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    • Jefferson, Thomas
    • Randolph, Thomas Jefferson

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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Correspondent="Randolph, Thomas Jefferson"
Results 1-10 of 54 sorted by editorial placement
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I hope you are well, it gives me great pleasure to be able to write to you I have been through my latin grammar twice and mamma thinks that I improved in my reading. I am not going to school now but cousin Beverly and my self are going to a latin school in the spring adieu my dear Grand Papa I want to see you very much indeed believe me your affectionate Grandson RC ( ViU ); undated, but TJ...
I am very happy to find that two of you can write . I shall now expect that whenever it is inconvenient for your papa & mama to write, one of you will write on a piece of paper these words ‘all is well’ and send it for me to the post office. I am happy too that miss Ellen can now read so readily. if she will make haste and read through all the books I have given her, and will let me know when...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 3d , my dear Jefferson, and to congratulate you on your writing so good a hand. By the last post I sent you a French Grammar, and within three weeks I shall be able to ask you, “Parlez vous Français, monsieur?” I expect to leave this about the 9th, if unexpected business should not detain me, and then it will depend on the weather and the...
We have been expecting the measles but have escaped it as yet. Virginia has learnt to speak very well. Ellen is learning french. Cornelia sends her love to you I would be very much obliged to you if you would bring me a book of geography adieu Dear Grand Papa your affectionate Grand son RC ( ViU ); undated; endorsed by TJ as received 24 Feb. and so recorded in SJL .
I was at Monticello yesterday and Mr. Dinsmore had almost finished the cornice in the hall and was to set off for Philadelphia to day. they have almost done the canal and the mill house also. I have read Goldsmith’s grecian history Thucidides & I am now reading Goldsmith’s Roman hitory. give my love to Papa and uncle Eppes. adieu Grand Papa your most afectionate Grand son RC (Mrs. Edwin Page...
Your’s of the 28 th ult. came to hand by our last post. I have consulted your father on the subject of your attending mr Godon’s lectures in mineralogy, and we consent to it so long as the Botanical lectures continue. we neither of us consider that branch of science as sufficiently useful to protract your stay in Philadelphia beyond the termination of the Botanical lectures. in what you say...
I recieved your letter of the 5 th about the 20 th . M r Lemaire had sent the Articles which you wrought for before; I have got phials & hair powder; chain I have sent to New New york for, there being none here; corks, I have not been able to get, as yet of that size; I have paid
In the even current of a country life few occurrences arise of sufficient note to become the subject of a letter to a person at a distance. it would be little interesting to such an one to be told of the distressing drought of the months of April & May, that wheat & corn scarcely vegetated and no seeds in the garden came up; that since that we have had good rains but very cold weather, so that...
It may seem odd that while I was involved in so much business at Washington , I could yet find time to write to you sometimes, and that I have not been able to do it in my present situation. but the fact is that letter writing was there my trade. from sunrise to near dinner was to be of course devoted to it, & a letter more or less made little odds. but in our country economy, letter writing...
I recieved by the last post your letter of the 9 th expressing your desire to study half the day in your own room rather than in the school, if mr Gerardin’s consent should be obtained; & I have consulted your father on the subject. we both find ourselves too much uninformed of the regulations of the school to form a proper judgment on this proposition. if it would break through any rule which...