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    • Pickering, Timothy
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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Pickering, Timothy" AND Period="Washington Presidency" AND Correspondent="Hamilton, Alexander"
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In the Estimate laid before Congress at their last Sessions, I included as an Anticipation of the late Superintendant of Finance the Amount of a draft issued by him in your favor on the late Receiver of Taxes for the State of New York for Fifty thousand Dollars no part of which appears to have been paid. The circumstances attending this Anticipation not being sufficiently known by the...
The offer of your service as successor to Mr. Duer reached me in due time. I can with truth assure you, that you were one of a very small number who held a competition in my judgment and that had personal considerations alone influenced me, I could with difficulty have preferred another. Reasons of a peculiar nature, however, have determined my choice towards Mr. Tench Coxe, who to great...
[ Philadelphia, August 23, 1791. On August 26, 1791, Pickering wrote to Hamilton : “I have received … your letter of the 23d instant.” Letter not found. ] Pickering had been appointed Postmaster General on August 12, 1791.
I have received the communication which you made to me with respect to a a part of the contingent expences of the general post office, and on comparing the sum you mention with the charges for similar objects, which have been necessarily sustained in this department, and in the public service in general I cannot perceive any thing in the arrangement you propose, but what appears consistent...
Treasury Department , January 2, 1795. This letter is essentially the same as that which Hamilton wrote to Edmund Randolph on the same date. Copy, Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford. On January 2, 1795, Pickering succeeded Henry Knox as Secretary of War ( Executive Journal , I Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate (Washington, 1828), I. , 168–69). For the differences between...
I have the honor to transmit to you, a Copy of a letter from the Commissioner of the Revenue to me, on the subject of Whiskey to be purchased for the use of the Army in the present year. It has been the custom heretofore, to receive the Whiskey at the Posts of Pittsburg, Whelen and Fort Washington—and as there are no places so convenient for the purpose, I would suggest the policy of...
I have recd. your letter of this day. The estimate of the sum requisite for the Jersey Militia greatly exceeds what I had supposed to be necessary. There are two dangers attending so considerable advances on account without adequate data to guide—One that a good deal more money may be issued from the Treasury than is necessary with the inconvenience of a difficult & perhaps dilatory after...
I have delayed placing the money required by your letter of the 8th. instant, in the Treasurers hands, upon the ground of the doubts intimated in my letter of yesterday concerning the New-Jersey troops. I observe that the first months pay roll is likely to be a bad criterion, as the Troops were successively much diminished before they left the field. I am ready however to do what to you on...
Hamilton, History John C. Hamilton, Life of Alexander Hamilton, a History of the Republic of the United States of America (Boston, 1879). , VI, 243. John Church Hamilton states that H wrote to members of George Washington’s cabinet on this date. No further evidence of this correspondence, however, has been found.
I duly received your letter of the 17th. which needed no apology as it will always give me pleasure to comply with any wish of yours connected with the public service, or your personal satisfaction. Good men, in the idea of your appointment to the office of Secretary of State, will find many consolations for your removal from one in which your usefulness was well understood. I wish it was easy...
Mr. Cutting has given to me a perusal of his papers, respecting his agency in revealing our seamen from British impress. He wished my opinion professionally respecting the validity of his claim, which I declined to give, because it would contradict certain maxims I have prescribed to myself with regard to public questions pending while I was part of the administration. But there are reasons...
Inclosed is a letter which I will thank you to hand to its destination. While I have my pen in my hand, give me leave to mention a particular subject to you. Mr. Pinckney, it is said, desires to return to the U States. In this case a successor will be wanted. If we had power to make a man for the purpose, we could not imagine a fitter than Mr. King . He is tired of the Senate & I fear will...
I communicated your letter to Mr. Jay & now give you our joint sense. Considering the nature of the transaction and what must necessarily have been presumed to be the intent, & that the authority is on a public subject & between two nations, we think that a decision by two out of three commissioners must be sufficient. We know nothing but an immediate personal interest in property which may be...
Some time since Mr. McCormick spoke to me about the case of his Kinsman Mr. Pitcairn whom Mr. Monroe had prevented from exercising the functions of Consul. I can, in justice, inform you that this Gentleman is well considered in our City and that his political principles have been understood to be very friendly to the French Revolution; nor have we any doubt that his sentiments towards our own...
I remember that very early in the day & prior to any act of Great Britain the French passed a decree violating with regard to all the neutral powers the principle of free ships free goods & I think making provisions liable to seizure. This decree was afterwards rescinded as to America—then again revived & then again revoked. I want copies of these decrees for a particular purpose useful to the...
I duly received your letter of the 23 of Jany with its inclosure, for which I am much obliged to you. I have read it with great pleasure. It is a substantial satisfactory paper will do good in this Country & as to France I presume events will govern there. Is it not proper to call upon the Merchants to furnish your Department with statements & proofs of the spoliations which we have suffered...
If I recollect right, Chancellor Livingston while Secy for foreign Affairs reported a censure upon Our Commissioners who made the peace with G Britain for not obeying their instructions with regard to France. Will you favour me in confidence with the real state of this business? I was at the time a member of Congress. It was immediately on the arrival of the provisional articles. I trust my...