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    • Jefferson, Thomas
    • Adams, Abigail Smith

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Had you been no other than the private inhabitant of Monticelo, I should e’er this time, have addrest you with that Sympathy which a recent even has awakened in my Bosom, but reasons of various kinds withheld my pen, untill the powerfull feelings of my Heart, burst through the restraints, and call’d upon me to shed the tear of sorrow over the departed remains of your beloved and deserving...
The affectionate sentiments which you have had the goodness to express in your letter of May 20. towards my dear departed daughter, have awakened in me sensibilities natural to the occasion, & recalled your kindnesses to her which I shall ever remember with gratitude & friendship. I can assure you with truth they had made an indelible impression on her mind, and that, to the last, on our...
your Letter of June 13th came duly to hand; if it had contained no other Sentiments and opinions than those which my Letter of condolence could have excited, and which are expressed in the first page of your reply,. our correspondence would have terminated here: but you have been pleased to enter upon some Subjects which call for a reply: and as you observe that you have wished for an...
your Letter of June 13th came duly to hand; if it had contained no other sentiments and opinions than those which my Letter of condolence could have excited, and which are expressed in the first page of your reply, our correspondence would have terminated here: but you have been pleased to enter upon some Subjects which call for a reply: and as you observe that you have wished for an...
Your favor of the 1st. inst. was duly recieved, and I would not again have intruded on you but to rectify certain facts which seem not to have been presented to you under their true aspect. My charities to Callendar are considered as rewards for his calumnies. as early, I think, as 1796, I was told in Philadelphia that Callendar, the author of the Political progress of Britain, was in that...
Your favor of the 1st. inst. was duly recieved, and I would not again have intruded on you but to rectify certain facts which seem not to have been presented to you under their true aspect. my charities to Callender are considered as rewards for his calumnies. as early, I think, as 1796. I was told in Philadelphia that Callender, the author of the Political progress of Britain, was in that...
Your Letter of July 22d. was by some mistake in the post office at Boston sent back as far as Newyork, so that it did not reach me untill the Eleventh of this Month. Candour requires of me a reply. Your statment respecting Callender, and your motives for liberating him wear a different aspect as explaind by you, from the impression which it had made; not only upon my mind, but upon the minds...
your Letter of July 22d was by some mistake in the post office at Boston sent back as far as Newyork, so that it did not reach me untill the eleventh of this Month. Candour requires of me a reply. your statement respecting Callender, (who was the wretch referd to) and your motives for liberating him, wear a different aspect as explaind by you, from the impression which they had made, not only...
Your Letter of July 22d was by some mistake in the post office at Boston sent back as far as New York, so that it did not reach me untill the Eleventh of this Month. Candour requires of me a reply. Your statement suspecting Callender (who was the wretch referd to) and your motives for liberating him, wear a different aspect as explained by you, from the impression which they had made, not only...
Your letter, Madam, of the 18th. of Aug. has been some days recieved, but a press of business has prevented the acknolegement of it: perhaps indeed I may have already trespassed too far on your attention. With those who wish to think amiss of me, I have learnt to be perfectly indifferent: but where I know a mind to be ingenuous, & to need only truth to set it to rights, I cannot be as passive....
Your letter, Madam, of the 18th. of Aug. has been some days recieve’d, but a press of business has prevented the acknolegement of it. perhaps indeed I may have already trespassed too far on your attention. with those who wish to think amiss of me, I have learnt to be perfectly indifferent: but where I know a mind to be ingenuous, & to need only truth to set it to rights, I cannot be as...
Sickness for three weeks past, has prevented my acknowledging the receipt of your Letter of Septr. 11th. when I first addrest you, I little thought of entering into a correspondence with you upon Subjects of a political nature. I will not regret it, as it has led to some elucidations and brought on some explanations, which place in a more favorable light, occurrences which had wounded me....
Sickness for three weeks past, has prevented my acknowledging the receipt of your Letter of Septr. the 11th. When I first addrest you, I little thought of entering into a correspondence with you upon political topickes. I will not however regret it. since it has led to some Ilucidations and brought on some explanations, which place in a more favourable light occurrences which had wounded me....
Th: Jefferson requests the favour of Mr. & Mrs. Adams. to dine with him on Saturday the 4th. Jany. at half after three. The favour of an answer is asked. MHi : Adams Papers.
