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    • Hamilton, Alexander

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I am vexed My Dear Betsey that the blunder of a servant prevented the inclosed from going by the Post of yesterday. I am well aware how much in my absence your affectionate and anxious heart needs the consolation of frequently hearing from me; and there is no consolation which I am not very much disposed to administer to it. It deserves every thing from me. I am much more in debt to you than I...
I arrived here this day, in about as good health as I left home though somewhat fatigued. There are some things necessary to be done which I omitted mentioning to you. I wish the Carpenters to make and insert two Chimnies for ventilating the Ice-House, each about two feet Square & four feet long half above and half below the ground—to have a cap on the top sloping downwards so that the rain...
I arrived here My beloved Betsey the fifth day after we set out, the three first days with every favourable circumstance but the two last through very bad weather. I am however as well as I can be absent from you and my darling boy —nor was I ever more impatient to be at home. I can have little pleasure elsewhere. I hope and persuade myself My Betsey is not less desirous for my return....
I thank you My beloved for your letter by the Post. I have time only to tell you that I am well and to request to be remembered to your sister & to Mrs. Mitchell Adieu My beloved. ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. Letter not found. Ann Venton Mitchell, H’s cousin, had been known to him during his boyhood on St. Croix in the West Indies.
In my last letter My Dearest Angel I informed you that there was a greater prospect of activity now than there had been heretofore. I did this to prepare your mind for an event which I am sure will give you pain. I begged your father at the same time to intimate to you by degrees the probability of its taking place. I used this method to prevent a surprise which might be too severe to you. A...
[ Head of Elk, Maryland, September 5, 1781. On September 6, 1781, Hamilton wrote to Elizabeth Hamilton : “Yesterday … I wrote to you … to the care of Mr. Morris.” Letter not found. ]
I yesterday informed my beloved of my arrival here. A very good night’s rest has put me in as pleasant a state as I can be when absent from my dear and excellent Eliza. But the pressure of my engagements obliges me to confine myself to the information that I am in good health; which I am glad to know is of more importance than any thing else I could say. Kiss all my Children for me. Adieu My...
Yesterday, My beloved Eliza, I wrote you by water to the care of a Capt Boyed. I in that letter informed you of my painful detention here by the slow progress of the Court and of my extreme anxiety to be with you. Your Sister Peggy had a better night last night than for three weeks past and is much easier this morning. Yet her situation is such as only to authorise a glimmering of hope. Adieu...
You cannot imagine My beloved Betsey how much I am afflicted at learning by your letter of the 6th instant, that you had not received one from me. It is wholly inconceivable. I wrote you from New York before my departure from that place which was the Sunday after you left it, and sent the letter to the Post Office by Charles. I write by this opportunity to him to Endeavour to trace it. On my...
I had hoped my very Dear Betsey that I should have had no occasion to write you again from this place—but our business unavoidably spins out the time beyond our calculation. It however now certainly draws to a close, and it is hardly possible that I should not be able to leave Philadelphia on Thursday. I ardently and anxiously wish to do it. Be assured of this, and exert your patience. Take...
It is with great pleasure, I am able to inform my beloved Eliza that I continue to progress in convalescence; so that I propose to go to day from your Uncles where I have been to claverack where the Arbitrators are. But I do not mean to take any other part than that of Chamber Counsel in the business, till I am quite strong, for it will be my careful endeavour not to hazard another relapse. I...
I wrote you two or three times last week. But since my last I have received another letter from you which does not remove my anxiety. The state of our dear sick angel continues too precarious. My heart trembles whenever I open a letter from you—The experiment of the Pink root alarms me but I continue to place my hope in Heaven. You press to return to me. I will not continue to dissuade you. Do...
Yesterday, my lovely wife, I wrote to you, inclosing you a letter in one to your father, to the care of Mr. Morris. To-morrow the post sets out, and to-morrow we embark for Yorktown. I cannot refuse myself the pleasure of writing you a few lines. Constantly uppermost in my thoughts and affections, I am happy only when my moments are devoted to some office that respects you. I would give the...
I am thus far, My Dear Eliza, on my way to New York. But I am under a necessity of viewing the ground for Winter Quarters to day—which will prevent my being with you before tomorrow. Then please God I shall certainly embrace you & my Dear John. A thousand blessings upon you   Yrs. Ever ALS , the Reverend Alexander van Cortlandt Hamilton, Norwalk, Connecticut. H was returning to New York after...
I wrote to you, My Eliza, from Trenton. Yesterday afternoon I arrived at this place. I have yielded to the pressing solicitations of Mr. Wolcott to take up my abode at his house, which you know is at the corner of Spruce and Fourth Streets. Mrs Wolcott is in better health than she was but is still very thin and feeble. Without much more care than the thing is worth, her stay in this...
