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I send you some extracts from a pamphlet lately published, in reply to one written by a Gentleman of my acquaintance ( not by me as has been by some conjectured) from which I have taken out some leaves which I send you. At the request of this Gentleman I trouble you to give me some explanation respecting the suggestions which are made particularly in respect to Col Pickering, General Miller...
[ New York, September, 1801. On November 21, 1801, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “Your letter dated in September came lately to my hands.” Letter not found. ] Washington, a nephew of George Washington, was appointed associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States on December 20, 1798, and served until his death in 1829.
I was extremely disappointed, My Dear Eliza, that the Mondays post did not bring me a letter from you. You used to keep your promises better. And you know that I should be anxious to hear of your health. If the succeeding post does not rectify the omission of the former I shall be dissatisfied and pained. I am chagrined at the prospect of being detained considerably longer than I expected. Our...
This morning, My beloved Eliza, I arrived here to pay a visit to your father, in the interval of the postponement of our causes, as I mentioned in a letter which I wrote you on Friday from Claverack. Your father’s wound is much better and your mother in good health. Your sisters are both on a visit to Rensselaer; but expected back to day or tomorrow. In the morning I return to Claverack. I am...
[ Albany, October 4, 1801. Gives directions for a shipment of trees. Letter not found. ] ALS , sold by Merwin-Clayton Sales Company, January 12, 1906, Item 55. For background to this letter, see H to Elizabeth Hamilton, October 4, 1801 . Description taken from the dealer’s catalogue.
I have reached this place, my dear Eliza, after a very pensive ride, and not a little pain at the State in which I left you. I trust you will exert yourself to vanquish it & will only look forward to our reunion which I shall try to make as speedy as possible. While I [am] about I shall think certainly of you and my dear children and with the tenderest sentiments. Adieu best of women   Yrs....
I wrote to my beloved from Rhinebeck . Yesterday Evening I arrived here and found your family generally well. Your father’s leg is not quite cured but it continues in a good way & Stringer promises that it will soon be perfectly sound. I have not, myself, been in better health for a great while, and all I want to complete my happiness is that your health should be restored. Pray take care of...
I was much relieved, My Dear Eliza by the receipt yesterday morning of your letter of Monday last. How it came to be so long delayed, I am unable to conjecture. But the delay gave much uneasiness in consequence of the imperfect state of health in which I had left you. Thank God you were better—for indeed my Eliza you are very essential to me. Your virtues more and more endear you to me and...
I take the liberty to ask the favour of your aid in respect to the inclosed notice from the Supreme Court of the UStates in the affair of the Schooner Peggy. It is to be delivered to the Agents of the Ship Trumball, who are Messieurs Howland and Allen and upon a copy of it an affidavit must be made before the District Judge of the UStates (who I am told resides at New London) that the original...
The Prince Bailli Ruspoli of the order of Malta, who will deliver you this letter was strongly recommended to me by Mr. King. He appears to me a very Gentlemanlike respectable man. As such I ask for him your civilities. Among these you can do nothing more grateful to him than to give him a letter of Introduction to some friend of yours at Washington. Adieu My Dr. Mac   Yrs. ever ALS , Montague...
Instead of delivering a speech to the House of Congress, at the opening of the present session, the President has thought fit to transmit a Message . Whether this has proceeded from pride or from humility, from a temperate love of reform, or from a wild spirit of innovation, is submitted to the conjectures of the curious. A single observation shall be indulged—since all agree, that he is...
The next most prominent feature in the Message, is the proposal to abandon at once all the internal revenue of the country. The motives avowed for this astonishing scheme, are that “there is reasonable ground of confidence that this part of the revenue may now be safely dispensed with—that the remaining sources will be sufficient to provide for the support of government, to pay the interest of...
Had our laws been less provident than they have been, yet must it give us a very humble idea of the talents of our President as a statesman, to find him embarrassed between an absolute abandonment of revenue, and an inconvenient accumulation of treasure. Pursuing the doctrine professed by his sect , that our public debt is a national curse which cannot too promptly be removed, and adhering to...
It is a matter of surprise to observe a proposition to diminish the revenue, associated with intimations which appear to contemplate war. The suggestions in the Message respecting the Barbary States, plainly enough imply, that treaties are found to be too feeble cords to bind them; and that a resort to coercive means will probably be requisite to enforce a greater sense of justice towards us....
[ New York, December 28, 1801. On Saturday, January 2, 1802, Schuyler wrote to Hamilton : “Your letter of Mondays date only reached me this Morning.” Letter not found. ]
In the rage for change, or under the stimulus of a deep-rooted animosity against the former administrations, or for the sake of gaining popular favor by a profuse display of extraordinary zeal for economy, even our judiciary system has not passed unassailed. The attack here is not so open as that on the revenue; but when we are told that the states individually have “ principal care of our...
New York, December 31, 1801. Sends depositions to Parsons, who is “of Counsel for the Underwriters in a case of Insurance in which my Brother in law Mr. Church is concerned.” Proposes that “these depositions … be used in evidence in any suit which may be instituted between him and your Clients.” ALS , Boston Public Library. Parsons, a Federalist lawyer from Newburyport, Massachusetts, had an...
