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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Smith, Robert" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency" AND Correspondent="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Correspondent="Smith, Robert"
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When it became necessary for me to name a successor to Mr. Stoddart, as Secretary of the Navy, my attention was naturally first called to those gentlemen whose line of life led them to an intimacy with ship-building & navigation. the place was therefore proposed to your brother, to mr Langdon & to Capt Jones. they have all declined it. it becomes now necessary to find one in some other line....
I recieved yesterday mr Thomas’s favor covering the list of warrants for the week, and your’s of the 7th. inst. I am very glad to learn your opinion on the question of admitting French & English prizes into our ports, & that it coincides with my own. indeed it is the opinion of every member of the administration. I consider that we are free to recieve, or to refuse the prizes of both nations,...
Congress appropriated 20,000 D. to effecting the Marine hospital . the Site purchased of the Commissioners cost between 8. & 9000 Dollars. but it was thought that 4000 D. only of that in cash would be requisite for their purposes & that the balance might be applied to their credit in account of the sum guaranteed by Congress: consequently that there remained 16,000. D. of the appropriation...
Your favors of Aug. 27. 31. 31. are received. the last one requires only to be acknoleged. the commissions , which are the subject of the first, are signed & forwarded herewith. with respect to the Boston she may get ready for departure as soon as possible. we do not consider it as proper to delay either the vessel or mr Livingston. the delay under which the treaty is may possibly be...
I have just recieved from Govr. Drayton a letter [on] the subject of the French prisoners there, with copies of those which had passed between him and the French agent, which I inclose you. in his letter to me is this passage. ‘I should be glad to know in what manner the expences of the said prisoners are to be defrayed: whether by the US. or the French republic. for as they were brought in...
The letters of the 7th. 8th. 11th. & [14]th. inst. from yourself and your chief clerk came to hand the day before yesterday. consequently that of the 7th. must have slept a week by the way somewhere. I now return the warrants for the midshipmen signed. I rejoice at the event of your election. it gives solidity to the Union by gaining a legislative & ensuring an Executive ascendancy to...
Capt Truxton’s idea of a [gradual] relief of our frigates [presents] advantages. in addition to what he [mentions], the frigate going out [might] always carry supplies; the frigate relieved may always be any particular one which may have got damaged & need repairs. it puts it in our power to shift the officers at our will & without offence. [it] might, on the arrival of the one & before the...
Th: Jefferson asks the favor of the Secretary of the Treasury, Secretary at War & Secretary of the Navy to carry into execution the inclosed resolution of the H. of representatives of May 3. 1802. desiring a statement of expenditures from Jan. 1. 1797. by the Quarter Master Genl. the Navy agents, for the Contingencies of the Naval & Military establishments and the Navy contracts for timber &...
Th: Jefferson presents his friendly salutations to the Secretary of the navy and incloses him a letter from mr Page asking a furlough for a son of Genl. Spotswood . if it be within rule it is worth while to oblige the Genl. (tho’ a true federalist) as well as mr Page PrC ( DLC ). Recorded in SJL with notation “furlough for Spotswood.” Enclosure: probably Mann Page to TJ, 9 May 1802, recorded...
I recieved yesterday the inclosed copies of letters from Simpson & Commodore Morris forwarded from your office. the demand of the emperor of Marocco is so palpably against reason and the usage of nations, that it bespeaks either a determination to go to war with us at all events, or that he will always make common cause with any of the Barbary powers who may be at war with us. his having...
I inclose you a letter from a mr Isaac Mansfield as attorney for the representative of James Mugford , who was killed in an action on board a vessel which he commanded whereby, under the then existing regulations, his widow became entitled to a bounty . I inclose it to you because, if entitled by the existing laws, the [inquiries] first come to your office for it’s sanction before it could be...
Your favors of the 16th & 17th were recieved last night; but neither the commissions or Warrants mentioned in the last to be forwarded have come. I suppose they have been put into the post office after the hour and will [be on] by the next post. I recieve by this your opinion & those of the Secretaries of the Treasury & War on our Barbary affairs. I had before asked & received that of mr...
I have just returned from Mr. Madison’s, where I have had conferences with him on the subject of our Barbary affairs & on consideration of the opinions of yourself & the Secretaries of the Treasury & War. there is an entire concurrence of opinion among us in every material point. the amount of these opinions is, and consequently the decision on them as follows. The hundred guncarriages, and...
I had yesterday written & committed to the post office a letter in answer to yours of the 16th. on the measures to be pursued with respect to our Barbary affairs. this was grounded on the supposition that we might still be at peace with Marocco. your’s of the 20th. was recieved yesterday evening, and informs me of the declaration of War by the Emperor of Marocco. it was not very unexpected....
Your’s of the 27th. was recieved yesterday. the host of commissions had come to hand and been signed & sent back by the last post. those now recieved are therefore returned: as are also the instructions to Commodore Morris with the suggestion of a small alteration or two. I doubt too whether it might not be proper to say something on the conditions of peace with Tripoli & Marocco; to wit that...
