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At a meeting of the agents appointed by the state of New York to manage their controversy with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts —it is agreed that a general retaining fee be given to Alexander Hamilton and Samuel Jones Esqrs. as Counsellors and Solicitors on the part of this State that the brief already prepared together with the necessary papers be put in their hands—That they compleat the...
Poughkeepsie, New York, July 26, 1788. “We the members of the Convention of this State, have deliberately & maturely considered the Constitution proposed for the united States. Several articles in it appear so exceptionable [to a majority of us], that nothing but the fullest confidence of obtaining a Revision of them by a general convention, and an invincible Reluctance to separating from our...
I thank you for the printed paper you sent me, and for your Letter by Monsr. Cadignan. On maturely considering the latter I took an opportunity in an informal conversation with Ld. Grenville to communicate it to him. Still I am unable to say any thing decisive relative to the objects of my mission—appearances continue to be singularly favorable; but appearances merit only a certain degree of...
I am happy to find by a New York paper, that the Result of the late Inquiry into your official Conduct is perfectly consistant with the Expectations of your Friends. It is there represented as being voluminous, and in a variety of Respects interesting. Be so good as to send me a copy. I wrote to you lately a confidential Letter, under Cover to the President. My Dispatches to Mr Randolph were...
[ Albany, September 20, 1798. On the back of a letter that Hamilton wrote to Jay on September 17, 1798, Jay wrote : “ansd. 20 Sep. 1798.” Letter not found. ]
I send you Copies of a Letter of 3 Augt. from Jacob Cuyler, and of my answer of this Date. It is natural for men circumstanced as he is, to be anxious; and as adversity too often begets neglect, marks of attention are doubly acceptable to men in his Situation. I fear you will find it difficult to do much for his Son. A little will to him be much. At any Rate write to him, and let him percieve...
Your favors of the 25, 26, & 30 July & 12 Inst have thus long remained unanswered. This Circumstance would naturally lead you to think me inattentive; others will induce you to ascribe it to a different Cause. Exclusive of Business which I never admit or urge as an Excuse for such omissions, want of Health has rendered me less punctual in my private Correspondence than I would wish. The...
On the 24 ult. I had the pleasure of writing to you on the Subject of fortifying the port of New York, and the measures preparatory to a Plan for it. Presuming that it has come to your Hands, it will only be necessary for me to inform you, that pursuant to an Intimation contained in it, I shall provide for the Expenses of perfecting the Survey, by immediately writing to Genl. Clarkson, and...
On my Return to this place on Friday last, I was favored with yours of the 3d. Instant. It seems that contradictory Reports still prevail respecting our negociations at Paris. I am not yet persuaded that Buonaparte has adopted in all its Extent, the System of Domination which the preceding Rulers of France attempted to execute; and therefore I presume that a Treaty of peace with America on...
I have conferred with M r King on the Subject of your Letter of the 3 d . Inst.— we concur in opinion that neither a Proclamation nor a particular charge by the court to the G[rand]. Jury would be adviseable at present. To us it appears more prudent that this Business be opened by the Presid ts . Speech at the ensuing Session of Congress— their address will manifest the Sense of the House, &...
^M r . King & I^ we have written this Day to you & General Knox To that Letter and its Enclosures I refer you. All Men are under moral obligations to support the ^[ important ?]^ ^the Cause of^ that Truth interesting to the Reputation or Property of Individuals— I presume therefore that the President will permit you to use ^all^ the Evidence of the Fact in Question, which may be in his...
I was this morning favd. with yours of the 27 Inst: I regret the circumstances which prevented our seeing each other when you was here. There are several Topics on which I wish to converse with you, & particularly respecting military arrangements at N York. The Riffle Corps & a few of the new Light Infantry Companies are established—there were Reasons, which I shall mention when we meet, which...
I have hitherto postponed making any Communications to our Legislature on the Subject of fortifying the Port of New York, in Expectation of receiving the Result of your proceedings relative to that object. Be pleased to inform me when I may expect it. Since your letter to me of the 19th. of November last, & which I answered on the 26th. of that month, none from you on the Subject in question...
On Monday the 17th. inst. I set out for Sussex in New Jersey with design after dispatching some private business I had there to proceed from thence on my Circuit. On the 19th. I found myself with a slight inflamation on one eye & some flying Rheumatic pains, to which not suspecting any thing serious I paid little attention. By the 25th. my Eyes were so much inflamed that it was with difficulty...
[ Bath, England, November 28, 1783. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from Mr. Jay …” to H, Columbia University Libraries. Jay had gone to Europe in January, 1780, as Minister Plenipotentiary to Spain. In June, 1782, he went to Paris to serve as one of the commissioners to negotiate peace with Great Britain. The definitive peace treaty was signed in Paris on September 3, 1783, and in...
I have this Instant recd. a Letter dated the 14th. Instant from Judge Hobart, resigning his Seat in the Senate of the united States, and as our Legislature is not now in Session, it hath become my Duty to appoint a Senator to succeed him and take his place, untill the next Meeting of the Legislature. The present delicate State of our public affairs, and the evident Expediency of filling this...
