Alexander Hamilton Papers
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Report on the Petition of Sundry Merchants of Wilmington, North Carolina, [21 November 1792]

Report on the Petition of Sundry
Merchants of Wilmington, North Carolina

[Philadelphia, November 21, 1792
Communicated on November 22, 1792]1

[To the Speaker of the House of Representatives]

The Secretary of the Treasury, to whom was referred the petition of sundry merchants of Wilmington in the State of North Carolina, by an order of the House of Representatives of the 26th of May 1790,2 thereupon respectfully reports:

That the case of the petitioners, as appears by their own shewing, is one arising wholly under the laws of the State of North Carolina, prior to its acceding to the present Constitution of the United States,3 and, of course, is without the reach of relief from the United States.

Which is humbly submitted,

Alexander Hamilton,
Secry. of the Treasry.

Copy, RG 233, Reports of the Treasury Department, 1792–1793, Vol. III, National Archives.

1Journal of the House, I description begins Journal of the House of Representatives of the United States (Washington, 1826), I. description ends , 625–26. The communicating letter, dated November 21, 1792, may be found in RG 233, Reports of the Treasury Department, 1792–1793, Vol. III, National Archives.

2On May 26, 1790, “A petition of sundry merchants of the town of Wilmington, in the State of North Carolina, was presented to the House and read, praying relief against the payment of certain duties, which they conceive were unjustly exacted from them, under the operation of a law of the said Sates.

Ordered, That the said petition … be referred to the Secretary of the Treasury, with instruction to examine the same, and report his opinion thereupon to the House.” (Journal of the House, I description begins Journal of the House of Representatives of the United States (Washington, 1826), I. description ends , 222.)

3North Carolina ratified the Federal Constitution on November 21, 1789.

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