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Documents filtered by: Period="Adams Presidency" AND Correspondent="Hamilton, Alexander"
Results 51-80 of 4,719 sorted by editorial placement
I thank you, My Dear Sir, for your letter of the 6th. of February. The intelligence that the Directory have ordered away our Minister is every way unpleasant. It portends too much a formal Rupture as the only alternative to an ignominious submission. Much public feeling has been excited. But the Government, I trust and believe, will continue prudent and do every thing that honor permits...
New Ark [ New Jersey ] April 10, 1797 . “I have considered your propositions in the business of Col. Fays and reflected on the situation of his partner, and would rather sacrifice what is my right—then bare hard on him.… If he will take up two Notes which I have given, and are lodged in Mr. Seatons hands the one for two hundred & thirty four dollars payble 10 May—the other for seven hundred &...
The Governor left this on the day of the date of your letter covering one for him —which as it is now useless I do not return to you. I am so much in disposed that I apprehend I shall not be able to attend Congress at the opening of the session, If it all. In the present posture of our affairs, France seems to have left us no Alternative but a mean and Ignominous submission to her despotic...
Since my last to you I have perused with great satisfaction your little work on our Governments. I like the execution no less than the plan. If my health & leisure should permit, I would make some notes, but you cannot depend on it, as I am not only extremely occupied but in feeble health. I send you My ideas of the course of Conduct proper in our present situation. It is unpleasant to me to...
It must be acknowleged by all who can comprehend the subject that the present situation of the UStates is in an extreme degree critical, demanding in our public councils a union of the greatest prudence with the greatest firmness. To appreciate rightly the course which ought to be pursued it is an essential preliminary to take an accurate view of the situation. That the preservation of peace...
I thank you for your Letter of April 5th. & enclose Mr. Kings Letter. I presume that the British Comrs. under the 6th. Article (for Debts) will contend for a similar construction respecting cases determined in our Courts. Is there any ground on which the principle can be opposed? Are we to consider the British Credit as at an end, if so what effects, will it probably produce here? Your further...
I enclose you, my dear Sir, the letter I mentioned to you last evening that I had recd. from the other side of the Ocean on the subject of our conversation. I presume it may eventually be necessary for me to go over, but there is much reason to apprehend that I hazard more in going than most ordinary persons, and which merits some consideration on my part as well as my friends. I know what I...
The post of today brought me a letter from you. I am just informed that an order is come to the Custom House not to clear out any Vessel if armed , unless destined for the East Indies. Under the present circumstances I very much doubt the expediency of this measure. The excesses of France justify passiveness in the Government and its inability to protect the Merchants required that it should...
The letter you sent me has been confined to myself; but the other letters you have written on the same subject, has in your successor at least created some unpleasant feelings. Where opinions clash, and where superiority is made too apparent something a little like envy will come into play especially should a suspicion take place that pains are used to gain proselites. I have this moment...
We arrived here last Evening well and shall proceed immediately on our journey. I forgot my brief in the cause of Le Guen against Gouverneur which is in a bundle of papers in my armed Chair in the Office. Request one of the Gentlemen to look for it and send it up to me by the post of Tuesday. Beg them not to fail. Adieu My beloved. Kiss all the Children for me. Yrs. ALS , Mr. George T....
Philadelphia, April 17, 1797. “As I wish to have the Suit against Armstrong & Barnwall Brought to an end, I wrote to Capn Briggs at New London to be ready for this next court. I received: Last saturday his answer was that tho’, he was just from Sea, that he was forced to Sett off immediately for Jeremie.… Pray what and how Shall I do? It is indispensable for you to take the properest means So...
I informed you My Darling by a letter which will go by post of my arrival here in good health and finding your family well. But this morning your papa has an attack of the Gout, not particularly severe, one indeed which in a different situation would give no uneasiness—but as his strength has been of late somewhat diminished, it is impossible not to feel anxiety about him. On the whole I...
I enclose you a further request on the subject of the paper communicated to you in my last, that you may have the whole before you and that you may aid me with your talents and experience. It strikes me that, it will be proper for the Pres. to state to Congress the species of defensive force necessary for the occasion, and consider it an essential attribute of negociations I had given him in...
New Ark [ New Jersey ] April 20, 1797 . “I wrote you a few days ago relative to my business with F. … and as I have not heard any thing from you on the subject, I take it for granted they have shuffled as usual, if so, please to order the writ to be issued at once—and in order to give you no further trouble of negociating with persons so little disposed to the common rules of equity—I have...
I just now received the enclosed letter from grandpapa, in answer to a letter I wrote to him, in which he has enclosed to me three receipts for shares in the Tontine Tavern, amounting to £100. I have given the receipts to mama. I delivered my speech to Dr. Johnson to examine. He has no objection to my speaking; but he has blotted out that sentence which appears to be the best and most animated...
