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    • Huntington, Samuel

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I am honored with your Excellency’s favor of the 23d and 24th Insts. I am sorry that you took the trouble to transcribe the Dispatches from General Greene, as I had received them immediately from him. It is to be regretted that so small an accident should have turned the fortune of the day before Campden. The General’s conduct however in the action, and the perseverance with which he pursues...
I do myself the honor to inform Congress that I returned from Weathersfield yesterday Evening. I met only His Excellency the Count de Rochambeau at that place (accompanied by the Chevr de Chartellux). The British Fleet having appeared off Block Island, the Count de Barras did not think it prudent to be absent. In consequence of the measures concerted at the late interview, all the French...
His Excellency the Count de Rochambeau having received dispatches from the Court of France by his Son the Viscount de Rochambeau, who arrived at Boston in the Frigate la Concorde the 6th instant, has requested an interview with me. I have appointed the place of meeting at Weathersfield on Monday next, for which purpose, I shall set out to morrow from hence. I am in hopes we shall be able, from...
I have the honor to enclose to your Excellency, the Extract of a Letter from Col. Dayton, which is just received—As this is the first Information , I thought proper to communicate it, altho, from the circumstances of the Wind & Weather at the time the fleet is said to have sailed as well as from the number of Ships of the Line (of which there were not so many at New York,) and strength of the...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s favors of the 26th and 29th ulto with the inclosures to which you refer—They shall be duly attended to. Under cover of the letter of the 26th is one from General Gates to Congress, indorsed by the Secretary "Ordered to be transmitted to the Commander in Chief." without any particular directions respecting the subject of it. Congress have been informed...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s favors of the 20th and 23d ulto. I shall take as early measures as circumstances will admit for having an enquiry into the conduct of Colo. Brodhead and the Deputy Quarter Master at Fort pitt. Mr Fowlers Charges are so very diffuse, that I shall be obliged to call upon him to specify them more particularly, and I apprehend there will then be a...
Since my letter of the 14th to your Excellency on the subject of an immediate supply of provision for Fort Pitt, I have received the following intelligence, thro’ a good Channel, which makes the measures I then recommended more indespensably necessary—"Colonel Conolly with his corps to proceed to Quebec as soon as possible, to be joined in Canada by Sir John Johnson with a number of Tories and...
New Windsor [ New York ] April 21, 1781 . Asks Congress to authorize the quarter-master general to appoint Colonel Jabez Champlin a barrack master to be attached to the French army. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
His Excellency the Count De Rochambeau, when I was at Rhode Island, made an application to me to have Colonel Champlin of New port appointed a Barrack Master under Authority of Congress, to be attached to the French Army—His reason was—that a native vested with the authority of our own government might act with more propriety and efficacy than a foreigner, or even a native merely employed by...
New Windsor [ New York ] April 16–19 , 1781 . Describes steps taken in regard to General John Burgoyne’s parole. Sends report of British embarkations for Delaware. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. The postscript of this letter is dated April 19.
New Windsor [ New York ] April 18–19 , 1781 . Discusses prospects of supplies for Army. Df , in writings of Tench Tilghman and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. The postscript of this letter is dated April 19.
Our present prospects of supplies in the Article of Bread are peculiarly bad. From all the information I can collect, the whole quantity of Flour we shall be able to command in the States of Jersey and New York will not carrry us beyond the beginning of the next Month. These States having been for some time past the immediate Theatre of the War, are so full of Certificates, and coersion both...
I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of Your Excellency’s letters of the 4th and 5th instant, with the papers inclosed. The last did not arrive ’till the 14th. Previous to the receipt of it, I had directed the Commissary of Prisoners to renew a proposal some time since made the enemy for exchanging General Burgoigne, and a ballance of private prisoners due to us, against the residue of...
By advices just received from Col. Brodhead, dated at Fort Pitt the 10th Ulto I am informed there are strong indications from several quarters, that Hostilities will be committed pretty extensively on the frontiers by the Savages, at the Opening of the Campaign—that the Troops under his command are very much distressed for want of Provisions, that they have been at half allowance of meat ever...
I have been honored with your Excellencys letter of the 7th inclosing the copy of a peice of intelligence communicated by General Forman. I have yet heard nothing of the kind from New York, but still I cannot undertake to contradict it altogether. I do not however think it probable that a detachment, so large as one ought to be to merit the attention of Sir Henry Clinton himself, can be spared...
I beg leave to introduce to your Excellency Colonel Menonville, Deputy Adjutant General to the French Army. This Gentleman, who is charged by his Excellency the Count de Rochambeau with matters respecting a contract entered into by Doctr Franklin, in behalf of the United States, for the supply of a quantity of Provision, will, through your Excellency, lay his business generally before...
