You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Harrison, Benjamin
  • Period

    • Confederation Period
  • Correspondent

    • Harrison, Benjamin

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 7

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Harrison, Benjamin" AND Period="Confederation Period" AND Correspondent="Harrison, Benjamin"
Results 1-30 of 46 sorted by relevance
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
[ Annapolis, 24 Mch. 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “Govr. Introducing McAlister.” Letter not found; see Virginia delegates to Harrison, 22 Mch. 1784 .]
[ Annapolis, 8 May 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “Govr. Valedictory-tender of service to state.” Not found.]
[ Annapolis, 12 Dec. 1783 . Entry in SJL reads: “Governor. Definitive treaty—British proclamation on commerce.” Not found.]
[ Annapolis, 16 Apr. 1784. Entry in SJL reads: “Govr. Loan office debt established—requisitions reduced.” Not found.]
[ Annapolis, 27 Apr. 1784. Entry in SJL reads: “Govr. Post delays—not stopped here—Genl. W’s postage—M[ercer]’s letter of Apr. 10.” Not found.]
No post having arrived here from the Southward during the present month till this day, and being to return in a few minutes I am obliged without an opportunity of asking the concurrence of my collegues to inclose you a copy of the proclamation of the Definitive treaty and of it’s ratification which happily took place on the 14th. instant. Two officers were immediately dispatched to seek...
A few days after my arrival here Colo. Le Maire writer of the inclosed letter called on me and asked me to forward it to you with such explanations as I could give. As to his commission , having lost the original as he therein mentions, he asks an authenticated copy of it which he thinks will enforce some applications he is making to this government. As to the lands, I remember the gift of...
Since my last nothing material has occurred. The Indiana Company some days ago preferred a petition to Congress respecting their Claim. Jersey patronized the Interest of her Citizens and wished a fœderal Court to determine the validity of the purchase. It was however negatived on this principle; That the lands lay within the limits of Virginia and could be affected by the decision of no other...
Since my letter of this morning the post has arrived and brought us a letter from Dr. Franklin of Mar. 9. He had received a letter from Congress informing him of the reasons of delaying our ratification. He apprehends no difficulty from this circumstance, and the rather as he had received a letter from Mr. Hartley dated Mar. 2. (the day before the exchange should have taken place) desiring he...
We have received no foreign intelligence through any authentic channel since the letter from Dr. Franklin of Dec. 25. an extract from which I formerly did myself the honour of inclosing you. Through different ways however, such as to merit beleif, we have information that the utmost confusion prevails in the British government. The House of commons on the 16th of January came to a vote that...
I have had the honor to receive your letter of the 7th inst: enclosing an Act of the General Assembly, which passed at my request. This new proof of the confidence repos’d in me by my Country, lays me under additional obligations to it; and I am equally sensible of its favors, and the polite & friendly wishes with which you accompanied the act. If the etiquette of business makes it necessary...
Letter not found. 13 September 1783 . In a letter of 26 September to the Virginia delegates in Congress ( q.v. ), Governor Harrison acknowledged receipt of their letter dated thirteen days earlier. This letter, now missing, was written by Joseph Jones on behalf of the Virginia delegation and forwarded by Harrison on 20 October to John Tyler for submission by him to the Virginia General...
Mr. Jeffersons letter of this date will give your Excellency every Communication that is worth transmitting. Nothing therefore remains for me; but to manifest the Attention which I shall always feel myself happy in paying to every request which you may think proper to honour me with. I have conferred with Mr. Jefferson on the expediency of his acting as a Commissioner for extending the...
Printed text ( Burnett, Letters Edmund C. Burnett, ed., Letters of Members of the Continental Congress (8 vols.; Washington, 1921–36). , VII, 301, and n. 1). Probably written by John Francis Mercer, who signed it, and possibly also signed by Joseph Jones and JM. The original manuscript has not been found, although about 1930 it was among the Executive Papers in the Virginia State Library. We...
Your Excellencies favour of the 2nd. Inst. I was this day honoured with. It was not my Idea or that of any Gentleman in the Delegation to introduce the complaint of Mr. Cammel to the view of Congress, if justice to our Citizens could be obtained by any other means. I am happy to be informed by your Excellency that the business is in a train that promises so amicable a conclusion. Since the...
I have the honour to inform your Excellency that Congress have accepted the Cession of our Western Territory: and we have in conformity to the Act of the General Assembly of Virginia executed a deed for the same. This I trust will pave the way for similar Cessions from other States and lay the foundation for the discharge of our domestic debts. Congress have appointed Commissioners for the...
