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    • Monroe, James
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    • Washington Presidency
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    • Jefferson, Thomas

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Documents filtered by: Author="Monroe, James" AND Period="Washington Presidency" AND Correspondent="Jefferson, Thomas"
Results 11-20 of 53 sorted by relevance
Since my appointment I have been extremely occupied in a variety of respects. I had likewise flattered myself with the hope I should see you before my departure till within a day or two past—but of this I now begin to despair. I shall sail from Bal: for which place I sit out in 4. days hence. Tis possible the vessel may not be ready altho I am advised she is. I feel extremely anxious upon the...
Your favor of the 20th. of June I have received and am happy to hear of your restoration to health. Mrs. Monroe and family are in Albemarle whither I sit out in a day or two. They are well.—The assumption of the state debts is disliked here, and will create great disgust if adopted under any shape whatever. The minds of all are made up on it, and I doubt whether even the immediate removal to...
I wrote you soon after my arrival here relative to the wishes and pretentions of a Mr. Mortimer, son of Dr. M. of Fredbg., to an appointment in your office. As I understood mine was accompanied with letters from Mr. Fitzhugh and Mr. Page I suppos’d an answer would have been communicated to these gentlemen. Latterly I have received several applications on that subject from the Doctor and his...
The urgent pressure of the Executive for my immediate departure has deprived me of the pleasure of seeing you before I sailed. I sincerely regret this for many reasons but we cannot controul impossibilities. Will you forward me a cypher, and letters for your friends remaining in Paris to the care of Mr. R. as soon as possible. They may probably reach Paris as soon as I shall. I beg you to add...
I could wish Mr. Beckley might receive [this?] immediately. But if he should not be in town will you be so kind as possess him of it as soon as possible, adverting to the consideration that it requires of him to perform something in Phila. I wrote you a few days past and shall again from Richmd. whither I am just sitting out. Yrs. affectionately RC ( MHi ); torn; addressed: “[…] of State...
Your friends have been made uneasy by a report of your indisposition, but flatter themselves it has been remov’d ere this, as they hear it was a periodical complaint you have had before and which was never accompanied with any dangerous symptoms. I have just return’d from Albemarle whither I went lately from the chancery to qualify in the circuit court of the U. States. The Judges were...
Mr. Gunn has mentioned to Major Butler the report that his conduct at New York upon some publick questions was influenc’d by some expectations of a foreign mission. He has called on Hamilton whom he did not see but means to chastise those concerned in the charge. Hamilton informed him at the time it took place that the appointment of Short was at your instance contrary to his wishes, and that...
This will be presented you by Mr. Yard at present residing in this city, but lately from St. Croix, whither also he proposes shortly to return. Presuming the establishment of consuls will be extended to that Island, and being willing to accept of such appointment, he has requested me to make his pretensions known to you. His connection with Mrs. Monroe’s family has given me the pleasure of his...
I have been favor’d with 2 letters from you since my arrival with Paine’s pamphlet in one, and should have answer’d them sooner, but knew of your departure Eastward and of course that it would not have been sooner received. By the 25th. we shall be settled in Albemarle upon my plantation, the unfinish’d state of the buildings having prevented the removal there sooner. The appeals and general...
I send you the letters mention’d last night, among which you will find two, from Mr. Fitzhugh and Mr. Page each, cover’d by one from the old gentleman his father recommendatory of young Mr. Mortimer. He is extremely anxious to have him admitted into your office and under your care. The young man appears to be amiable in temper and manner, sensible, prudent, and is well esteem’d among his...