you, the enclosed petition and the documents accompanying it. On my arrival in this city, I found the offices of Mr. Pedisclaux shut, and himself invested with no appointment under the administration of M. Laussat the Colonial Prefect. Mr. Pedisclaux was an...
I had the honor to receive yours of the 18th. of March, covering the complaint of M. Baudin , whose goods were siezed in execution at the suit of M. Labie; and I pray you to accept my thanks for this additional proof of the confidence which you are pleased to repose in me. I have already announced to the Department of State the establishment of a Court for the dispatch of Judicial business in...
I was last evening honored with the receipt of your Letter of the 30th. of March.—It would personally be a source of great satisfaction to me, to see the Marquis de la Fayette a Citizen of Louisiana, and I believe his permanent residence therein , would be a great public Benefit.—I shall hasten to make the enquiries you solicit, and to communicate to you, the Result: My present Impression is,...
Since my last Letter , I have endeavoured to inform myself of such vacant Land which from quality and situation was the most valuable. I have sought information upon this subject, from several old Inhabitants, but more particularly from Don Carlos Trudeau late Surveyor General of Louisiana, a man of some Science, great integrity of Character, and possessing much local knowledge.— Mr. Trudeau...
Since my last letter I have understood, that a half section of vacant land might probably be located adjacent to this City, and immediately bordering on the Canal of Carondelet. This land lies low and is often covered with water, but I learn it might easily be reclaimed, and there can be no question but it will soon become valuable. The public property in New-Orleans is considerable, and would...
By a late mail I received from the Secretary of the Treasury a letter concerning the Bank proposed to be established in this Territory, and find with sincere concern; that he is much dissatisfied with the measure. He questions the authority by which the scheme was sanctioned,—expresses apprehensions that it may defeat a project in contemplation, of establishing a Branch of the United States...
At the particular request of the Superior of the Convent in this city, I have the honor to enclose you a communication from the Ursaline Nuns. These respectable Ladies merit and possess a great share of the public esteem; their conduct is exemplary, and their time is usefully employed in the education of female youth.—During my short residence in this city, I have paid the Nuns very great...
I have this moment understood that Messrs. Girod and Chal , Merchants of this City, have addressed a letter to you, complaining “that I had (to their injury & exclusion) recognized in the Baron of Bastrop, an exclusive right to trade with Citizens at Ouacheta and also with the Indians who might visit that post, which privilege had been heretofore granted to the Baron by the King of Spain”;—The...
My official Letters to the Secretary of State, have advised you, of Mr. Livingston’s exertions to promote a Memorial to Congress, the object of which is to obtain the immediate recognition of Louisiana as a Member State of the Union. Mr. Livingston is supported by Messrs. Evan Jones and Daniel Clark, and there is no doubt but they will be joined by many french Inhabitants.—I have not seen the...
It is with real concern I announce to you, the death of my esteemed friend H. B. Trist. He died this morning of a malignant yellow fever, after an illness of five days. The loss of this Citizen is a public misfortune, and will occasion much private distress:—He was faithful to the trust with which you honored him, and had he lived a few years longer, would have made ample provision for the...
During my late Illness, I had the pleasure to receive your esteemed favours of the 7th., 12th and 17th. of July;—But being then unable to write, I requested my private Secretary Mr. Briggs to inform you of their receipt, and to forward to you, the Names of several Gentlemen as suitable Characters for the Legislative Council.—I regret exceedingly the miscarriage of your Letter to me of the...
A list of the Gentlemen recommended to compose the Legislative Council Benjamin Morgan Dr. John Watkins Dr. Robert Dow William Kenner William Donaldson James Pitot Francis Duplessis & Peter Petit of New-Orleans. James Mather Colonel Bellechasse & Le Breton D’Orgenoy—residing on the Coast between the City and Manshac. Dr. John Sibley of Nachitoches. William Wykoff & Theophilus Collins of...
Having been informed that Doctor John Watkins had declined the appointment of Surgeon to the Garrison of New Orleans, permit me to name to you Doctor Oliver H. Spencer as qualified in the opinion of those who know him to fill that Station. Doctor Spencer is a young man of promising talents: his skill, industry and attention in the practise of medecine and his amiable deportment in private life...
Since my last letter to you, I have greatly recovered my health, and I have the pleasure to add, that Mrs. Claiborne is now pronounced by her Physicians to be out of danger.—The fever continues to prevail here; but within a few days it has assumed a milder shape, and in several instances has yielded to medicine. The mortality during the last month was principally confined to Strangers;—but on...
