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    • Monroe, James
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The badness of the weather and Mrs. M’s ill health has prevented our calling on you since we saw you. As the people of the county intend to make you their acknowledgments for your services, sometime in the course of the ensuing week , I have thought it might not be improper to give you a view of the manner in which they propose to express them. I forwarded your letters by the post to Richmond...
Your friends have been made uneasy by a report of your indisposition, but flatter themselves it has been remov’d ere this, as they hear it was a periodical complaint you have had before and which was never accompanied with any dangerous symptoms. I have just return’d from Albemarle whither I went lately from the chancery to qualify in the circuit court of the U. States. The Judges were...
I wrote you lately by Judge Wilson whom I accompanied to the circuit court at Charlottesville. I have since been to the chancery which clos’d as to business of consequence on Saturday. Our child who hath been dangerously ill hath so far recover’d as to admit of her removal home. We sit out thither tomorrow, where I shall remain untill the appeals about the 25th. This will be presented to you...
Your favor of the 20th. of June I have received and am happy to hear of your restoration to health. Mrs. Monroe and family are in Albemarle whither I sit out in a day or two. They are well.—The assumption of the state debts is disliked here, and will create great disgust if adopted under any shape whatever. The minds of all are made up on it, and I doubt whether even the immediate removal to...
My last from Richmond in answer to yours of the 20th. of June has no doubt been received. The more I have reflected on the subject, the better satisfied I am of the impolicy of assuming the state debts. The diminishing the necessity for State taxation will undoubtedly leave the national government more at liberty to exercise its powers and encrease the subjects on which it will act, for that...
A few days past your favor of June 11. was presented me by your relation Mr. G. Jefferson expressive of your friendly and benevolent wishes toward that young gentleman. Colo. Lewis is on a visit to Bedford, so that whatever depends on him will remain in suspense, untill his return, which will be in a few days. In the interim he will remain with me, and indeed untill he shall be comfortably...
After the most mature reflection I have at length yielded to my inclinations to suffer my name to be mention’d for a public appointment. If it takes place, unless some unpleasant reflections on probable future events should press on me, it will contribute greatly to my own and the gratification of Mrs. M. as it will place us both with and nearer our friends. But to be candid there is not that...
I wrote you a few days past in great hurry by the Albemarle post which I presume has been received. You have been able to collect from that communication that my services will be offer’d for the Senate, unless upon the information of my friends it shall appear probable they will be rejected. I gave you there a detail of circumstances relative to that business, and can only now add that as far...
Since my appointment I have not before had leasure to acknowledge the receipt of your obliging favor from Monticello. The arrangement of my business in the different courts, and other affairs, has given me full employment and detain’d me so long that it will be difficult to reach Phila. by the day appointed for the meeting of the Congress. This however I shall attempt and for this purpose sit...
I send you the letters mention’d last night, among which you will find two, from Mr. Fitzhugh and Mr. Page each, cover’d by one from the old gentleman his father recommendatory of young Mr. Mortimer. He is extremely anxious to have him admitted into your office and under your care. The young man appears to be amiable in temper and manner, sensible, prudent, and is well esteem’d among his...
I wrote you soon after my arrival here relative to the wishes and pretentions of a Mr. Mortimer, son of Dr. M. of Fredbg., to an appointment in your office. As I understood mine was accompanied with letters from Mr. Fitzhugh and Mr. Page I suppos’d an answer would have been communicated to these gentlemen. Latterly I have received several applications on that subject from the Doctor and his...
This will be presented you by Mr. Yard at present residing in this city, but lately from St. Croix, whither also he proposes shortly to return. Presuming the establishment of consuls will be extended to that Island, and being willing to accept of such appointment, he has requested me to make his pretensions known to you. His connection with Mrs. Monroe’s family has given me the pleasure of his...