My Task is done—whether Finis coronat opus, the President Senate and Public will decide. This Letter goes by the Packet, and the Treaty with it. Some parts of it require Elucidation to common Readers. I have not Time for comments. Lord Grenville is anxious to dismiss the Packet. If this Treaty fails, I dispair of another. If satisfactory, care should be taken that public opinion be not misled...
Benjn. Cornwell and John Coles both of Schoharie, privates in capt. Andrew Whites Compy. of the 12 Regt. have just been with me, and with much Indignation complain of their officers. Cornwell says that he was enlisted by Lt. Tobias B. Cuyler or Schuyler (I am not certain which) about last new Year—that he was promised 12 Dollrs. Bounty on arriving at the place of Rendevous, Stillwater—that he...
Mr. David Jones, the Son of the Comptroller, wishes for the Honor of being one of your aids; and (with his fathers approbation) purposes on his arrival at N. York, to wait upon you on the Subject. This young Gentleman has been my private Secretary, and I do him no more than Justice in assuring you, that while with me I was not only satisfied but pleased with his Temper Disposition & Behaviour,...
I was this morning favored with yours of the 29 ulto. requesting to be informed, whether the Sum appropriated by the Legislature of this State, will come in aid of the completion of the works in the vicinity of New York? The act passed the 3d. of april last, for the paymt. of certain officers of governmt. and other contingent Expences, contains the following clause—it is the third from the End...
Your Letters of the 9 th . Inst. were this Day delivered to me, as I was preparing to go out of Town. The Subject of them is important— I have not Time to judge decidedly on some of the points— The enclosed will shew what my present Ideas of a proclamation are— it is hastily drawn— it says nothing of Treaties— ^it speakes of neutrality, but avoids the Expression, because in this country often...
M r . Carter lately delivered to me your friendly letter of the 25 th July last. You was always of the Number of those whom I esteemed, and your Correspondence would have been both interesting & agreable. I had heard of ^ your ^ marriage, and it gave me Pleasure, as well because it added to your Happiness, as because it tended to fix your residence in a State, of which I long wished you to be...
New York, December 21, 1790. Recommends John McComb Jr. as “an intelligent sober & industrious young Mechanic.” LS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. McComb was the son of a prominent New York architect and builder. The younger McComb became his father’s assistant in 1783 and began his own career as a builder in 1790.
At present I have not Leisure to mention more on the subject, than that the Gentleman who was thought of for a certain Employment, declines it—nor does he know of any Person who wd. probably be willing and also well qualified to execute what would be expected from him as necessary to ensure Success to the Plan. Yours ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. In JCHW John C. Hamilton, ed.,...
[ New York, November 14, 1791. On December 5, 1791, Hamilton wrote to Jay : “Your letter of the 14th of November duly came to hand.” Letter not found. ]
Yesterday I recd. and answd. yours of the 19 Instant. I have found a Copy of the Instructions, made by Wm. T. Franklin who was our Secy. They contain the following, verbatim —vizt. “You are to make the most candid and confidential communications upon all Subjects, to the ministers of our generous ally the King of France, to undertake nothing in the negociation for peace or Truce without their...
Since I left N York I have had the Satisfaction of seeing your late appointment announced in the Papers; but I have seen nothing that decides your Rank in Relation to other Majr. Generals. Doubts on such a point ought not to remain. Many will doubtless apply for Commands in the army, & it is to be wished that a judicious Selection may be made. There is a Gentleman (who for your Information I...
The bearer will herewith deliver to you a Book of accounts transmitted to me by Mr. Jefferson, and which in my opinion should be deposited in your office. With great esteem and regard &c. LC , Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives. An asterisk was placed at this point and the words “of Silas Deane” inserted as a footnote. Deane was one of the congressional agents sent to France...
Mr King & I have written this Day to you & General Knox. To that Letter and its Enclosures I refer you. All Men are under obligations to support the Cause of Truth. I presume therefore that the President will permit you to use all the Evidence of the tract in Question, which may be in his Possession or power, and consequently give you access to such Documents as may perhaps be in the office of...
Mr. Richard Laurence of Staten Island has complained to Congress, and to the King of Great Britain, that Judgments have been obtained and executed against him in certain Actions of Trespass, which he says were commenced and prosecuted in Violation of the Treaty of Peace. In these Actions I understand you was concerned for him, and as it is important that the Facts which concern the Merits of...
There is something very pleasant in the Reflection that while war discord and oppression triump in so many parts of Europe, their Domination does not extend to our Country. I sometimes flatter myself that Providence in Compassion to the afflicted in these countries, will continue to leave america in a proper state to be an azylum to them. Among those who have suffered severely from these...
on returning from Exeter here , the Evening before the last, I had the pleasure to rec g your Letter of the 13 th . Instant with the two Copies mentioned in it. Having no apprehension of such measures, they it what was to be done? appeared to me to be a Question of some Difficulty as well as Importance— To treat them as very important might render them more so than I think they are— The author...
New York, December 22, 1790. Recommends that Matthew Clarkson be appointed an inspector of the revenue. ADf , Columbia University Libraries. Clarkson, a resident of New York City, was a regent of the University of the State of New York and a member of the New York Assembly.
