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Documents filtered by: Period="Washington Presidency" AND Correspondent="Hamilton, Alexander"
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1) Dr. Pierre Van Cortlandt Cr. £     1784 Feby To this sum due for the Clerkship of his son P. V. Cortlandt commenced 150     Dr. Jacob LeRoy & Sons Cr. 1784 To this sum due for the Clerkship of his son Jas. LeRoy commenced this day 150     this sum given up as Mr. LeRoy did not continue his Clerkship 150     May To opinion given in the case of Kelly & Lot 1.10.0 
I arrived My Dear Betsey at this place yesterday Evening not so much fatigued as I expected to have been but with my Cold somewhat increased. I am however better to day and hope to finish my business so as to return on Thursday. If a Vessel offers at the time and a fair wind I may take that mode of conveyance. I hope you have been attentive to your medicine. Remember Mrs. Powel on the...
[ 1789–1795 .] Encloses the decision of the Federal District Court of Connecticut on the petition of Captain Timothy Savage. Suspects Savage of intent to defraud. LS , Yale University Library. The MS is a fragment without date or place.
Mr. Hamilton will with pleasure execute the command of the President by the time appointed and have the honor of waiting upon him. AL , Photostat, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Mr Hamilton will with pleasure execute the command of the President by the time appointed and have the honor of waiting upon him. AL , CtY .
[ Boston, 1789. ] Discusses the difficulty of distinguishing between goods on which duties have been paid and those on which they have not been paid. Proposes a system of branding casks, chests, and boxes, and marking bales to prevent smuggling. LC , RG 36, Letters from the Treasury and Others, 1789–1818, Vol. 11, National Archives.
The father of his Country being now Invested with the full powers of his Office, I presume he will therefore very soon make the necessary Arrangements in the Revenue, let me entreat you therefore my Dear friend to exert yourself for me, with the President, the Number of Applicants I find are so very many, that it will be necessary to be early for fear of disappointments. Excuse me my Dear Coll...
In conformity to the intimation you were pleased to honor me with on evening last I have reflected on the etiquette proper to be observed by the President and now submit the ideas which have occurred to me on the subject. The public good requires as a primary object that the dignity of the office should be supported. Whatever is essential to this ought to be pursued though at the risk of...
I beg you to accept my unfeigned thanks for your friendly communications of this date—and that you will permit me to entreat a continuation of them as occasions may arise. The manner chosen for doing it, is most agreeable to me. It is my wish to act right; if I err; the head & not the heart, shall, with justice , be chargeable. With sentiments of sincere esteem & regard I am Dear Sir   Your...
In conformity to the intimation you were pleased to honor me with on evening last I have reflected on the etiquette proper to be observed by the President and now submit the ideas which have occurred to me on the subject. The public good requires as a primary object that the dignity of the office should be supported. Whatever is essential to this ought to be pursued though at the risk of...
I beg you to accept my unfeigned thanks for your friendly communications of this date—and that you will permit me to entreat a continuation of them as occasions may arise. The manner chosen for doing it, is most agreeable to me. It is my wish to act right; if I err, the head & not the heart, shall, with justice, be chargeable. With sentiments of sincere esteem & regard I am Dear Sir Your Obedt...
I have been at a stand whether to forward to you the Enclosed, or not, for fear you might Imagine me troublesome. Necessity has at length over Come my delicate feelings, and I have concluded to transmit it to you, with an Anxious hope that you will Interest yourself in behalf of Old Servant to his Country, who has sacrificed health and fortune to Serve his Country and now finds himself reduced...
The interview between us yesterday was altogether unexpected. I thought it proper to be candid. But I trust you will consider what I said as confidential. I mean to consult mutual friends; and to act agreeably to the most scrupulous delicacy. My final determination shall be communicated. If Whatever may be the issue it shall not be my fault, if it causes any interruption of that friendly...
Your letter by last nights post is come to hand, but not that relative to the Election in the Southern district. If there is a majority of 300 in our favor in the Southern district, indeed if the votes there are ballanced, we have every reason to conclude that we shall be victors. We have Accounts here that at the poles in some parts of Westchester and Orange the tickets for Governor Lieut...
Brookhaven [ New York ] May 22, 1789 . “The Cases between Wells, and Wickham, & myself have been long enough in Court to have been determined, yet by fraudulent delays I know not how they stand.… I mean not to direct, but to desire proper care to be taken to prevent fraudulent tricks and delays, so that I may have my Money which they mean to cheat me out of.…” ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of...