I have filled up the blank Commissions, which you committed to my Care, with the Name of John Thibaut of New-Orleans, & I now enclose the Bond he has given, and the Oaths he has taken & subscribed , in manner as the Law directs.— Mr. John Thibaut is a Native Frenchman, and was highly recommended to me as a Man of Integrity and Information; He resided four years in the U. States, & for the last...
This City continues the Seat of Disease:—On the 16th. Instant died of the prevailing fever my private Secretary Joseph Briggs, on yesterday Mr. John Gelston late of New-York, and on this Morning Mr. Benjamin West late of Philadelphia.— My own family is heavily afflicted; Mrs. Claiborne continues ill, and her Brother (Mr. Lewis) is expected to die in the course of the Day.—The distress of the...
I have recently experienced the heaviest of Afflictions.—It has pleased Allmighty God to call to the abode of Rest my whole family.—On the evening of the 25th. Instant my only child, a sweet little Daughter under three years of Age, breathed her last, and in the morning ensuing Mrs. Claiborne closed a Life , with the continuance of which my happiness was intimately connected.—Every medical...
By the last Mail, I could only acknowledge the receipt of your esteemed favour of the 30th. August;—But I shall now do myself the pleasure to reply to it more particularly. On receiving the Appointment of Governor of this Territory, I feel sensibly the honor confered, and shall be the more solicitous to deserve a Continuance of your Confidence;—I am however firmly persuaded that the office...
Since my last Letter, I have filled the Blank in the Marshalls commission, with the Name of Francis Joseph Le’Breton Dorgonoy, and administered to him the Oaths of office.—This Gentleman is a Native of Louisiana; an independent Farmer, and possessing (as is stated to me) inflexible Integrity. Mr. Dorgonoy is also an American in sentiment and feeling; he has of late given umbrage to some...
There is not in this Territory, all that political Union, which I could wish; But I verily believe that the Discontents are not extensive, nor do I think them of a serious nature.—The Memorial no doubt, was signed by many Citizens; But I nevertheless do not view that Instrument as a fair expression of the public will.—Twenty persons composed the first meeting; three or four Sketches of a...
I have forwarded you by the Ship Fame bound to Baltimore, a small Box containing a few Fossils &c. collected by a Mr. “Richard King on his excursion to the Hot Springs, on the Ouachita River,” and of which I solicit your Acceptance.— Mr. King in his Letter to me, speaking of the Hot Springs—observes—“These Springs form the most extraordinary Phenomenon in the World. The Water is hot almost to...
Governor Falch is now in this City, and was received by me with respectful attention. On this morning accompanied by my Militia Officers, I waited upon the Marquis of Casa Calvo; visited with him the Cathedral Church, and assisted at high Mass.—This day is the feast of St. Carlos, and with a view of testifying my respect for his Catholic Majesty so long as my Country shall be in Peace with him...
Governor Falch is yet in this City, arranging (as is understood) with the Marquis a plan for improving and strengthening the Garrison at Pensacola. These Gentlemen (I hear) are impressed with an opinion that the U. States will abandon their Claim to West Florida, and that East & West Florida will be given in exchange for the West Bank of the Missisippi;—But this I presume is in conformity to...
A late arrest of a Spanish officer in this City by the Civil authority, has occasioned much agitation here, and excited in a great degree, the displeasure of the Marquis of Casa Calvo, and of Governor Folch. I have not time by this Mail, to furnish the Secretary of State with the particulars of this affair, but I pray you to be assured, that the conduct of the constituted authorities has been...
My Administration here, from the time of my Arrival in Louisiana, to the close of the late provisional Government, has already became an object of some discussion: to this I can have no objection; I wou’d rather court it, were I assur’d, that the Enquiries wou’d be conducted with Candour.—but some publications have appear’d here upon the subject, in which, I do not think Justice has been...
Since the 12th. Ultimo Messrs. Poidrass Morgan and Watkins have been attending in the City with a view of meeting in Council in conformity to my Proclamation. Messrs. Kenner and Wikoff (who from fear of the Fever had avoided the City) appeared a few days since. These five gentlemen are all who of the original Thirteen named as Councillors thought proper to accept. The situation of things here...
I have the Honour to enclose you a copy of my address to the Legislative Council, and of the answer returned thereto. The meeting of the Council has had already a happy effect; the few Intriguers who have laboured to stop the wheels of Government are greatly discouraged, and the well disposed Citizens highly satisfied. The only anxiety I now feel is, that the means I resorted to, to form a...
I have the pleasure to announce the arrival of Judge Hall; he reached this City three days ago; and on this Morning, I delivered him his Commission, and administered the oaths of Office. The death of Colonel Kirbey is really an event I greatly lament; But I persuade myself his vacancy will soon be filled by an able and judicious Judge.—Mr. Prevost is attentive to his duties, and his decisions...