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    • Jefferson, George
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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Jefferson, George" AND Correspondent="Jefferson, Thomas"
Results 451-500 of 568 sorted by date (ascending)
Until the receipt of your favor of the 2d. I had entirely forgotten the case of St. George wine at Gordon’s.—On his informing me that you were to have one, I requested him to send it to our house, that it might certainly be recollected: and his promising to do so, I suppose caused me to cease to charge my memory with it, and thus it was forgotten altogether.—It shall now be forwarded by the...
My stock of brown sugar falling short I must pray you to send me a cask of about 100. ℔ of the best & whitest muscovado, by the first boat. but it must be double cased & strongly. the last box of wine which came up, was delivered open, and with 13. bottles of the wine used. most of the bottles remained with their corks & shewed they had been drawn. the depredations of the watermen add about...
I am very sorry that I have not been able to meet with an opportunity of forwarding the 100 ℔s of muscovado sugar.—it has been held in readiness ever since the receipt of your letter. As the boats have now to land at the broken part of the canal, which is about a mile above the basin, I apprehended I might not have the Same chance of meeting with opportunities as formerly, and therefore...
Yours of the 4th. inst. is just now recd. stating a balance of 74.11 D in my favor. that I presume was soon called for by my two draughts in favor of our sheriffs.—I have now to request you to procure & send me, by the earliest vessel, a thousand bushels of coal of the best quality for the grate.   mr. McCraw writes me on the subject of his prosecutions for mr Mazzei that he thinks he may...
We have received your favor of the 6th. Inst. inclosing $250 which shall be appropriated as you direct. the Coal shall be sent with all possible dispatch—Mr. Le Telier informs us that he will be happy to execute any work you may favor him with; we understand from a Silversmith for whom he has done a good deal of work that he has given general satisfaction With respect We are Sir Your ob...
We hand you inclosed bill of Loading for 1200 bushels Coal by the Schr. Brothers Capn. S: Travers. Mr. Nicholson informs us he was obliged to ship that quantity, as he could not procure a smaller vessel and the Capn. refused to go unless he had a full load—we likewise send inclosed Mr Saml: McCraw’s receipt for the fifty dollars paid him—With respect we are Sir Your ob: Servts: MHi : Coolidge...
I must trouble you with the transaction of the business explained in the inclosed note, and the advancing to Le Telier the money he may want as far as 300. D. the amount of the inclosed draught of the bank of the US. here on that at Norfolk in your favor. what the cost may be beyond this will be remitted by mr Claxton hereafter when the work shall have been delivered. when recieved I will pray...
We have to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 26th. inclosing a check on the US. Bank at Norfolk for $300,—which sum we have paid to Mr. Le Tellier, as he inform’d us, that to make the work exactly alike, it is necessary to have the whole melted into one mass.—We have sold your Tobacco to R & T: Gwathmey at $7 pble. half Cash & half 60 d/ say 25 hhds.—the one which was laid bye as...
On the 2d. of Sep. messrs. Jones & Howell sent from Philadelphia for me some sheet iron, & some round & square bars of iron. they were for a particular piece of work, and mr Dinsmore writes me they can go on no longer for want of them. for fear they may have been overlooked in your warehouse, I take the liberty of asking that they may be forwarded by the first boats if not gone. Dinsmore also...
We forwarded yesterday & the day before by Mr. Randolph’s & Mr. Wood’s boats, the sheet iron; bar iron, and 60 bundles being the remainder of the nail rod—The three boxes you mention were recd. a few days ago—the two for Philadelphia are put on board the Jane Capn. Jackson, and addressed to Doctor Wistar there—the other is on board the John Capn. Norris bound to Georgetown and addressed to the...
Instead of remitting to me any part of the first paiment for my tobacco as proposed in my letter of the 31st. ult. be so good as to retain it subject to my draught, which will be as convenient to me at present, & will avoid the risk of that line of the post which for some time past has been considerable. my coal is just now arrived. what you advanced for it beyond my last remittance will of...
