Alexander Hamilton Papers
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Knox, Henry" AND Correspondent="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Correspondent="Washington, George"
sorted by: editorial placement

George Washington to Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, Henry Knox, and Edmund Randolph, 24 February 1793

George Washington to
Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson,
Henry Knox, and Edmund Randolph

United States 24 Feb: 1793.

The President of the United States requests the attendance of the  1 at Nine o’Clock tomorrow morning; at the President’s house, on the subject of the note sent to the   on the 17~. inst:2 and that the   will bring with him such remarks as he may have committed to writing in pursuance of said note.

At the same time the President will lay before the Heads of the Departments & the Attorney General some communications which he has just received from General Hull.3

Ge Washington

LC, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.

1This and the other spaces in this letter were left blank in MS.

3An entry in JPP description begins “Journal of the Proceedings of the President,” George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. description ends for February 24, 1793, describes these “communications” as follows:

“The following dispatches from Genl. [William] Hull were this day laid before me.

“Letter to the Secy of the Treasury, dated at Niagara 6th Feby 1793. Gives the reasons offered by Govr. [John Graves] Simcoe for not permitting supplies for the Indians, at the ensuing treaty, to be purchased by the U.S. in the British Territory or to be carried through it to the place of treaty.

“Letter to the Secretary of War, place & time of the foregoing. Gives an Acct. of his proceedings with respect to the six nations, & Governor Simcoe. Indians dislike the idea of changing the place of treaty. The language held by Govr. [Arthur] St. Clair at the Treaty at Muskingum, disagreeable to the Indians. The language of the President different, and pleasing to the Indians. Govr. Simcoe seems to think that by proper management, the Indians might be brought to recede from their demands with respect to the boundary. Proceedings at the Treaty, to be shewn to the British Minister.

“Proceedings of the General Council at AuGlaze from Septr. 30th to Octr. 9th. Representatives from 20 nations present. Union among all the Indians. Will hold a treaty with the U.S. at lower Sandusky in the Spring; but it seems to be expressed that if the U.S. are desirous of peace they must signify it by demolishing the forts &c. on the North of the Ohio before the treaty in the spring. Ohio to be the boundary between the U.S. & the Indians.

“From the Complexion of these proceedings which were noted by the British & attested by Mr McGee [Alexander McKee] A.I.A. it appears that the Indians look up to the British for council, & support.

“Answer of Govr. Simcoe to the General Confederacy.

“Proceedings of the Council of the six nations at Buffaloe Creek in November 1792.

“Answer of Govr. Simcoe to the six nations.” (JPP description begins “Journal of the Proceedings of the President,” George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. description ends , 55–56.)

Index Entries