Charlottesville, 29 Mch. 1791. When he left for Philadelphia last November he sought to place his brother “in a quiet good family and where he might pursue his studies to the best advantage.” From general opinion of his friends he engaged lodgings for him with James Kerr, the more so because Monroe “had render’d him services, and had a claim to his attention.” But to his astonishment he...
I have been favor’d with 2 letters from you since my arrival with Paine’s pamphlet in one, and should have answer’d them sooner, but knew of your departure Eastward and of course that it would not have been sooner received. By the 25th. we shall be settled in Albemarle upon my plantation, the unfinish’d state of the buildings having prevented the removal there sooner. The appeals and general...
Your favor of the 10th. found me here upon the business mention’d in my last. I left Mrs. M. at Monticello to remain till my return. I have been here near three weeks and shall leave it tomorrow on my way back. We have gone thro’ the business, allotted to each his duty and are to meet again in Fredbg. on the 5th. of Octr. next. A part of our duty was to consolidate (when many were drawn) all...
You will have heard that upon the discussion of G.M.’s merits, the foreign business was postponed untill tomorrow, nothing having been done respecting the Hague. The order of proceeding required that a similar question shod. have been taken respecting that court that had been as to the others. But owing I presume to the friends of the gentn. in nomination for it, being in opposition to the...
I have been requested by Mr. Dawson to make known to you his willingness to accept the office of Director of the Mint, to which bill the President has this day announced his assent. As my opinion of this Gentleman was communicated to you on a former occasion and he is known personally to you, tis not necessary that I should add any further on the subject. With the greatest respect & esteem...
Be so kind as inform me whether in consequence of our conversation respecting the nominations for command of, and inferior appointments in the army, there is any executive calculation on my conduct. An opposition will probably be made to the Commander, but most certainly if there is in the most distant degree, I shall not join in it, especially as tis possible (as it has been hinted by King...
In April 1791. in the district Court of Fredericksburg, in the case of Mitchell against Wallis, in which the law of the State was plead in bar of the debt, the following were the circumstances. Mitchell, a native of Great Britain residing and trading in Virginia, having debts due him to great amount, conveyed them with other property just before the war to the use of his creditors in Great...
I came here a few days past to attend the ct. of appeals, it being an irregular term and formed of Judges of the general court and some of those of the proper ct. of appeals, to take cognizance of those causes in which any of the judges of the latter ct. may be interested. Tis likewise expected a meeting of the gentlemen appointed for the revision of the laws will be obtained and that business...
I believe I mention’d in my last that great part of my time would be occupied in the completion of our report to the Legislature of the revision of the laws. The only act of the Committee at Richmond was to adjourn here which left me the alternative of returning home and bringing Mrs. M. down with me, or abandoning the trust altogether. Mature consideration determined me in favor of the former...
You have before this I presume heard of the death of Colo. Geo. Mason which was about the 8th. of this month of the gout in the stomack. His patriotic virtues thro the revolution will ever be rememberd by the citizens of this country, and his death at the present moment will be sensibly felt by the republican interest. We intended to have rested a day or two with him on our way, and this event...
Yesterday in concert with Mr. Izard to whose wishes I am forced to accomodate I agreed to the postpon’ment of the report upon weights and measures untill the first monday in Decr., that Mr. Ritenhouse might in the mean time make the experiment of the rod. It was moved by Mr. Ellsworth and seconded by Mr. Read to postpone it untill the next session, but withdrawn upon this motion. Mr. Sherman...
My St. Croix friends have mentioned that it might reach you, that a Mr. Durant would be more acceptable there as Mr. Yards successor than any other person. The enclosed letter respects the pretensions of another Gentleman for another place and which I have thought expedient to submit to your inspection. Sincerely I am yr. affectionate friend & servt RC ( DLC ); endorsed by TJ as received 2...
I have just heard it stated here that the suspension of the payments to France was in the first instance by Mr. Short before the commencement of Mr. Morris’s service and without orders from this place and that the latter only conformed to a rule shewn him, implicating strongly that there never had been any direction from this quarter on the subject. This statement was given by Cabot upon an...