In answer to the observations in the last number it may perhaps be said that the Message meant nothing more than to condemn the recent multiplication of Federal Courts, and to bring them back to their original organization: considering it as adequate to all the purposes of the Constitution; to all the ends of justice and policy. Towards forming a right judgment on this subject, it may be...
The next exceptionable feature in the Message, is the proposal to abolish all restriction on naturalization, arising from a previous residence. In this the President is not more at variance with the concurrent maxims of all commentators on popular governments, than he is with himself. The Notes on Virginia are in direct contradiction to the Message, and furnish us with strong reasons against...
Resuming the subject of our last paper we proceed to trace still farther, the consequences that must result from a too unqualified admission of foreigners, to an equal participation in our civil, and political rights. The safety of a republic depends essentially on the energy of a common National sentiment; on a uniformity of principles and habits; on the exemption of the citizens from foreign...
The leading points of the Message have been sufficiently canvassed, and it is believed to have been fully demonstrated, that this communication is chargeable with all the faults which were imputed to it on the outset of the Examination. We have shewn that it has made or attempted to make prodigal sacrifices of constitutional energy, of sound principle, and of public interest. In the doctrine...
The same Subject continued. As to Holland being the second power which acknowledged our Independence, and made a treaty with us, a step which involved her in war with Great Britain, it was deemed proper to treat her with a marked respect. Besides this, from the time of our revolution to the present, we have had large money concerns with her people. A trusty and skilful public agent was for a...
Resolved , as the sense of the Legislature, that the following amendments ought to be incorporated into the Constitution of the United States as a necessary safeguard in the choice of a President and Vice President against pernicious dissensions as the most eligible mode of obtaining a full and fair expression of the public will in such election. 1st. That Congress shall from time to time...
Albany, February 1, 1802. Urge Williamson to avoid litigation by settling his dispute with William Hornby and Patrick Colquhoun out of court. Copy, Rochester Public Library, Rochester, New York. For background to this letter, See Hornby to H, September 15, 1801 .
The Message observes that “in our care of the public contributions entrusted to our direction, it would be prudent to multiply barriers against the dissipation of public money, appropriating specific sums to every specific purpose, susceptible of definition; by disallowing all applications of money varying from the appropriation in object, or transcending it in amount by reducing the undefined...
[ New York ] February 10 [ 1801 1802 ]. States that he is “of Counsel” in the case of Steinbach adm United States and asks Livingston for permission to examine the witnesses “ de bene esse .” ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. Joaquim L. Steinbach was a New York City merchant and shipowner. An entry in H’s Law Register, 1795–1804, reads: “Steinbach adsm
After some pause, Gen. Hamilton rose. He began with stating his own decided opinion, that the contemplated repeal of the late act, taken in connexion with the known and avowed object of that repeal , was an unequivocal violation of the constitution in a most vital part. However, he did expect that on that point, the gentlemen present would be unanimous. Neither had he any hope that any...
He [Hamilton] confessed with seeming sincerity, he felt little zeal on the present occasion. He could prove that to repeal the judiciary law and to with-hold the salaries of the judges, would be an infringement of the constitution. He did not intend, however, to dwell on the constitutionality of the question. He allowed that gentlemen might have different opinions concerning it. His primary...
To these remarks General Hamilton rose again to reply—he remarked in substance that he had fostered the hope, that on this occasion, by cautiously avoiding to say any thing on the point of the constitutionality of the proposed repeal, and stating only the opinion of the New-York bar on that of its inexpediency , there would have been but one sentiment—He regretted, deeply regretted, that on...
From the manner in which the subject was treated in the fifth and sixth numbers of The Examination, it has been doubted, whether the writer did or did not entertain a decided opinion as to the power of Congress to abolish the offices and compensations of Judges, once instituted and appointed pursuant to a law of the United States. In a matter of such high constitutional moment, it is a sacred...
We might well be excused from taking any notice of such a writer as the author of the leading article in the Citizen of this morning; but as in one instance he has pretended to state facts, in reply to what was said in the Evening Post, respecting the opinions held in the Convention by Mr. Hamilton and by Mr. Maddison, some answer may be expected. Mr. Hamilton had been charged with holding an...
The advocates of the power of Congress to abolish the Judges, endeavor to deduce a presumption of intention favorable to their doctrine, from this argument—The provision concerning the tenure of office (say they) ought to be viewed as a restraint upon the Executive Department, because , to this Department belongs the power of removal; in like manner as the provision concerning the diminution...
Your letter of the 22d is the third favour for which I am indebted to you since you left N York. Your frankness in giving me your opinion as to the expediency of an application of our bar to Congress obliges me. But you know we are not readily persuaded to think we have been wrong. Were the matter to be done over I should pursue the same course. I did not believe the measure would be useful as...