Your two favors of Aug. 31. are recieved. the printed instructions are signed & accompany this. I presume the instruction as to the procuring gunboats is right, tho’ I can judge here from reason only and not information. we ought to rely also in the discretion of our officers so far as that they will not commit our men in these small vessels to an unequal or even equal fight. we ought above...
We have now authentic information from mr Simpson that the Governor of Tangiers has by letter informed him of the Emperor of Marocco’s permission to him to return for six months. this is a clear enough expression of his object, which is presents, and peace. on these we have time to consider. but this change in the state of things renders it proper that we should change our purpose of sending...
The object of the present is merely to acknolege the reciept of yours of the 14th. and to mention that I have recieved a letter from mr Gallatin disapproving of the first order for the sailing of the John Adams, on general grounds & also on the special ground that the appropriations for that object were exhausted: further that mr Madison will be with me tomorrow, and that I will then take the...
I have had an opportunity of consulting with mr Madison and of considering with his assistance the question whether the John Adams should proceed. I had before been favored with a letter from mr Gallatin which with yours furnished material considerations on the subject. the defect of specific appropriation presented the greatest difficulty: but that seems already incurred by the advance of the...
We have this morning recieved authentic information from mr Simpson that a state of peace is happily restored between us & the emperor of Marocco. information habitually recieved shews there has never been any danger of rupture between us & Tunis or Algiers. in this state of things, and considering the approach of winter, it becomes necessary we should have a general consultation of the heads...
Francis Mitchill of Richmond in Virginia has been recommended for a midshipman’s place by Colo. John Harvie of that place and mr George Divers, gentlemen worthy of all confidence . I saw him myself, & found from his own statement that he had proceeded in geometry as far as the 6. first books of Euclid. William G. Stewart of Philadelphia applies for a place of midshipman. I am personally...
Th: Jefferson asks a consultation with the heads of departments tomorrow at 11. aclock, on the subject of N. Orleans & the Floridas. should we meet later, we may be prevented by the visits usual on the day.   will mr Smith be so good as to send the inclosed over the way to mr Lincoln? RC ( MHi : Levi Lincoln Papers); undated or date clipped; endorsed by Levi Lincoln as 31 Dec. 1802; with...
I have recieved a letter from the Secy. of state informing me that the Dey of Algiers refuses to [accept?] the money offered him in commutation for the naval stores [due] him and consequently it becomes necessary to send the stores immediately. as it is [certainly?] better for the public that the purchase of naval stores should [be in?] the hands of one set of agents, not only to avoid...
I wrote you on the 17th. on the subject of the stores for Algiers, since which your’s of the 12th. is recieved. I thought I had spoken to mr Madison on the day of my departure on the subject of the gun carriages for the emperor of Marocco. I now write to him respecting them. I presume the date of the enlistment of the crews of our frigates in the Mediterranean should decide which of them shall...
I recieved yesterday your’s of the 17th. suggesting the sending into the Mediterranean the Constitution or the Philadelphia to overawe the Barbary powers. our plan of keeping one or two frigates there with 4. schooners was concluded on great & general consideration, on the supposition that war with Tripoli alone would go on. your letter suggests no new fact changing the state of things. I...
I learn from Capt Tingey that the Philadelphia will probably not sail till August, and the frigate at Boston is expected to be still later. the Nautilus we are told is on the point of sailing. on consultation with the heads of department here, I am of opinion, and suggest it for your consideration, that an order of recall to Capt Morris should go by the Nautilus. from his inactivity hitherto,...
I this moment recieve from mr Madison a communication of your letter of the 17th. proposing that Capt Morris shall come home in the Adams whose crew have served their time instead of the New York which has still some time to serve. the reasons are entirely good and I concur with you in the change. Affectionate salutations. PrC ( DLC ); partially dated. Recorded in SJL with notation “Morris.”...
It is suggested to me (indirectly from the person himself) that Jerome Bonaparte is at Baltimore, under the name of Monsr. Dalbarton, with a son of Rewbell, [&] that they mean to ask a passage to France in one of our frigates. if this be the fact, he will have satisfied thereof the minister of his nation, thro’ whom we shall be apprised of it, & relieved from all trouble in deciding on it....
Th: Jefferson salutes mr Smith and incloses him a letter from a mr Nichols of Massachusets desiring to be a midshipman, of whom he knows nothing but what is contained in the letter. health & happiness. PrC ( DLC ). Enclosure: John H. Nichols to TJ, 8 Aug. 1803 (recorded in SJL as received from Charlestown on 15 Aug. with notation “to be Midshipman,” but not found).
I inclose you a letter from mr Simpson to mr Madison shewing very clearly that our plan of having the gun carriages for the Emperor of Marocco made in Europe, cannot take place. to cut short all further delay on this subject, I think we must furnish them from hence. you observe they must be of the very best & fitted for land service. if we have such, really good, tho’ wanting for our own...