Never mind it, my dear Sir, if I write four Letters to your one: your one is worth more than my four. It is true that I can Say and have Said nothing new on the Subject of Government. Yet I did Say in my Defence and in my Discourses on Davila, though in an uncouth Style, what was new to Lock, to Harrington, to Milton, to Hume, to Montesquieu to Roauseau, to Turgot, Condorcet, to Rochefaucault,...
A kind note at the foot of mr Adams’s letter of July 15. reminds me of the duty of saluting you with friendship and respect; a duty long suspended by the unremitting labors of public engagement, and which ought to have been sooner revived, since I am become proprietor of my own time. and yet so it is, that in no course of life have I been ever more closely pressed by business than in the...
your kind and Friendly Letter found me in great affliction for the loss of my dear, and only daughter, mrs Smith She had been with me only three weeks having undertaken a journey from the state of Nyork, desirious once more to see her parents, and to close her days under the paternal roof she was accompanied by her son and daughter. who made every exertion to get her here, and gratify what...
The fit of recollection came upon both of Us, So nearly at the same time that I may, Sometime or other, begin to think there is Some thing in Priestleys and Hartleys vibrations. The day before Yesterday I Sent to the Post office a letter to you and last night I received your kind favour of the 10 th . The question before the human race is, Whether the God of nature Shall govern the World by...
I know not what to Say of your Letter of the 11 th of Jan. but that it is one of the most consolatory, I ever received. To trace the Commence me nt of the Reformation I Suspect We must go farther back than Borgia , or even than Huss or Wickliff , and I want the Acta Sanctorum to assist me in this Research. That Stupendous Monument of human Hypocricy and Fanaticism the Church of St. Peter
My good Husband has call’d upon me for Some Letters, written to me by my Son, when he was last in Paris, in 1815 in which he gives me a particular account of the Family of Count de Tracy and of the circumstances which introduced him to their acquaintance. Beleiving that it will give you pleasure to become acquainted with this happy Domestic Circle, I readily embrace this opportunity of...
My good Husband has call’d upon me for Some Letters, written to me by my Son , when he was last in paris , in 1815 in which he gives me a particular account of the Family of Count de Tracy and of the circumstances which introduced him to their acquaintance. Beleiving that it will give you pleasure to become acquainted with this happy Domestic circle , I readily embrace this opportunity of...
I owe you, dear Madam, a thousand thanks for the letters communicated in your favor of Dec. 15. and now returned. they give me more information than I possessed before of the family of mr Tracy. but what is infinitely interesting is the scene of the exchange of Louis XVIII. for Bonaparte. what lessons of wisdom mr Adams must have read in that short space of time! more than fall to the lot of...
I owe you, dear Madam, a thousand thanks for the letters communicated in your favor of Dec. 15. and now returned. they give me more information than I possessed before of the family of mr Tracy . but what is infinitely interesting is the scene of the exchange of Louis XVIII . for Bonaparte . what lessons of wisdom mr Adams must have read in that short space of time! more than fall to the lot...
What right have I to be one of your tormentors? and amongst the numerous applicants for introductory Letters? Why I will plead, old acquaintance, old Friendship and your well known Benevolence—but to the Subject of my present address. Mr Theodore Lyman, who possesses an ardent thirst for Literature, and whose Father, is one of our most respectable Characters for probity, honour, & wealth, this...
what right have I to be one of your tormentors? and amongst the numerous applicants for introductory Letters? why I will plead, old acquaintance, old Friendship and your well known Benevolence—   but to the Subject of my present address.    Mr Theodore Lyman , who possesses an ardent thirst for Literature, and whose Father , is one of our most respectable Characters for probity, honour, &...
Your letters, dear Madam, are always welcome, and your requests are commands to me. I only regret that I can do so little towards obeying them. but eight and twenty years since I left France would, in the ordinary course of mortality, have swept off seven eighths of my acquaintances, and when to this lapse of time are added the knife of the Guillotine & scythe of constant and sanguinary wars,...
Your letters, dear Madam, are always welcome, and your requests are commands to me. I only regret that I can do so little towards obeying them. but eight and twenty years since I left France would, in the ordinary course of mortality, have swept off seven eighths of my acquaintances, and when to this lapse of time are added the knife of the Guillotine & scythe of constant and sanguinary wars,...