I expected with certainty my beloved Betsey to have left this place to day. Our business has consumed more time than was necessary. But that is not my fault. I cannot make every body else as rapid as myself. This you know by experience. Tis a consolation however that we cannot be detained much longer. It is difficult for Sloth itself to spin it out beyond this day & I shall fly to you the...
I just take up my pen My Dear Eliza to assure you of all our health & of our continual & fervent prayers for you & those with you. Your last letter and one from Doctor Stringer have been received. The latter gave me hopes; though I shall tremble as often as I open a letter from Albany till My Darling boys situation has become more decided. God of his infinite mercy grant that he may be...
I wrote to you My beloved Betsey at Philadelphia; but through mistake brought off the letter with me; which I did not discover till my arrival here. I was not very well on the first part of the journey; but my health has been improved by travelling and is now as good as I could wish. Happy, however I cannot be, absent from you and my darling little ones. I feel that nothing can ever compensate...
This morning my b⟨e⟩loved Eliza I leave Albany for C⟨lav⟩erack, my health greatly mended ⟨a⟩nd I hope to make but a short stay there. My plan is to go to Poughkepsie and there embark. I shall be glad to find that my dear little Philip is weaned, if circumstances have rendered it prudent. It is of importance to me to rest quietly in your bosom. Adieu my beloved. Kiss all the Children for me....
I wrote you my beloved Betsey by the last post, which I hope will not meet with the fate that many others of my letters must have met with. I count upon setting out to see you in four days; but I have been so frequently disappointed by unforeseen events, that I shall not be without apprehensions of being detained, ’till I have begun my journey. The members of Congress are very pressing with me...
[ Poughkeepsie, New York, August 9, 1798. On August 9, 1798, Hamilton wrote to his wife : “I have just written you by the Post.” Letter not found. ]
I wrote to you, My beloved Eliza, by the Monday’s Post. You will be glad to hear that your dear boys & myself continue in good health & that they thus far behave well. I hope they will continue to do so—for in our mutual love & in them consist all our happiness. I trust you are by this time arrived & shall impatiently look out for a letter from you. Our public affairs continue to march in a...
I wrote you two days since My Dear Betsey, but as I am informed by one of the Gentlemen at Head Quarters that there is an opportunity for Philadelphia, I embrace it with that pleasure which I always feel in communicating with you. You complain of me my love, for not writing to you more frequently, but have I not greater reason to complain of you? Since I left Kings ferry, I have received three...
I have not yet received a line from you since my departure. It is a consolation which my heart needs & which I hope not to be long without. As yet it is uncertain when I shall be able to return though I dare not now hope that it will be less than a fortnight from this time. The delay will be to me irksome. I discover more and more that I am spoiled for a military man. My health and comfort...
Your letter of the 3d. of September my angel never reached me till to day. My uneasiness at not hearing from you is abated by the sweet prospect of soon taking you in my arms. Your father will tell you the news. Tomorrow Cornwallis and his army are ours. In two days after I shall in all probability set out for Albany, and I hope to embrace you in three weeks from this time. Conceive my love by...
[ Westchester Chester , New York, March 17, 1785. Hamilton wrote to Elizabeth Hamilton : “I have just written to you My beloved by the person who will probably be the bearer of this.” Letter not found. ]
I came to this place my beloved Betsy a day or two since to meet some Gentlemen from New York on business. Since you left me I have received but one letter from you, which informed me of the indisposition of My Dear James and left me in no small anxiety on his account. I hope on my return to Philadelphia I shall find a letter from you & Heaven Grant that it may assure me of your being all...
I thank you my beloved for your precious letter by the post. It is full of that tender love which I hope will characterise us both to our latest hour. For my own part I may say, there never was a husband who could vie with yours in fidelity and affection. I begin to be insupportably anxious to see you again. I hope this pleasure may not be long delayed. I wish you to take advantage of the...
I am vexed and chagrined, My beloved Eliza, that I cannot come out to day as I intended. I had requested a Meeting of the Manumission Society for this forenoon; but for some reason unknown to me, it is called for this Evening seven oClock. I cannot of course help attending and I have little hope that it will break up in time to make the journey this Evening. To indemnify myself, in some sort,...
I hoped with the strongest assurance to have met you at Eliz Town; but this change of weather has brought upon me an attack of the complaint in my kindneys, to which you know I have been sometimes subject in the fall. So that I could not with safety commit myself to so rude a vehicle as the stage for so long a journey. I have therefo⟨re⟩ prevailed upon Mr. Meyer to go to Elizabet⟨h⟩ Town to...