Mr. Gunn has mentioned to Major Butler the report that his conduct at New York upon some publick questions was influenc’d by some expectations of a foreign mission. He has called on Hamilton whom he did not see but means to chastise those concerned in the charge. Hamilton informed him at the time it took place that the appointment of Short was at your instance contrary to his wishes, and that...
This will be presented you by Judge Symes of the western territory, with whom I served in the former-Congress and whom I deem a sensible and honest man. He was of service in repelling the attack upon the Missisippi in 1786 by Gardoqui and company. As he is well acquainted with the affairs of that country I have thought it might be useful for you to know him. We arrived here last night, the...
We arrived here on the 25. and set out to morrow for Albemarle. We have had a more comfortable trip than could well have been expected. Mr. Madison informed you from Alexa. of the fate of several elections since which we have heard that Mr. New of Caroline was preferred to Corbin of Middlesex. Heth for the Northumberland district. Walker for Albemarle (this latter only a report). If we should...
I came here a few days past to attend the district court and shall leave this place on the 10th. for the chy. in Richmond which commences on the 12. In Charlottesville in the case of Barrett the verdict and judgment were against you, deducting the interest as you had proposed during the war. He had no proof except that of Colo. Lewis to establish his claim (at the trial). Upon confering with...
I could wish Mr. Beckley might receive [this?] immediately. But if he should not be in town will you be so kind as possess him of it as soon as possible, adverting to the consideration that it requires of him to perform something in Phila. I wrote you a few days past and shall again from Richmd. whither I am just sitting out. Yrs. affectionately RC ( MHi ); torn; addressed: “[…] of State...
I have just replaced myself at home where I hope to enjoy for a while repose. I did not see Mr. Pope at Richmond and of course could not execute the other objects of your commission. I shall however soon be able to communicate with him thro’ some one of the gentlemen who practice in the Louisa Cty. court and will then apprize you of the result. At Richmond I was requested by Mr. Robert Gamble...
My last informed you that I had just received yours of the fifth, as I returned from a circuit of professional duties. It communicated to you likewise what I had to communicate respecting your own commissions in that line. The European war becomes daily as it progresses more interesting to us. I was happy to find Mr. Genet whom I passed on the road between Fredbg. and Richmd. had made a most...
I have been favored with yours of the 4th. and shall observe the instruction respecting the fund in the hands of Mr. Pope by directing its immediate application to Mr. Barrett. In my last I made some observations evincing the propriety and policy of our neutrality in the present European war, but as that sentiment appears to be general, I refer to it now only as a proof that it is likewise...
I came here yesterday upon some business in the office of the Ct. of chancery, and shall return to morrow. I shall see Barrett to day and give him a line to Mr. Pope for the adjustment of his claim. Mr. Lewis and Divers have valued Thenia and children but have not furnished me the statement. They will on my return. I am likewise in your debt for the Encyclopedia. Be so obliging as state in...
On my return from Richmond I was favored with yours of the 14. of July. I should have answered it sooner had I not been prevented by some peculair engagements. At present I should be more full upon some points but that the favor of Mr. Madisons company likewise prevents it. Upon one point I think it necessary to say a few words. You suggest that some indiscretions of Mr. Genet have given an...
I parted from Mr. Madison three days past at my house. He was so kind as shew me your letter to him by Mr. Randolph. The state into which the conduct of an indiscreet man on the one part, and some very wicked men on the other, has thrown us in respect to France fills me with extreme concern. That he should not have implicitly followed your advice in all the affairs of his country is to me...
The fatigue of my late journey and some concerns which require immidiate attention will deprive me of the pleasure of being at Monticello till after the arrival of Mr. Madison which will be on Wednesday—Unless the funeral of his brother should detain him longer, which however is not expected. I send you the Fredbg. paper containing the proceeding there, which terminated in a recommendation to...