In the course of the debate in the Senate, much verbal criticism has been indulged; many important inferences have been attempted to be drawn from distinctions between the words shall and may . This species of discussion will not be imitated, because it is seldom very instructive or satisfactory. These terms, in particular cases, are frequently synonymous, and are imperative or permissive,...
It is generally understood that the Essays under the Title of the Federalist, which were published at New York, while the plan of our present Federal Constitution was under the consideration of the people, were principally written by two persons James Madison, now Secretary of State, Alexander Hamilton, formerly Secretary of the Treasury. who had been members of the Convention which devised...
You have seen certain resolutions unanimously pass our legislature for amending the Constitution 1 by designating separately the candidates for President and Vice President 2 by having the Electors chosen by the people in districts under the direction of the National Legislature. After mature reflection I was thoroughly confirmed in my first impression, that it is true Fœderal policy to...
You will probably have learned before this reaches you that the act of last Session for the better organization of the Judiciary Department has been repealed, and I take it for granted, that you will with me view this measure as a vital blow to the Constitution. In my opinion, it demands a systematic and persevering effort by all Constitutional means to produce a revocation of the precedent,...
The President, as a politician, is in one sense particularly unfortunate. He furnishes frequent opportunities of arraying him against himself—of combating his opinions at one period by his opinions at another. Without doubt, a wise and good man may, on proper grounds relinquish an opinion which he has once entertained, and the change may even serve as a proof of candour and integrity. But with...
It was intended to have concluded the argument respecting the Judiciary Department with the last number. But a speech lately delivered By Mr. Giles in the House of Representatives, having since appeared, which brings forward one new position, and reiterates some others in a form well calculated to excite prejudice, it may not be useless to devote some further attention to the subject. The new...
I was not, My Dear Sir, insensible to the kind attention shewn me by your letter of the 30th. of November last. But till very lately the subject has been so extremely painful to me, that I have been under a necessity of flying from it as much as possible. Time and effort and occupation have at length restored the tranquillity of my mind, sufficiently to permit me to acknowlege the kindness of...
I felt all the weight of the obligation which I owed to you and to your amiable family, for the tender concern they manifested in an event, beyond comparison, the most afflicting of my life. But I was obliged to wait for a moment of greater calm, to express my sense of the kindness. My loss is indeed great. The highest as well as the eldest hope of my family has been taken from me. You...
New York, March 30, 1802. Seeks Dayton’s aid for client soliciting “the interposition of our Government with the Court of Spain for obtaining restitution of a vessel & Cargo seized in South America.” ALS , Joseph Hopkinson Papers, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.
Your Protegé Buisson has addressed to me the inclosed letter. Why he did not immediately write to you I cannot tell unless it be that he is conscious he has used your politeness sufficiently, and imagines an intermediary to be hereafter necessary. Perhaps you may be able to decipher his wishes from the letter; which I confess is beyond my skill. But I understand from him in conversation that...
Amidst the humiliating circumstances which attend our country, all the sound part of the community must find cause of triumph in the brilliant display of talents which have been employed though without success, in resisting the follies of an infatuated administration. And your personal friends will not have much reason for mortification on account of the part you have performed in the...
In order to cajole the people, the Message abounds with all the common-place of popular harrangue, and prefers claims of merit, for circumstances of equivocal or of trivial value. With pompous absurdity are we told of the “ multiplication of men, susceptible of happiness ,” (as if this susceptibility were a privilege peculiar to our climate) “ habituated to self-government, and valuing its...
Your letter of the 12th inst. has relieved me from some apprehension. Yet it is well that it should be perfectly understood by the truly sound part of the Fœderalists, that there do in fact exist intrigues in good earnest, between several individuals not unimportant, of the Fœderal Party, and the person in question; which are bottomed upon motives & views, by no means auspicious to the real...
General Hamilton has again appeared on the election ground. He found it necessary to harrangue the merchants at the Coffee House on Wednesday last, who view the little General as a God, on the prospect of success in the Second District . He expatiated largely we are told on the persecution , as the General was pleased to term it, sustained by Mr. Sands, the federal candidate of the Second...
[ New York, May 1, 1802. “Capt. Du Buisson who has obtained a decree of restitution of his vessel & cargo tells me that there are some obstacles, which he cannot explain, to his receiving the moiety of the proceeds reserved for the Captors, and remaining as he understands it in deposit with you. As he has solicited my aid which I have promised, you will oblige me by explaining as early as may...
The inclosed was put into my hands by Capt Du Buisson, when lately I was about to make a journey to the City of Washington, with the suggestion that you had desired it as a voucher for his right to receive 3000 francs from the Armateurs of the Peggy and which sum he informed me you would be willing to pay out of funds in deposit with you on account of that Vessel and her Cargo. The...
I have the pleasure of receiving your letter of the 26th. of April and with it the half barrel of Mess Pork. It is excellent. Nothing could have been more acceptable to me. It is an article I am particularly fond of—& the gift deserves additional value from the Giver . Receive my thanks & believe me always Yr. sincere & Affect friend ALS , Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford. Wadsworth, a...