Alexander Hamilton Papers
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George Clinton to Alexander Hamilton and William Floyd, 16 April 1783

George Clinton
to Alexander Hamilton and William Floyd

Pokeepsie [New York] 16th April 1783

Gentlemen,

I have prevailed on the Bearer, the Attorney Genl.1 to Repair to Philadelphia for the Express Purpose of disclosing to you certain Information of a very interesting Nature.2 The Communications he is to make are too extensive to be the subject of a Letter & it might be improper to intrust them to Paper. I, therefore, begg Leave to refer you to Mr. Benson for the Particulars of which he is fully possessed.

Your letter of the 9th Instant inclosing one to Mr. Tappen is this Moment received.3 The Inclosure shall be forwarded by a safe and speedy Conveyance.

I have the Honor to be, &c.

G.C.

To Wm. Floyd and Alexr. Hamilton, Esquires.
Delegates for the State of New York in Congress.

Public Papers of George Clinton description begins Public Papers of George Clinton (New York and Albany, 1900). description ends , VIII, 139–40.

1Egbert Benson was attorney general of the State of New York.

2The information disclosed by Benson was doubtless an account of his interview with Sir Guy Carleton, the British commander in America (H and Floyd to Clinton, April 23, 1783). On April 8, 1783, Governor Clinton asked Benson to interview Carleton, and on April 17, Benson sent the governor a detailed report of his conversations with the British commander. Benson’s mission evidently was to arrange a meeting between Carleton and Clinton to discuss plans for the evacuation of New York City by the British. Although Carleton agreed to such a meeting, Benson was convinced “that Sir Guy Carleton is not seriously disposed to enter into a Convention, and that he only intends to save appearances to negotiate and by that means to effect a Delay, but I will not hazard a Conjecture for what purpose” (Public Papers of George Clinton description begins Public Papers of George Clinton (New York and Albany, 1900). description ends , VIII, 140–44).

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