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    • Washington, George
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    • Huntington, Samuel
    • Washington, George

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Correspondent="Huntington, Samuel" AND Correspondent="Washington, George"
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New Windsor [ New York ] April 18–19 , 1781 . Discusses prospects of supplies for Army. Df , in writings of Tench Tilghman and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. The postscript of this letter is dated April 19.
Our present prospects of supplies in the Article of Bread are peculiarly bad. From all the information I can collect, the whole quantity of Flour we shall be able to command in the States of Jersey and New York will not carrry us beyond the beginning of the next Month. These States having been for some time past the immediate Theatre of the War, are so full of Certificates, and coersion both...
I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of Your Excellency’s letters of the 4th and 5th instant, with the papers inclosed. The last did not arrive ’till the 14th. Previous to the receipt of it, I had directed the Commissary of Prisoners to renew a proposal some time since made the enemy for exchanging General Burgoigne, and a ballance of private prisoners due to us, against the residue of...
By advices just received from Col. Brodhead, dated at Fort Pitt the 10th Ulto I am informed there are strong indications from several quarters, that Hostilities will be committed pretty extensively on the frontiers by the Savages, at the Opening of the Campaign—that the Troops under his command are very much distressed for want of Provisions, that they have been at half allowance of meat ever...
I have been honored with your Excellencys letter of the 7th inclosing the copy of a peice of intelligence communicated by General Forman. I have yet heard nothing of the kind from New York, but still I cannot undertake to contradict it altogether. I do not however think it probable that a detachment, so large as one ought to be to merit the attention of Sir Henry Clinton himself, can be spared...
I beg leave to introduce to your Excellency Colonel Menonville, Deputy Adjutant General to the French Army. This Gentleman, who is charged by his Excellency the Count de Rochambeau with matters respecting a contract entered into by Doctr Franklin, in behalf of the United States, for the supply of a quantity of Provision, will, through your Excellency, lay his business generally before...
The inclosed Return, made up to the first of this month, will shew the number of Recruits which have joined this part of the Continental Army, since the formation of it upon the new establishment. My requests to the Executives of the several States have been earnest , and my orders to the Officers in them have been pointed and positive to send forward the Recruits as fast as possible. What to...
The business that has given constant exercise to the Pen of my Secretary; and not only frequently, but always, to those of my Aides de Camp, has rendered it impracticable for the former to register the Copies of my Letters, Instructions &ca in Books; by which means valuable documents which may be of equal public utility and private satisfaction remain in loose Sheets; and in the rough manner...
I have received Your Excellency’s favor of the 26th with its inclosures. I do myself the honor to transmit, for the information of Congress, the duplicate of a letter from the Chevalier de Touche to me, giving a minute detail of the Naval engagement on the 16th inst: The good conduct and bravery exhibited by our Allies on that occasion intitle them to the warmest thanks of the public, for tho’...
The Board of War have lately laid before me a summary of the situation of the department of the Commy General of Military Stores, for want of Money to pay the arrearages due to the Workmen, and to procure proper materials for carrying on the Business of the Elaboratories. This is a matter of so much importance, and which, if not remedied, will so materially affect our operations not only in...