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    • Monroe, James
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Documents filtered by: Author="Monroe, James" AND Period="Washington Presidency" AND Correspondent="Jefferson, Thomas"
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Having written you very fully three days since I have nothing to add at present to the details then given except that in an unexpected rencounter the other day the French have lost 3. ships and by the shameful misconduct of the officers commanding them or some of them. They have in consequence dismissed the Comy. of Marine which I think converts the loss of the ships into a signal victory, in...
My St. Croix friends have mentioned that it might reach you, that a Mr. Durant would be more acceptable there as Mr. Yards successor than any other person. The enclosed letter respects the pretensions of another Gentleman for another place and which I have thought expedient to submit to your inspection. Sincerely I am yr. affectionate friend & servt RC ( DLC ); endorsed by TJ as received 2...
I have just heard it stated here that the suspension of the payments to France was in the first instance by Mr. Short before the commencement of Mr. Morris’s service and without orders from this place and that the latter only conformed to a rule shewn him, implicating strongly that there never had been any direction from this quarter on the subject. This statement was given by Cabot upon an...
Your favor of the 11th. reached me yesterday. We were mortified to find that our letters had not reached you, but hope the obstacle at Richmond is removed before this. As Mr. M. has written you I shall say nothing at present upon the subject of affairs here. I shall only commence with the inclosures of your correspondence with Hammond which after perusal by your family and any others whom you...
Be so kind as inform me whether in consequence of our conversation respecting the nominations for command of, and inferior appointments in the army, there is any executive calculation on my conduct. An opposition will probably be made to the Commander, but most certainly if there is in the most distant degree, I shall not join in it, especially as tis possible (as it has been hinted by King...
The embargo passed two days since. […] of some moment in the character […] […]ber of this city was discovered […] had opposed the embargo on fr[iday an]d on monday introduced the proposition himself. It contained a proviso which implied a right that those vessels which had already obtained clearances should be exempt from the operation—but this was amended in the Senate . A vessel of his was...
I wrote you lately by Judge Wilson whom I accompanied to the circuit court at Charlottesville. I have since been to the chancery which clos’d as to business of consequence on Saturday. Our child who hath been dangerously ill hath so far recover’d as to admit of her removal home. We sit out thither tomorrow, where I shall remain untill the appeals about the 25th. This will be presented to you...
On my return from Richmond I was favored with yours of the 14. of July. I should have answered it sooner had I not been prevented by some peculair engagements. At present I should be more full upon some points but that the favor of Mr. Madisons company likewise prevents it. Upon one point I think it necessary to say a few words. You suggest that some indiscretions of Mr. Genet have given an...
You will have heard that upon the discussion of G.M.’s merits, the foreign business was postponed untill tomorrow, nothing having been done respecting the Hague. The order of proceeding required that a similar question shod. have been taken respecting that court that had been as to the others. But owing I presume to the friends of the gentn. in nomination for it, being in opposition to the...
After the most mature reflection I have at length yielded to my inclinations to suffer my name to be mention’d for a public appointment. If it takes place, unless some unpleasant reflections on probable future events should press on me, it will contribute greatly to my own and the gratification of Mrs. M. as it will place us both with and nearer our friends. But to be candid there is not that...
Since my appointment I have been extremely occupied in a variety of respects. I had likewise flattered myself with the hope I should see you before my departure till within a day or two past—but of this I now begin to despair. I shall sail from Bal: for which place I sit out in 4. days hence. Tis possible the vessel may not be ready altho I am advised she is. I feel extremely anxious upon the...
Your favor of the 20th. of June I have received and am happy to hear of your restoration to health. Mrs. Monroe and family are in Albemarle whither I sit out in a day or two. They are well.—The assumption of the state debts is disliked here, and will create great disgust if adopted under any shape whatever. The minds of all are made up on it, and I doubt whether even the immediate removal to...
I wrote you soon after my arrival here relative to the wishes and pretentions of a Mr. Mortimer, son of Dr. M. of Fredbg., to an appointment in your office. As I understood mine was accompanied with letters from Mr. Fitzhugh and Mr. Page I suppos’d an answer would have been communicated to these gentlemen. Latterly I have received several applications on that subject from the Doctor and his...
The urgent pressure of the Executive for my immediate departure has deprived me of the pleasure of seeing you before I sailed. I sincerely regret this for many reasons but we cannot controul impossibilities. Will you forward me a cypher, and letters for your friends remaining in Paris to the care of Mr. R. as soon as possible. They may probably reach Paris as soon as I shall. I beg you to add...
I could wish Mr. Beckley might receive [this?] immediately. But if he should not be in town will you be so kind as possess him of it as soon as possible, adverting to the consideration that it requires of him to perform something in Phila. I wrote you a few days past and shall again from Richmd. whither I am just sitting out. Yrs. affectionately RC ( MHi ); torn; addressed: “[…] of State...