I find my letter of the 3d. went too late to countermand the making any remittance hither, as on the day following I recieved yours of the 2d. covering 250. Dollars. I have this day drawn on you for 500. D. in favor of James Lyle at 3. days sight: and I have further to request you to place four hundred and fifty dollars in the Richmond bank to the credit of James Dinsmore of Albemarle, and to...
We send you inclosed a Certificate of $450 lodged in our Bank to the credit of James Dinsmore— We are respectfully Yours &c MHi : Coolidge Collection.
Some time in the first half of September I do not know exactly when, mr Eppes purchased a horse for me of mr Thweat his brother in law, for 250. D. payable in 90. days at your Counting house. I now inclose you that sum to take up the draught which will probably be presented shortly. I salute you with affection. MHi : Coolidge Collection.
I have duly received your favor of the 6th inclosing 250$, it being for the purpose of taking up Mr. Eppes’s dft in favor of Mr Thweatt for the purchase of a horse. I am Dear Sir Your Very humble servt. MHi : Coolidge Collection.
Judge Tucker having left this for Williamsburg on Monday last, I shall forward your letter to him by the present mail. I am Dear Sir Your Very humble servt. MHi : Coolidge Collection.
Nothing had been more fixed than my determination to keep my expences here within the limits of my salary, and I had great confidence that I had done so. having however trusted to rough estimates by my head, & not sufficiently apprised of the outstanding accounts, I find on a review of my affairs here, as they will stand on the 3d. of March, that I shall be 3. or 4. months salary behind hand....
I yesterday received your much esteemed favor of the 24th, and lost not a moment in ascertaining what could be done to relieve you from your present embarrassed situation. It is not I trust necessary for me to inform you, that I am always much averse to making professions of friendship, and of a desire to serve those I esteem—My character and disposition I hope being in some degree known to...
Your two letters of Dec 27. & Jan. 3. were recieved in due time. the former lays me under high obligations to you, not more for the real service rendered me than the affectionate manner in which it has been done. but I forbear writing to you on this subject till I learn how you have finally arranged the matter whether with the bank or a private individual. the latter would be much more...
This will be handed to you by Mr Strobia, who is so obliging as to take charge of the two boxes containing the Terrines, as well as of the small box, about which I lately wrote you. I am Dear Sir Your Very humble Servt. MHi : Coolidge Collection.
Mr. Venable having been so much longer than he expected in getting an answer respecting the money which we calculated on obtaining from his friend on loan—has caused me I fear, to delay from day to day to write to you, for a longer time than I should have done: I thought it however the less necessary to write before he received an answer, as I informed you that you might be assured of getting...
Mr. Venable has called to say that his friend (who it now appears is, Mrs. Tabb of Amelia) is willing to lend the amt. you require for six months—We therefore send you inclosed a note at that date, the one forwarded you yesterday will of course be destroyed We are respectfully Your ob Servts. MHi : Coolidge Collection.
We received yesterday your favor of the 23d. and this day obtain’d from Mr. Venable the amount of your note say $8000—from this deduct the several sums noted in your letter amounting to $2127.16 leaves a balance of $5872.84. for which we enclose you a check of the Bank of Columbia, as we understand some difficulty might arise on placing the amounts you direct to the credit of Mr. Dinsmore & Mr...
The two boxes of paste (as I conclude they are) shipped from Philadelphia so long ago as the 24th. of Decr last—were not received until yesterday. I am not acquainted with the cause of this long delay, not having yet seen the Captain. Mr. G. informs me that he inclosed you a check on the bank of Columbia, for $5872.84 on the 27th ultimo, which we have no doubt you have received. I am Dear Sir...
By a vessel just departing hence for Richmond I send a number of packages as by the inclosed , in which however I believe there may be an error or two, for I have not yet got the bill of lading. I must pray you to procure for me 3. dozen stick chairs , of the kind marked in the margin, painted black with yellow rings, & forward them for me to Lynchburg . Couch’s boats are, I believe, the most...