Tho’ you may have no predilection to serve one printer more than another, as all of them, may have been obliging to you—yet, give me leave to mention a few Arguments, which I shall offer to convince you that my claims are better founded than some others, now candidates for the public printing. 1. I have one of the best offices in this City—consequently, having good hands, can do Printing work,...
I am miserable My beloved angel that I cannot yet come to you; but this abominable business still detains us & will do it for some days. I would willingly endure the fatigue of a journey to visit you, if it were but for a minute; but such is my situation and the expectation of those for whom I act, that I cannot get away for an hour. It cannot however much longer keep me from my beloved; and...
Baltimore, May 31, 1789. Acknowledges receipt of a letter from Hamilton enclosing “a Bond from Mrs. Hammond of Baltimore to Thomas & Richard Lee of Leeds bearing date the 20th. Sepr. 1788.” ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. Smith was practicing law in Baltimore at the time this letter was written. In 1801, he was appointed Secretary of the Navy by Thomas Jefferson. Letter not found....
[ New York, June 4, 1789. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from G— — Washington to General Hamilton,” Columbia University Libraries.
New York, June 12, 1789. Authorize Hamilton to “become security to Mr Robert Boyd for a Certain Sum of money left us as a Legacy by our late Grand Father John Cockle of Jamaica on Long Island.” ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. At the bottom of the letter is a bond in the writing of H and signed by John Cockle.
New York, June 12, 1789. “… [During the American Revolution] I Lodgd. at piramus in New Jersey. Early the Next morning we were Alarmd. by a party of the British, where I narrowly Escapd. with my life, and was Deprived of all I had in the World Except a few Loan office Certificates.… I am now A Ruind. man, and if my Country Shoud. not think that I merit Some Little Relief for the Support of my...
I am informed the Inhabitants of New York have it in Contemplation to make Mr King one of our Senators. Under this Persuasion I have thrown it out in Conversation to several of the Country Members & have found it very generally disapproved of, so much so, that I am satisfied it cannot at present be accomplished. I am afraid, too, it would interfere with the Appointment of Genl. Schuyler, in...
Newton [ Massachusetts ] June 29, 1789 . Requests Hamilton to accept “Mr. Charles Jackson, Son of General Michael Jackson,” as a law clerk. ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. Hull, after service in the American Revolution, practiced law in Newton, Massachusetts.
Eulogium on the late Major General Greene There is no duty that could have been assigned to me by this Society, which I should execute with greater alacrity than the one I am now called upon to perform. All the motives capable of interesting an ingenuous and feeling mind conspire to prompt me to its execution. To commemorate the talents virtues and exploits of great and good men is at all...
I arrived here on Friday night. I can do no business with the court of errors so anxious is the Legislature to adjourn. It is generally thought that the appointmen⟨t⟩ of Senators will be completed tomorrow or next day at farthest after which nothing will keep the members together except some Indian business which has just turned up. When our friends met it seems they judged it most prudent to...
I received your letter by the last Post but one. I immediately sat about circulating an idea, that it would be injurious to the City to have Duane elected—as the probability was, that some very unfit character would be his successor. My object was to have this sentiment communicated to our members. But a stop was put to my measures, by a letter received from Burr, announcing that at a general...
Mr. Charles Adams, my Second Son, the Bearer of this Letter, I beg leave to introduce to you.—He took his degree at our University of Cambridge this year, and is destined to the Study of the Law.—I wish to get him into some office in New York, and should give the Preference to you But there are two Contingencies, one possible the other probable in the Way. The first is that Congress may force...
Mr Charles Adams, my second son, the Bearer of this Letter, I beg leave to introduce to you. He took his degree at our University of Cambridge this year, and is destined to the Study of the Law. I wish to get him into some office in New York, and should give the Preference to yours. But there are two Contingencies, one possible the other probable in the way. The first is that Congress may...
Forty days after Date I promise to pay to Alexander Hamilton on order for Value received the Sum of Two thousand Specie Dollars. ADS , New-York Historical Society, New York City. Duer, financier and merchant, had been appointed secretary of the Board of Treasury in March, 1786. He was soon to serve under H as Assistant Secretary Assistant to the Secretary of the newly organized Treasury...
The Duties to be collected are imposed only upon Goods imported into the United States after the first of August. Consequently no Goods imported on or before that Day are charged with those Duties. And I am of Opinion that all such Goods may be carried to and landed at any other Port of the United States Duty free. The Act regulating the Collection of the Duties requires the Master or Person...