Your friends have been made uneasy by a report of your indisposition, but flatter themselves it has been remov’d ere this, as they hear it was a periodical complaint you have had before and which was never accompanied with any dangerous symptoms. I have just return’d from Albemarle whither I went lately from the chancery to qualify in the circuit court of the U. States. The Judges were...
Mr. Gunn has mentioned to Major Butler the report that his conduct at New York upon some publick questions was influenc’d by some expectations of a foreign mission. He has called on Hamilton whom he did not see but means to chastise those concerned in the charge. Hamilton informed him at the time it took place that the appointment of Short was at your instance contrary to his wishes, and that...
This will be presented you by Mr. Yard at present residing in this city, but lately from St. Croix, whither also he proposes shortly to return. Presuming the establishment of consuls will be extended to that Island, and being willing to accept of such appointment, he has requested me to make his pretensions known to you. His connection with Mrs. Monroe’s family has given me the pleasure of his...
I have been favor’d with 2 letters from you since my arrival with Paine’s pamphlet in one, and should have answer’d them sooner, but knew of your departure Eastward and of course that it would not have been sooner received. By the 25th. we shall be settled in Albemarle upon my plantation, the unfinish’d state of the buildings having prevented the removal there sooner. The appeals and general...
I send you the letters mention’d last night, among which you will find two, from Mr. Fitzhugh and Mr. Page each, cover’d by one from the old gentleman his father recommendatory of young Mr. Mortimer. He is extremely anxious to have him admitted into your office and under your care. The young man appears to be amiable in temper and manner, sensible, prudent, and is well esteem’d among his...
You have before this I presume heard of the death of Colo. Geo. Mason which was about the 8th. of this month of the gout in the stomack. His patriotic virtues thro the revolution will ever be rememberd by the citizens of this country, and his death at the present moment will be sensibly felt by the republican interest. We intended to have rested a day or two with him on our way, and this event...
Yesterday in concert with Mr. Izard to whose wishes I am forced to accomodate I agreed to the postpon’ment of the report upon weights and measures untill the first monday in Decr., that Mr. Ritenhouse might in the mean time make the experiment of the rod. It was moved by Mr. Ellsworth and seconded by Mr. Read to postpone it untill the next session, but withdrawn upon this motion. Mr. Sherman...
Charlottesville, 29 Mch. 1791. When he left for Philadelphia last November he sought to place his brother “in a quiet good family and where he might pursue his studies to the best advantage.” From general opinion of his friends he engaged lodgings for him with James Kerr, the more so because Monroe “had render’d him services, and had a claim to his attention.” But to his astonishment he...
I find the establishment of the charge against Mr. G: will depend principally upon what you heard Mr. Dallas say. This latter will deny that he ever said any thing like what the certificate states. Jay and King heard it from Hamilton and Knox, these latter from Mifflin and I am told that there is a difference between those Gentlemen and Mifflin, and likewise between him and Dallas as to what...
Early yesterday morning and immediately after my last was written I was called on by Mr. R. to answer the question “whether I would accept the legation to France?” The proposition as you will readily conceive surprised me, for I really thought I was among the last men to whom it would be made, and so observed. He said the President was resolved to send a republican character to that nation;...
A committee of the H. of R. sits daily to provide funds for equiping the fleet and other measures connected with the exigency of the times. They have finally I believe agreed on nothing as yet, tho the fiscal party are for excises on tea &ca. The citizen party are for a land-tax, but seem backward on the subject in every view; regret that an occasion has been made for any great increase; this...
I have been requested by Mr. Dawson to make known to you his willingness to accept the office of Director of the Mint, to which bill the President has this day announced his assent. As my opinion of this Gentleman was communicated to you on a former occasion and he is known personally to you, tis not necessary that I should add any further on the subject. With the greatest respect & esteem...
Since my appointment I have not before had leasure to acknowledge the receipt of your obliging favor from Monticello. The arrangement of my business in the different courts, and other affairs, has given me full employment and detain’d me so long that it will be difficult to reach Phila. by the day appointed for the meeting of the Congress. This however I shall attempt and for this purpose sit...
The badness of the weather and Mrs. M’s ill health has prevented our calling on you since we saw you. As the people of the county intend to make you their acknowledgments for your services, sometime in the course of the ensuing week , I have thought it might not be improper to give you a view of the manner in which they propose to express them. I forwarded your letters by the post to Richmond...
A few days past your favor of June 11. was presented me by your relation Mr. G. Jefferson expressive of your friendly and benevolent wishes toward that young gentleman. Colo. Lewis is on a visit to Bedford, so that whatever depends on him will remain in suspense, untill his return, which will be in a few days. In the interim he will remain with me, and indeed untill he shall be comfortably...