My packages from Washington must be now near arriving with you, and I will pray you to forward them by such boats as are deemed trusty. there will also be from mr Taggert of Philadelphia a cask of linseed oil & keg of white lead. I inclose you a bill of lading of for a box belonging to one of my workmen, mr Nelson , which he had addressed to me, to the care of your firm, which as you will see...
My letter by post yesterday desired you to send my goods from Washington by trusty boatmen. I did not then know that mr r R andolph ’s boats would go off to-day. as they are entirely trusty, I pray you to deliver to them whatever you may have for me. the molasses particularly will come safe by them. we are entirely unable to get cotton seed in this part of the country. mr Bacon at my request...
I have made diligent search after M r Nelson ’s box, but cannot find it.— Cap t Hand I understand belongs to Philadelphia , or to Alexandria ,—he is however frequently here: I will make a point of ascertaining what he has done with the box, on his return to this place.—I hope to have the pleasure of seeing you at Monticello in the course of the spring or summer. RC ( MHi ); at foot of text:...
I inclose your last quarterly account, which shews a balance in your favor of $:207.43.— Eleven of the boxes lately received for you were forwarded by M r Randolph’s boats on the 30 th ultimo , with a Hhd of Molasses.— There were no herrings to be had. RC ( MHi ); at foot of text: “Thomas Jefferson esq r
The articles sent by mr Randolph’s boats are arrived safe, except a trunk N o 28. your note by the boatmen mentions 4. trunks. they brought only 3. & suppose they recieved no more, which I presume is the fact as the contents could not be useful to them or e easily disposed of. the contents were almost entirely stationary, with a mathematical machine & some odd things intermixed. it has...
I have received eleven Hhds of your Tob o , which the person who sent it informs me is all there is. It is inspected, and is said by those who saw your crop last year, to be greatly inferior to it. I do not suppose it would at this time command more than 5 $, if even that; there being scarcely at any demand at this time for Tobacco, except for that of a very superior quality, which would suit...
I hope that you will have received the trunk N o 28, as it certainly is not here. I thought I had been particular in counting the last packages sent you, but suppose I may have made a mistake, & that perhaps has caused you to make one.—I find from referring to the bill of lading, that there were only 3 trunks, N os 26, 27, & 28.—I have no recollection of having received one at any other time—&...
Sent by M r Randolph’s boat— 29 th Ap l 1809 A box lately received from George Town , 2 barrels of cut herrings, & a bag of Cotton (50 ℔s ) The
Yours of the 21 st & 24 th are recieved. the amount of my crop of tob o is much less than I expected. Griffin is a good overseer, but has the fault of never writing to me ; so that I never learn the amount of my crop of tob o till it gets to your hands. he had informed me that the frost had been very fatal to his tob o & as I supposed from his expression, had killed about one third. I now find...
Your favor of the 1 st leaves me no hope of recovering the trunk N o 28.—it confirms me in the opinion that I sent four trunks, than which I never had been more confident of any thing in my life, until by referring to the bill of lading, I found that you had only three: but since the receipt of your letter, it occurs to us that W m A. Burwell had an empty trunk here, which we find is gone. It...
On the subject of the trunk N o 28. I am not without a hope that an interview by yourself with the drayman and Harry , the first time he goes down, may yet discover it’s fate. I am anxious, not so much for the value, tho that was considerable and the assortment of paper particular, as for the instrument (Dynamometer) which it contained, the only one in America , & imported for a particular...
I send you by M r Randolph’s boat two boxes which we have lately received.— There is some nail rod & bar iron which I had reserved, but Ben cannot carry it.—If you find you will require it before M r R’s boats will be down again, be pleased to inform me, that I may forward it by others. RC ( MHi ); endorsed by TJ as received 4 June 1809 and so recorded in SJL .