The inclosed Return, made up to the first of this month, will shew the number of Recruits which have joined this part of the Continental Army, since the formation of it upon the new establishment. My requests to the Executives of the several States have been earnest , and my orders to the Officers in them have been pointed and positive to send forward the Recruits as fast as possible. What to...
The business that has given constant exercise to the Pen of my Secretary; and not only frequently, but always, to those of my Aides de Camp, has rendered it impracticable for the former to register the Copies of my Letters, Instructions &ca in Books; by which means valuable documents which may be of equal public utility and private satisfaction remain in loose Sheets; and in the rough manner...
I have received Your Excellency’s favor of the 26th with its inclosures. I do myself the honor to transmit, for the information of Congress, the duplicate of a letter from the Chevalier de Touche to me, giving a minute detail of the Naval engagement on the 16th inst: The good conduct and bravery exhibited by our Allies on that occasion intitle them to the warmest thanks of the public, for tho’...
The Board of War have lately laid before me a summary of the situation of the department of the Commy General of Military Stores, for want of Money to pay the arrearages due to the Workmen, and to procure proper materials for carrying on the Business of the Elaboratories. This is a matter of so much importance, and which, if not remedied, will so materially affect our operations not only in...
I returned to this place yesterday at Noon. I did not prosecute my intention of visiting Springfield, as I wished not to be out of the line of communication from the Southward, on account of the important intelligences which may be hourly expected from that quarter. Give me leave sincerely to congratulate Your Excellency and Congress upon the completion of the Confederation of the United...
I do myself the honor to inform your Excellency that I arrived here on the 6th. In consequence of previous arrangements between the Count de Rochambeau and myself I found between eleven and twelve hundred of the French Grenadiers and Infantry already embarked and the Fleet nearly ready to sail. They however did not put to sea until the evening of the 8th. By advices from New London the...
New Windsor [ New York ] March 1, 1781 . Encloses a “memorial of Col Hazen.” Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
The inclosed memorial of Colo. Hazen was this day put into my hands. Many of the matters mentioned in it are better known to Congress than to myself. The whole are so fully stated as to speak for themselves and require only the determination of Congress. The case of the Canadian Officers and Soldiers I know to be peculiarly distressing and truly intitled to redress, if the means are to be...
On opening the inclosed, I found it intended for your Excellency, though addressed to me. I intend setting out in the morning for Newport to confer with the French General and Admiral on the operations of the ensuing Campaign. Major Genl Heath will command in my absence. I have the honor to be with the greatest Respect Your Excellency’s Most obt Servt P.S. I am this moment honored with your...
I was yesterday honored with your Excellency’s favor of the 21st. General Greenes letter so strongly points out the increasing danger to the Southern States, and the detachment of the pennsylvania Line to their succour makes such an alteration in our prospects here, that different dispositions, from those originally intended, are become adviseable. On this principle, I beg leave to suggest to...
New Windsor [ New York ] February 26, 1781 . States that the southern situation is alarming. Regrets that a regular and permanent force was not established in the South. Explains why French cannot comply with Congress’s request to transport French troops to the South. Is ordering the Pennsylvania troops to the South. Describes Virginia expedition. Suggests sending American frigates, now in...
I had the honor of receiving last night, your Excellency’s two letters of the 20th instant, one of them in Congress, with their inclosures. The situation of the Southern states is alarming—the more so, as the measure of providing a regular and permanent force was by my last advices, still unattempted, where the danger was most pressing and immediate. Unless all the states in good earnest enter...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s favors of the 9th instant. General Morgans signal victory over Colo. Tarleton, with the flower of the British Army, reflects the highest honor upon our Arms, and I hope will, at least, be attended with this advantage, that it will check the offensive operations of the Enemy, untill General Greene shall have collected a much more respectable force than...
I do myself the honor of returning your Excellency a letter addressed to President Reed which came under your last cover to me. I imagine your secretary has inadvertently, in making up his dispatches, inclosed my letter to the president of Pennsylvania, as he did that for him to me. I have the honor to be &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have been successively honoured with your Excellency’s favors of the 18th 24th and 27th ulto with the enclosures to which they refer. I am extremely happy to find, that my remaining in the neighbourhood of West Point, during the time of the mutiny of the Pennsylvania line, meets the approbation of Congress—and that the reasons assigned by me, for deeming it inexpedient to call for any part...
New Windsor [ New York ] February 9, 1781 . Asks Congress to decide Colonel Peter Gansevoort’s rank. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Col. Gansewort has applied to me on a subject, which I am under a necessity of referring to Congress, as they are alone competent to decide upon it. On the 4th of October 1777 they were pleased to pass a resolution of thanks to him for his bravery and performance in the defence of Fort Schuyler—appointing him, by way of reward, Colonel Commandant of the same. He also received a special...