The consideration for the candidates in the better part of the community stands nearly thus. Clarkeson , ver Plank , Fish = Walker , Burrall , Giles ,
Lest my Dear Eliza any circumstance should have prevented your departure before this reaches you, I conclude to drop you a line to tell you your Father is considerably better at the same time considering the delicate state of his health generally I am very desirous you should come up as he is. Yrs. Most Affec ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For background to this letter, see H to...
Les Evênements inatandue qui ont Empeschés Mr. Burr de se réndre issy à temps de Vous Seconder dans mon Affaire, ont Parue Vous désobliger, sa présance est peu m’estre favorable. Néamoints, Monsieur, Vos talens, Votre Zélle, et L’integrités de Ceux qui doivent Estre mes Juges, ne me Laisse pas le Moindre doute que Vos Efforts ne me feront Obtenir un Jugement favorable. Enconcequ’ence Sy Vous...
[ New York, April 24, 1797 ] “The Memorial of Sundry Inhabitants of the City of New York and the vicinity thereof Respectfully Sheweth That your Memorialists have learnt … that the Corporation of the City of New York have purchased a lot of Ground situate in the Seventh Ward … which they intend to Convert into a Potters Field for the interment of the bodies of such persons as may die of...
[ Albany ] April 28 [ 1797 ]. “The situation of General Schuyler & other family circumstances do not permit me to attend Court this day. Will you do me the favour to argue the motion for setting aside the Non suit & granting a new trial on the inclosed case? …” ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. Philip Schuyler, H’s father-in-law, was ill. See H to Elizabeth Hamilton, April 19 , 23,...
Unless greater attention is given to the procuring of the requisite evidence in the Cases of Capture than has yet been done, we shall ultimately meet with serious Losses, and give occasion to much Complaint. The Sufferers depend on the Government, and the Government on the Sufferers, and thus that wh. shd. be done is omitted. I inclose to you a copy of notes wh. Mr. Gore & I made this morning...
I now send you a cursory answer to certain questions. They are imperfect & probably will come too late. But court avocations and distress in the family have prevented any thing better. General Schuyler has been critically ill though now as I hope out of danger. My Brother in law Mr. Rensselaer has just lost a favourite Daughter one & the Eldest of two Children without a prospect of more. The...
To The first.   It is difficult to fix the precise point at which indignity or affront from one state to another ceases to be negotiable without absolute humiliation and disgrace. It is for the most part a relative question—relative to the comparitive strength of the parties—the motives for peace or war—the antecedent relations—the circumstances of the moment as well with regard to other...
In contemplating the idea suggested by you, of arming the merchant vessels of the United States for Defence only , a difficulty at once presented. This measure is incompatible with the right of a belligerent power to visit and examine neutral vessels, to ascertain whether they have on board contraband goods—&, where a treaty does not alter the law of nations, whether they are laden with...
Situated as I am at this moment I am obliged to confine myself to very general hints respecting the paper of the 15 of April. As to the first head—I think it will be adviseable that the Speech should be confined to the foreign Affairs of the Country giving the primary & prominent place to those with France. This will make the main business the more striking. Domestic matters may follow in...
I shod. sooner have acknowledged the receipt of your interesting communication, had I not been informed of your Journey to Albany. I coincide perfectly in opinion with you as to the expediency of measures of defence, & an extraordy. mission. But I see very considerable difficulty in the measure of a Commission, & still greater in its’ including Jefferson & Madison. From the former plan I...
Some days since I received with great pleasure your letter of the 10th. of March. The mark, it affords, of your kind attention, and the particular account it gives me of so many relations in Scotland are extremely gratifying to me. You no doubt have understood that my fathers affairs at a very early day went to wreck; so as to have rendered his situation during the greatest part of his life...
[New York] May 3, 1797 . “I forward to you … a Deed to Marvil Ellis for a tract of Land sold to him under a Contract (which I believe was enclosed as I cannot lay my hands on it). This Instrument was executed at the time that I was extremely ill & the mortgage & Bonds for the payment of ¾ s. the value of the Land were all perfected.… Mr Ellis expressing great anxiety to have the Writings...
[ Boston, May 6, 1797. On June 28, 1797, Hamilton wrote to Mann and Parker : “Your letter of the 6th of May last by making a circuit to Albany did not reach me in due time.” Letter not found. ] Mann was a Boston physician. Parker, a lawyer in Castine, District of Maine, was a member of the House of Representatives from 1797 to 1799.
On my return here I found your letter of the 29th . The sitting of a Court of Chancery and important business there have unavoidably delayed a reply. Now, it must be much more cursory than I could wish. As to the mission, in some shape or other, the more I have reflected upon it, the more has it appeared to me indispensable. To accomplish, with certainty, a principal object of it—the silencing...