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    • Livingston, Gilbert
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    • Hamilton, Alexander

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    Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Author="Livingston, Gilbert" AND Period="Confederation Period" AND Correspondent="Hamilton, Alexander"
    Results 11-20 of 26 sorted by date (ascending)
    Ham[ilton]—an explanatory clause ought to explain, not to affix a new Idea— the dividing the state into districts is explanatory but the qualifying part is not— Gilbert Livingston MS Notes, MS Division, New York Public Library. See “New York Ratifying Convention. First Speech of July 19,” note 1 . At this point in the proceedings the Convention took up the second part of the “Bill of Rights”...
    Ham[ilton]—combats the propriety of the word “ expresly ” congress one to regulate trade—now they must do a thousand things—not expresly given—Virginia say not given — Gilbert Livingston MS Notes, MS Division, New York Public Library. See “New York Ratifying Convention. First Speech of July 19,” note 1 . H’s remarks were on the proposed explanatory amendment. It reads as follows: “That no...
    Ham[ilton]—would not object to the Idea—recommends this amend[men]t— Gilbert Livingston MS Notes, MS Division, New York Public Library. See “New York Ratifying Convention. First Speech of July 19,” note 1 . H is referring to the following explanatory amendment suggested to the Convention by John Lansing, Jr.: “That all appeals from any Court proceeding according to the Course of the common Law...
    Ham[ilton]—this [amendment] cannot be by way of explanation—but may be by recommendation. Gilbert Livingston MS Notes, MS Division, New York Public Library. See “New York Ratifying Convention. First Speech of July 19,” note 1 . The proposed amendment reads as follows: “That the Judicial p⟨ower⟩ of ⟨the⟩ United States as to Controversies between Citizens of different States is not to be...
    Ham[ilton]—this not an explanitory amend[men]t— may be recommendatory—which he would wish—in regulating commerce—this power seems to be incident—thinks that it may be possible that it will be useful—therefore thinks it ought to be left out. [Samuel] Jones—it cannot be an explanation— [John] Lansing—Congress have no power about the business except a regulation of commerce—...
    Hamilton objects because there is no security in it—the people are excluded from chusing perhaps your best man— [Melancton] Smith would rather have him elected for 8 yrs & not eligible again—Mov[e]d for it—Jay seconded his Mot[io]n. Ham[ilton]—opposes—a temptation for an avaritious man—to plunder & make the best of his time—has not the motive to please— [Melancton] Smith Much may be said on...
    Ham[ilton]—among other reasons ag[ains]t it— mentions the probability of having the appointments better thro[ugh] the states, as the senators represent all the states— Gilbert Livingston Papers, MS Division, New York Public Library. H was opposing an amendment which provided “That the Congress appoint in such manner as they may think proper a Council to advise the President in the Appointment...
    That the last mentioned Amendment having been read Mr. Hamilton moved that the same should be obliterated and the following inserted in its stead vizt. “That When the Number of Persons in the District of Territory to be laid out for the Seat of the Government of the United States, shall according to the Rule for the Apportionment of Representatives and direct Taxes Amount to such District...
    Ham[ilton]—improper in a war, or in the case of a war to publish a state of accounts to all the world— Gilbert Livingston MS Notes, MS Division, New York Public Library. In this speech H was discussing the following amendment: “That an Account of the Receipts and Expenditures of public Money shall at least once in every Year be transmitted to the Executives of the several States to be laid...
    Ham[ilton]—this will increase appeals—but does not much oppose—[Samuel] Jones—this will seldom happen—& cannot last Ham[ilton]—it may opperate to the prejudice of the poor— Gilbert Livingston MS Notes, MS Division, New York Public Library. In this speech H was discussing the following proposed amendment to the Constitution: “That Congress shall not constitute ordain or establish any Tribunals...