New Windsor [ New York ] February 3, 1781 . Proposes changes in system of punishment in the Army. Asks Congress to repeal the article of war which gives commanding officers of corps the right to furlough soldiers. Encloses a form of furlough. LS , in writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
I have on different occasions done myself the honor to represent to Congress the inconveniences arising from the want of a proper gradation of punishments in our military code; but as no determination has been communicated to me, I conclude a multiplicity of business may have diverted their attention from the object. As I am convinced a great part of the vices of our discipline springs from...
New Windsor [ New York ] January 31, 1781 . Encloses reports of the New Jersey mutiny and the “West Chester” enterprise. Commends troops in both operations. LS , in writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
I have the honor to inclose Your Excellency the report of Major General Howe of his proceedings in suppressing the mutiny of the Jersey line; in which all his measures were taken with decision and propriety. Inclosed are also two other reports, of Major General Parsons and Lt Col. Hull of an enterprise against Delancey’s corps at West Chester, in which with small loss on our side, the barracks...
I have the honor to introduce to your Excellency’s acqe the Count de Charlus Son to the Marqs de Castres, Minister of the Marine of France—This Gentleman’s rank & amiable qualities are alone sufficient to entitle him to every mark of Respect but when it is known that his zeal to promote the Cause of Americas freedom induced him to resign a Colonelship of Horse in France to serve as second...
I have the honr of introducing to your acquaintance the Count De Dillon Colo. in the Duke de Lauzuns Legion—He is a Gentn of distinction, & to great personal merit adds a warm Zeal for the Service of America which cannot fail to recommend him to your Excellys esteem. I have the honr to be &ca Yr Exy &ca. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have the honr to introduce to your Exy acqe Monsr Dumat Aide de Camp to the Count de Rochambeau—a G. of merit & acknowledged Abilities—qualities which I am perswaded, will recommend him to your Esteem. I have the honr to be. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
New Windsor [ New York ] January 23, 1781 . Sends news of the New Jersey mutiny and details of what has been done to quell it. Is of the opinion that unless funds are found “our opposition must very soon cease.” Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have been successively honoured with your Excellency’s dispatches of the 12th 13th & 16th and shall duly attend to the contents. Your Excellency, probably by this time, has heard of the Revolt of the Jersey Troops in imitation of the Pensylvania line. Advice that this had been the case with a part of them, with an expectation of its becoming general, reached me the night before last—their...
The unhappy Mutiny of the Non Comd & Privates of the Pensylvania line—the perplexed state of Affairs in this quarter—the distressed condition of the Troops at West Point and in the vicinity of it, on acct of Provision & some essential articles of cloathing—combined with other embarrassments of less importance, have engrossed my whole time and attention; and must be offered as an apology for...
Congress must have been long ere this, informed by General Wayne of the Mutiny of the Pennsylvania Troops on the 1st instant, and I have no doubt but he has kept them regularly advised of what happened afterwards. I have heard nothing particular from those troops, since they reached the neighbourhood of Somerset Court House, at which place they shewed some signs of a better disposition than at...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s favor of the 21st ulto, in which Congress have been pleased to refer, the propriety of granting Genl Starkes request to them, to me. His Health is undoubtedly so much impaired, that he has been able to do but very little duty the preceding Campaign, and retirement, for a time, seems therefore necessary. Congress will either direct his return to the...
In my letter of the 13th instant, I did myself the honor to inform Congress, that an embarkation was preparing at New York, and that it was to consist, in part, of the British Grenadier’s and Light Infantry. I have since learned, from some of our Officers who have been exchanged, that those Corps were once under embarkation orders, but that there had been a change, and others substituted in...
I do myself the honor to enclose to Your Excellency the Extract of a Letter which I have just received from Governor Clinton, and which I beg leave to recommend strongly to the attention of Congress, as by this inergetic Exertion of the State of New York the Army will probably be kept from dissolution. We have not for some time received a Barrel of Flour from the Southward, except a few...
At a time when the Army is about to undergo a material change—When Congress and the States individually are disposed to establish it up on the best principles for the equal Administration of justice, and the preservation of the rights of the Officers, I am persuaded it will not be deemed presumptuous in me to offer any opinion, which in my judgment, may serve to promote either of these ends...
I have been honored with your Excellencys favor of the 6th and two of the 9th Inst. The manner in which Congress have been pleased to express their approbation of the Conduct of Major Tallmadge, and the Officers and Soldiers under his command, cannot but be very flattering to them, and will I am certain have a happy effect in encouraging the spirit of enterprize in the Army. A Paragraph in the...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s favors of the 29th Novr and 4th instant. I shall communicate to the Officers of the Army such of the Resolves as relate to them—I would beg leave to remark on that of the 29th Novr respecting the payment for wounded and disabled Horses—that it makes no provision for any that may be left wounded upon the field, and of course lost to the owners—All the...