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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Randolph, Thomas Mann
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    • Jefferson Presidency
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    • Jefferson, Thomas

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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Randolph, Thomas Mann" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency" AND Correspondent="Jefferson, Thomas"
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Every thing from Europe for some time past being interesting, I have sent you some of the Public Advertisers, which at times seems to be the best paper we have for foreign intelligence as well as sound domestic discussions. at present we have nothing from Europe. the two houses have assembled earlier than usual. there was a quorum of the H. of R. here on Saturday. Macon is sick and absent....
By yesterday’s mail I learn that it would be the desire of many of the good citizens of our county to meet me on the road on my return home, as a manifestation of their good will. but it is quite impossible for me to ascertain the day on which I shall leave this. the accumulated business at the close of a session will prevent my making any preparation for my departure till after the 4th. of...
The post of last night brings us agreeable information from New Orleans & Natchez. Genl. Wilkinson arrived at N. Orleans from Mobille Nov. 25. settled immediately with Laussat all the circumstances of the delivery, & proceeded next day to Fort Adams, where he would arrive on the 30th. & expect to meet Claiborne there ready for embarcation. on the 29th. Laussat demanded possession of the...
I have been so closely engaged since I came here that I have not had time to write any letter which could be postponed. this place is unusually healthy. some persons from Alexandria have been taken with the fever here & died, without communicating it: so that we consider our rural situation as perfectly exempt from the danger. it seems to get worse in Alexandria, Philadelphia & New York, & so...
I now inclose you Govr. Drayton’s answer to Doctr. Tucker by which you will percieve that there is no prospect of getting your negroes through the state of S.C. in the present state of their laws; and as to alterations to be made in these, they are too precarious to affect your plans in the least. you will have to go therefore either through Tennissee or by water. it is said that the former...
Believing a letter will still find you at home, I drop you a line to give you the Western news. a letter from Wilkerson of Nov. 30. from N. Orleans informs us he is there & his troops coming down the red river to him; & that he is preparing to cover that place from Burr. this letter comes by water & is therefore here before those we are to infer are on the road informing us of his having...
I inclose a letter for Colo. C. L. Lewis of Buckisland, which, from it’s contents, will justify my asking you to send it by express & without delay. it is left open for your perusal, and you will be so good as to stick a wafer in it. immediately on recieving mr Speer’s directions, I remitted 50. D. to mr Moore of Baltimore for him. I percieve that to make up the 43½ D. you must have put in 12....
Your letter recieved this morning has given me a pang under which I am overwhelmed. I take up my pen to express some of my thoughts, but thousands will remain which are inexpressible. I had for some days percieved in you a gloom which gave me uneasiness. I knew there was a difference between mr Eppes & yourself, but had no idea it was as deep seated as your letter shews it to be. I never knew...
A gentleman here has occasion for a particular purpose to consult the Preliminary discourse written by Dalembert to the antient encyclopedia, which was in fact a developement of Bacon’s Arbor scientiae . it is in one of the volumes (the 1st. I believe) of the Melanges de literature in 5. vols. 12. mo. which you will find in the press on the right side of the cherry sash door in my cabinet. I...
I am made happy by the regular accounts of the health of the inhabitants of Edgehill. here there has been an uncommon degree of sickness; ascribed of course to the mild winter, tho’ we cannot see why. The H. of R. have now been a week debating the judiciary law, and scarcely seem to be yet on the threshold of it. I begin to apprehend a long session: however I believe all material matters...