I find the establishment of the charge against Mr. G: will depend principally upon what you heard Mr. Dallas say. This latter will deny that he ever said any thing like what the certificate states. Jay and King heard it from Hamilton and Knox, these latter from Mifflin and I am told that there is a difference between those Gentlemen and Mifflin, and likewise between him and Dallas as to what...
The avidity with which I knew you sought retirement and peace, undisturbed by political occurrences, with the further consideration that no event of any importance had taken place since you left us, prevented my trespassing on you sooner. I am perfectly satisfied you will find in that retirement a contentment and tranquility not to be hoped for in publick life. And yours will be the greater,...
Mr. Madisons propositions are yet depending and their fate incertain. The probability is they will pass in the H. of R. and be rejected in the Senate. The steady zeal with which any thing like a systematic operation on the British commerce, or indeed any branch of her interest is opposed, you have long witnessed and can of course readily conceive upon the present occasion. The opposition as...
Your favor of the 11th. reached me yesterday. We were mortified to find that our letters had not reached you, but hope the obstacle at Richmond is removed before this. As Mr. M. has written you I shall say nothing at present upon the subject of affairs here. I shall only commence with the inclosures of your correspondence with Hammond which after perusal by your family and any others whom you...
The embargo passed two days since. […] of some moment in the character […] […]ber of this city was discovered […] had opposed the embargo on fr[iday an]d on monday introduced the proposition himself. It contained a proviso which implied a right that those vessels which had already obtained clearances should be exempt from the operation—but this was amended in the Senate . A vessel of his was...
A committee of the H. of R. sits daily to provide funds for equiping the fleet and other measures connected with the exigency of the times. They have finally I believe agreed on nothing as yet, tho the fiscal party are for excises on tea &ca. The citizen party are for a land-tax, but seem backward on the subject in every view; regret that an occasion has been made for any great increase; this...
Yours of April 24th. reached me yesterday. Since my last the proposition of Mr. Clarke for prohibiting the importation of British goods untill the posts shall be surrendered and compensation made for the depredation on our trade, was rejected in the Senate. Upon the question the first section which determined the fate of the bill, Jackson and Bradley withdraw which left us 11. only against...
The session begins to draw to a close. The 3d. of June is agreed on by both houses as the day on which it shall end, and I believe the agreement will be executed. The inclosed paper will shew you the state of things with Engld. This incursion into our country has no pretext to be calld or considered otherwise than an actual invasion, and as such presume it will be treated by the President...
Early yesterday morning and immediately after my last was written I was called on by Mr. R. to answer the question “whether I would accept the legation to France?” The proposition as you will readily conceive surprised me, for I really thought I was among the last men to whom it would be made, and so observed. He said the President was resolved to send a republican character to that nation;...
Since my appointment I have been extremely occupied in a variety of respects. I had likewise flattered myself with the hope I should see you before my departure till within a day or two past—but of this I now begin to despair. I shall sail from Bal: for which place I sit out in 4. days hence. Tis possible the vessel may not be ready altho I am advised she is. I feel extremely anxious upon the...
The urgent pressure of the Executive for my immediate departure has deprived me of the pleasure of seeing you before I sailed. I sincerely regret this for many reasons but we cannot controul impossibilities. Will you forward me a cypher, and letters for your friends remaining in Paris to the care of Mr. R. as soon as possible. They may probably reach Paris as soon as I shall. I beg you to add...
I have been here rather more than a month and so much engaged with the duties which devolved on me immediately that I have not yet been able [to] send a single private letter to America. It happened that I took my station a few days after Robertspierre had left his in the Convention, by means of the guillitin, so that every thing was in commotion, as was natural upon such an event; but it was...
Of the above hasty view I have sent a copy to one or two other friends. Since it was written the committee have reported a plan of government as suggested of 2. branches, the one to be called a council of 500. consisting of so many members, the other of 250. called the council of antients. The age of the 1st. to be 30. and of the 2d. 40. They are to be chosen each for 2. years but to be...