I do myself the honor to enclose your Excellency a Copy of the resolution of Assembly, voting a Bust in honor of the Marquis Fayette, and to inform you that the Speaker communicated to both Houses of Assembly the Marquis’s Letter of acknowledgment —and am, with due respect, Your Excellencys Most obedt & humble servt ALS , DLC:GW . John Beckley (1757–1807) arrived in Virginia from England in...
The duty of correspondence for the Month being devolved on me, and no authentic intelligence from abroad having been received, I have it in my power to communicate to you only what we get through the channel of the public papers. The inclosed will present to you some of the late debates of the H. of Commons, their addresses to the king and his answers. These seem to exclude the prospect of...
Long as the enclosed letter & petition appear to have been written, they never came to my hands until thursday last; the latter, altho’ called a copy, having the marks of an original paper; another copy accompanying it, inducing a belief that it is so, I delay not a moment to hand it forward. My being perfectly ignorant of the laws of the Commonwealth, & unacquainted, if such confiscations...
I have had the honor to receive your favor of the 2d—What you have asked of the Secretary at War, if obtained, is all I conceive essential to illucidate the accounts of the old & present impositions on the public—the rolls in the pay office might serve as checks to those of the Musters; but where all these are to be met with, I know not, as the Troops of Virginia were, by order of Congress,...
Since our late dispatches from Mr. Adams we have received nothing from our ministers in Europe. By these we were informed of his and Mr. Jay’s arrival in London, but as Congress hath appointed neither of these Gentlemen to that court, nor directed the scene of negotiation even with that power to be chang’d from Paris, we presume their attendance there is merely on a private visit. As yet no...
The present week affords us nothing new for communication unless it be the affecting scene of yesterday. Genl. Washington then had his last audience of Congress, laid down his commission and bid a final adieu to them and to all public life. His address on the occasion was worthy of him. This you will see in the public papers. I cannot help expressing my extreme anxiety at our present critical...
In the first moments after my return I take the liberty of sending you a copy of the Constitution which the Fœderal Convention has submitted to the People of these States. I accompany it with no observations—your own Judgment will at once descover the good, and the exceptionable parts of it. and your experience of the difficulty’s which have ever arisen when attempts have been made to...
I wrote you by the last post that some objections had been started in debate on the justice of that part of the national debt which consists in loan office certificates . The doubt was new to me. I had always considered this to be as honest a debt as any we owed: perhaps a more tender one in most cases, as being due to daughters, to younger children, to widows &c. It proved in event to be the...
The inclosed papers from Oliver Pollock came to our hands a few days ago. Ignorance of the organization of our government probably led him to make this improper address, on a business so foreign to the line of our duty. We take the liberty, on his behalf, of inclosing them to your Excellency with a copy of our answer to him. We have the honour to be with the most profound respect & esteem Your...
Letters from Holland from the middle to the last of September inform us that the citizens of the Dutch states are all in commotion. The conduct of the Prince of Orange having been such as greatly to strengthen the republican party, they are now pressing in the firmest tone a restoration of their constitutional rights. Friesland, as usual, leads the way. They have demanded of the sovereign...
I do myself the honor of inclosing you an act of Congress on the subject of Western territory as passed a few days ago. The Ordinance for opening the land office so soon as our purchases are made from the Indians is not yet passed. I also inclose a copy of the estimate and requisitions of the year as they passed Congress. This however you will shortly receive from the President officially....
In my letter of the 3d inst. I mentioned to you the gazette account of a change in the British ministry. Just in the moment of the departure of the post we received a letter from the Marquis Fayette confirming the account of the change and rectifying that of the vote of the Prince of Wales. The letter which had come here supposed the king a friend to the E. India bill and that the Prince voted...
No authentic intelligence from Europe. Public papers as late as the 27th. of January state Mr. Pitt and his associates as still in office, but having a decided majority against them in the House of commons. The king seems well affected to them, and the city of London also. He probably would dissolve the commons in hopes of getting a new house under the influence of his ministry; but the...
The bearer hereof Colo. Le Maire who was in the service of the Comw. of Virga. during the late war informs me that he is about to apply to Your Excellency on some occasion on which he would wish you to be satisfied of his rank and services in that state, and that the capture of his person effects and papers by the enemy has put it out of his power to produce to you his commission which would...