Yours of May 30. was duly recieved informing me you had sent by mr Randolph ’s boat 2 boxes lately recieved. these have since come to hand. the one was from Lemaire at Philadelphia , containing oil & syrops. the other was from mr Gelston of N. York and contained 3. doz. bottles of Burgundy wine. I inclose you his letter stating that he had recieved & should forward for me to you two
It becomes necessary for me to establish a correspondence somewhere for the supply of my groceries, that is to say, of sugar, coffee & tea and salted fish and I believe Richmond will be more convenient than Baltimore , Philadelphia , & New York , if to be had there on nearly equal terms. but as I know nobody there I must ask the favor of you to select the most eligible correspondent there for...
The two boxes mentioned in M r Gelston’s letter were received, but Major Gibbon called soon after, with a letter from Cap t Tingey of Washington , saying that one of them belonged to him, and had been forwarded to us by mistake.—it is still here, waiting for a good opportunity by which to send it to Washington .—There is no direction on the box, a card appearing to have been rubbed off.— I am...
Since writing you by this mail, a M r James Scott has called on me, with a few of the papers which must have come out of the lost trunk. M r S. lives within about five miles of Charlottesville , and, having been waiting for some Tobacco which he expected down the river, he concluded to go some miles up it, in the expectation of meeting the boat. He found the papers about a mile above the locks...
I have duly received your favor of the 12 th , and have selected the house of Gordon Trokes & Co , as being the most eligible in my opinion for the supply of your groceries.—They consent to receive payment half annually, which is more I expect than any other house here would do for such articles. I doubt however if you will be supplied even on nearly as advantageous terms, as you might be from...
If you go to Bedford as soon as you contemplate, you will be surprised I expect at not finding the 3 dozen chairs there, which you ordered several months ago.—The first person who engaged to make them disappointed us altogether, & the next one has been a long time about them.— They are however at last ready, and shall be forwarded by the first safe boat, to the care of Sam l J. Harrison RC (...
M r Venable has received notice from M rs Tabb that she will require her money at the expiration of the six months for which it was borrowed.—This will render it necessary for it to be procured from the bank.—As the sum is larger than M r V. wishes to ask for her in one day, I inclose you at his request two notes, which you will be pleased to sign & return, leaving the day of the month blank.—...
I have received information from a boatman of the name of Calloway , who lives near Lynchburg , that our lost trunk is in the possession of one Dan l Northcut , residing about 5 or 6 miles from that place, in Amherst . C. has not heard particularly what the trunk contains, but was told there were some blank books, and some blank paper in it—he has not heard of the instruments.—he understands...
Your three letters of June 16. 19. & 23. came to hand by our last post, and I now inclose you the two notes signed as desired. I am sincerely sorry for the transfer of this debt into the bank, & to have subjected mr Venable to a responsibility there which I know must be painful to him, & on that account doubles my uneasiness. a person near the Natural bridge had made me an offer for my lands...
M r Venable is now of opinion that M rs Tabb will not require her money when due, but that she will let you have it for another 6 months.—Of this however he is not certain, but requests me to forward you the inclosed note, in case it should be wanted—and which shall be returned, if it is not. RC ( MHi ); at foot of text: “Thomas Jefferson esq r ”; endorsed by TJ as received 20 July 1809 and so...
I now inclose you the renewal of my note of January for 8000.D. and sincerely wish it may be used instead of the two prepared for the bank, as I am anxious to keep out of that at least until a good impression is made on the debt. your letter of the 14 th did not get to me till the 20 th and as I observe these delays frequently I suspect carelessness in the post-office somewhere. a dysentery...
It really almost appears as if I shall never more have the pleasure of seeing you at Monticello . M r Gibson when I last wrote you, had not the most distant thought of going to the Springs this season—not having experienced as he supposed; any benefit from his visit the last.—He has suddenly however, by the advice of some of his friends, determined on making one more trial, and is gone. I now...
Our last account left me some thirty odd Dollars in your debt. I now inclose you one hundred Dollars to cover it. I wrote some little time ago to Mess rs Gordon & Trokes for a supply of groceries & took the liberty of referring them to you as to the most trust-worthy boatmen, mr Randolph ’s boats not being likely to go down soon. a number of others having gone down with the late swell of the...