On Saturday week last I arrived at Pha. and very early the next monday morning set out in the Stage for this place. I recollected your Deed, but as Mr Iredell came to Pha. with me, and could take the acknowledgmt. I am persuaded you will excuse my passing on without waiting for that Business. The G. Jury at Richmd. requested a Copy of the Charge, the Burden of which was neutrality , and...
On my Return this Evening from Rye, I found your Letter of the 18 Inst: at my House. It is not difficult to perceive that your Situation is unpleasant; and it is easy to predict that your Enemies will endeavour to render it still more so. The Thorns they strew in your way, will (if you please) hereafter blossom, and furnish Garlands to decorate your administration. Resolve not to be driven...
[ Albany, February 7, 1800. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from Mr. Jay …” to H, Columbia University Libraries.
my last to you was of the 28 th . of last month ^Ult^ — I have read your late Report— If the Measures you recommend take place, Inspectors of the Revenue will be appointed. on that Head I am apprized that you ought, and therefore that you will be ^un^influenced by any other Considerations than those of public utility. under this Impression and with this mutual understanding, I take the Liberty...
I have conferred with Mr King on the Subject of your Letter of the 3d. Inst. We concur in opinion that neither a Proclamation nor a particular charge by the court to the G. Jury, would be adviseable at present. To us it appears more prudent that this Business be opened by the Presidts. Speech at the ensuing Session of congress—their address will manifest the sense of the House, & both together...
By the post I rec d . this afternoon Letters from the vice Presid t . & Att y Gen l ., calling me to the Board of Trustees— my answers to both are necessarily very concise, having been engag’d by Company, and now being pressed for Time— they are enclosed. I regard my Duty to attend the Courts as being in point of legal obligation primary , and to attend the Trustees as secondary — & yet I can...
I take the Liberty of communicating to you a letter which I have this day written to the Presidt. of the U States. and in which I have enclosed a Copy of the Act lately passed for the further defence of this State. If you understand the act as I do, and concur in the measure submitted by that Letter to the Presidents consideration be pleased to seal and to send it to the Post Office. But if...
I had last week the Pleasure of recieving from you a few Lines by Mr. Blaney. You will recieve this Letter by the Hands of Mr. Morris. He will also be the Bearer of my Dispatches to Mr. Randolph. They will be voluminous, particular, and in many Respects interesting. It should not be forgotten that there is Irritation here, as well as in America, and that our party Processions, Toasts;...
By the post I recd. this afternoon Letters from the Vice Presidt. & Atty. Genl. calling me to the Board of Trustees. My answers to both are necessarily very concise, having been engag’d by Company, and now being pressed for Time, they are enclosed. I regard my Duty to attend the Courts as being in point of legal Obligation primary , and to attend the Trustees as secondary —and yet I can...
Such was your Recommendation of Mr. Inglis for the place of a notary, that it is proper to mention to you the Reasons why he was not appointed. I think the number of officers should be regulated in general by the occasion or necessity there may be for them. In the City of New York there are at least Twenty public notaries; and that number being in my opinion more than sufficient, it does not...
On returning from Exeter the Evening before the last, I had the pleasure of recg your Letter of the 13th. Instant with the two Copies mentioned in it. Having no apprehension of such Measures, what was to be done? appeared to me to be a Question of some Difficulty as well as Importance. To treat them as very important might render them more so than I think they are. The Author of McFingall...
[ Albany, August 3, 1798. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from Mr. Jay …” to H, Columbia University Libraries.
In pursuance of a concurrent Resolution of the two Houses of the Legislature of the third and fourth instant I desire You as a Counsellor at Law to defend in behalf of this State a certain Suit brought against Lewis Cornwall by or in behalf of Alexander Colden for the Recovery of a Farm sold to the said Lewis by the Commissioners of Forfeitures for the Southern District. You will herewith...
On Monday the 17 th . ins t . I set out for sussex in New Jersey with design after dispatching some private business I had there to proceed from thence on my Circuit On the 19 th . I found myself with a slight inflamation on one eye & some flying Rheumatic pains, to which not suspecting any thing serious I paid little attention— By the 25 th . my Eyes were so much inflamed that it was with...
I have now the honor of transmitting to you herewith enclosed the extracts requested in your letter to me of the 2d. November last, and am with great respect and esteem &c. LC , Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives. At the bottom of this letter is the following: “List of papers mentioned in, and transmitted with the aforegoing letter. No. 1. Abstracts and Extracts from the...
I this moment recd. your’s dated the 8 Instant. My letter to Mr. Hoffman was not official. It was written to convey Information which however unpleasant was in my opinion useful to him to receive. His pecuniary Embarrassments called for circumspection on his part, and I intimated to him the propriety of accounting for the Expenditure of the amount of a preceding warrant before he recd. a...
Mr Coleman, who was yesterday appointed Clk of the NYork circuits, will be the Bearer of this. Mr. Skinner was first nominated—for where character and qualifications for office are admitted, the candidate who has age Standing and prior public Services on his Side, should I think take the lead; unless perhaps in Cases peculiarly circumstanced. Mr. Skinner did not succeed. Mr Coleman was then...